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Your One Next Step

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How to Stop Self-Doubt & Become a Confident Leader

Watch Tricia’s new video that covers the 3 steps to owning your own journey.

 

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About This Episode

Even the most capable working professionals struggle with self-doubt, costing themselves time, money, opportunities, and their reputations.

 

In this special episode, Lisa interviews Tricia, focusing on her approach to helping leaders harness their grit and trust their gut so they can defeat self-doubt, gain confidence, and make progress on their priorities.

1. Keep adding value.

Some people feel stuck in their careers, like no matter what they do they will never get another opportunity. Tricia’s advice? Keep adding value and the next thing will eventually come your way. Look for opportunities to add value and help your leaders. Good leaders will eventually recognize your effort.

2. Don’t be so hard on yourself.

Keep learning and pushing yourself. Too many people focus on the negative. Maybe someone way back in your life told you a lie about yourself and you believed it. They told you that you can’t be more than you are, and that has caused a lot of self doubt. Push beyond the negative, evolve, and focus on your future.

3. Don’t let your current circumstances define your future.

Use it as a fuel to not become what they said you are, and don’t succumb to your environment. You decide what path you take.

 

Talk about your journey and how you got to where you are today. 
Has there ever been a moment when you experienced self doubt? How did you respond?
What are some ways you can add value in your current position, beyond what’s already expected of you?
Do you have any examples of “harnessing your grit” or “trusting your gut” in your career? If so, explain. 

Harness your grit and trust your gut.

Tricia Sciortino

Keep adding value and the next opportunity will come.

Tricia Sciortino

You can have negative surroundings, but you get to decide how they affect your future.

Tricia Sciortino

People don't accidentally get promoted.

Tricia Sciortino

Lisa Seal on LinkedIn and BELAY’s website

Tricia Sciortino on Instagram and LinkedIn

BELAY’s bookkeeper service

(02:07) Tricia shares something random that the listeners might not know about her. 

(06:11) LZ talks about Tricia being fiercely loyal. 

(07:29) Tricia talks about some of the challenges she faced during her journey at BELAY – from starting as the first employee of BELAY as an executive assistant to eventually becoming the CEO. 

(11:12) Has Tricia dealt with self doubt and discouragement during her career?

(14:46) What are some of the root causes of self doubt, and how can someone recognize it?

(18:10) Tricia shares her mom’s story and how it affected and influenced her throughout life. 

(18:40) “I chose to not let those circumstances to define my future.”

(20:10) Tricia expands on her two mantras: “Harnessing your grit” and “trusting your gut.”

(24:07) What are the characteristics of a confident leader?

(26:24) Leaders don’t have to be the expert in all things. They just need to hire those people and be good leaders to them. 

(26:45) What is a practical step someone can take to overcome their self doubt?

(29:12) Lisa talks about the fact that everyone controls their own narrative. 

(30:45) “We own our journey, and we get to make our own stories.”

(32:38) This week’s download: Tricia’s new video about 3 steps to owning your own journey.

Tricia Sciortino:

I have this insatiable belief that we can do anything. I can do anything. No one can stop you. No one can stop me. I really did believe. I mean, even in the seasons where I felt like maybe I was kicked down and I was told, “No, that’s not going to happen for you,” of course, you sit there for a minute, you recognize the self-doubt, and then you have to just pick yourself up and say, “I’m going to call bullshit on that,” right? There’s nothing I can’t do.

Announcer:

Welcome to One Next Step, the most practical business podcast in the world, helping you get more done, grow your business, and lead your team with confidence, with tips and tools you didn’t get in business school. Here are your hosts, Tricia Sciortino and Lisa Zeeveld.

Tricia Sciortino:

Welcome to One Next Step. I’m Tricia, the CEO of BELAY.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And I’m LZ, the CFO of BELAY. All right. A couple of episodes ago, Tricia interviewed me and now it’s my turn to ask the questions T. Tricia is passionate about helping leaders and anyone really overcome self-doubt. Today, she’s going to share her story of defeating doubt to become the CEO of BELAY. She’ll also talk about the root causes of doubt and what leaders can do to become more confident. Okay, Tricia, are you ready?

Tricia Sciortino:

I’m ready.

Lisa Zeeveld:

You’re so used to this.

Tricia Sciortino:

I like a hot seat. It’s better than a cold seat.

Lisa Zeeveld:

No, no, I’m just saying like… I mean, this is old hat for you. You do tons of interviews. You are quite famous in the world of…

Tricia Sciortino:

Oh, please don’t say that.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Oh, come on. No, no, no. Delegation, what it means to become a great leader. You are all over the place. I tease about you being in the hot seat, but really you’re an old pro at this. Thank you for letting me turn the tables and ask you some questions.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, thanks.

Lisa Zeeveld:

As I said in the intro, you interviewed me a couple of weeks ago and I shared with you something people didn’t know about me. I’m going to, again, ask you that question. Tell us something random that our listeners and maybe me I don’t know about you.

Tricia Sciortino:

I know. I don’t think there’s anything you don’t know about. You had a really fun fact about moving 27 times in your life. I’m just not that interesting. The only thing I can think of that is probably interesting about me considering my age more than anything is that I like to listen to hip hop music and I love rap music. I’m one of maybe few middle aged white ladies who really enjoys cruising down the highway in my car listening to the new Drake album that just dropped a few weeks back or Kanye.

Tricia Sciortino:

I really love that genre of music. It’s my favorite. That’s maybe what’s unique about me.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. Well, I think there’s many unique things about you and special things. I think you cut yourself short there.

Tricia Sciortino:

Thank you.

Lisa Zeeveld:

But yes, I would say that when we first met that I would’ve never thought that you… And not just like, like the music, but that’s like a passion of yours. You really enjoy hip hop, rap music.

Tricia Sciortino:

Oh yeah. The last concert I went to before COVID happened, it was actually in February, like a month before the world shut down last year, was to go see Post Malone. He was opened by Swae Lee. It was like one of the best concert I ever been to, and I was so glad I got to see him live before everything shut down. I really love the music.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Is there one artist in particular maybe right now, because I know kind of artists as you kind of get tired of their music, you switch, but right now, who would you say is your favorite?

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, no, I wouldn’t say I have a favorite right now to be honest. I think it just depends on what new music is out. Like I said, just been listening to the new Drake album. Most people may just poo on this, but I’ve been listening to some of the new Kanye songs. I know Kanye. Love him, hate him, whatever. I separate my feelings from him as a person with my love for his music. I can do that. I might not agree with his lifestyle or some of his things, but I think he makes great music.

Tricia Sciortino:

I have emotional intelligence about who I can listen to on the radio. I don’t care what their political affiliation is. They just make great music. That’s how I go about it.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I think it’s fun too that your husband Paul also really loves hip hop, rap music.

Tricia Sciortino:

That’s a very oddity of ours.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right, yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

It’s very embarrassing for our teenagers. My husband’s son, my stepson, will say, “Dad, you’re so embarrassing. Do you have to listen to rap music? Close the windows and lower it down. You’re so embarrassing.” My girls would be like, “Hey, how come it is you went to Post Malone, but you didn’t take us? What is that about?” Sorry, kids.

Lisa Zeeveld:

No, I love that. It keeps you young, right?

Tricia Sciortino:

It does. I love it. It feels relevant and current and that’s what I love about it. I mean, I love nostalgia, nostalgic music, like listen to good old ’80s and ’90s for a good throwback. And it brings back lots of memories. But in my day-to-day, like this morning, right before we got on here, I was listening to today’s top hiphop hits on Amazon Music.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah, I try. I mean, pull out any Tupac, a little NWA, I’m there. I’m there for it, right? That’s vintage. But now I kind of depend on my kids to tell me and teach me. I can listen to it if they’re in the car, but it’s not my go-to. I appreciate that that’s your go-to.

Tricia Sciortino:

It’s my go-to.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. The other thing that I think a lot of people don’t know about you that you didn’t share is that you are fiercely loyal.

Tricia Sciortino:

Oh, thank you. Is that unique? I hope it’s not. I wish it wasn’t that unique.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well, yeah. Gosh, I hate to say that too, but I think that is very unique in today’s time, but I don’t know if that’s something that just people think about. You’re a leader and you’re driving, but like you as a person, how fiercely loyal you are with your family and your friends. I think that’s just one of the more beautiful traits. Again, you cut yourself short in the beginning. One of the more beautiful traits and characteristics that you have is that you’re fiercely loyal.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I don’t think a lot of people can get close enough to you to realize that, so maybe that’s something that you hadn’t shared before.

Tricia Sciortino:

Thank you. Yeah, I’m one of those like I will die for my circle, right? I will have weapons ready. I will take it for you. I’m ready to fight for my people.

Lisa Zeeveld:

You have offered your services a couple of times for me.

Tricia Sciortino:

I mean, I do. I have Italian roots. I’m from New York. I know some people.

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s right. Well, speaking of your uniqueness and who you are, you also have a very unique story. You started as the very first employee at BELAY as an executive assistant to our founders, and now you are the company’s CEO. What an incredible story. Kudos to you.

Tricia Sciortino:

I mean, Drake would say… I mean, Drake has a song about me. We started at the bottom now we’re here. We started at the bottom now we’re here.

Lisa Zeeveld:

You just proved that earlier statement that you are a true fan.

Tricia Sciortino:

If I had a hashtag under my name, it would be that Drake lyric.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes. Yes. But as your friend, I know it hasn’t always been easy, yet most people would actually wish to have this story. They probably think it’s all easy. And of course, it was just all handed to you. To go from the bottom and work your way to the top is very hard. I’d love for you just to talk about some of the challenges that you faced in that journey. Make it real for us.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. I mean, it was real. I think the first thing to realize is that we’re talking about the sequence of events that happened over the course of a decade.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well, even more than that, right? Because I mean, your relationship with Brian…

Tricia Sciortino:

Was years by before.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right. Yes.

Tricia Sciortino:

With BELAY particularly, I mean, I started 11 years ago as a VA, but it’s not like two years later I was the CEO. I mean, there was a lot of patience and dedication and personal investment and a lot of inputs and struggles and roadblocks all along the way to get me to where I am today. It certainly wasn’t easy. I mean, people hear like, “Oh, you get promoted every other year and now you’re here.” People don’t just accidentally get promoted usually. I mean, it doesn’t matter how well liked you are.

Tricia Sciortino:

You actually have to do a good job and show up and add value. I think that was always my mindset was always keep adding value and the next thing will come, even in the midst of there is no opportunity. I know a lot of people can relate to that where they think maybe they’re stuck. I’m in this role. I’ve been doing this for years. There’s never going to be an opportunity for me to do more.

Tricia Sciortino:

There were many seasons along the journey where I was like, “Well, I mean, I’m the president and there’s nothing else. So I guess I’ll just be the best president I can be.” I didn’t always see that there would be an opportunity to be more than that, but I think you keep challenging yourself. You keep honing your skillset. You keep figuring out where to add more value to your owners or to your supervisor and opportunity will show up.

Tricia Sciortino:

I mean, it did for me multiple times. When I was the COO, I was like, well, I mean, our owners are the CEOs. That’s it. I’m done, right? I’m the CEO. I never really knew that there would be an opportunity to be the CEO. Actually when you asked him and said, “Is there an opportunity for me to be the CEO,” he would say, “No, I’m the CEO.” There isn’t an opportunity.

Tricia Sciortino:

But I still believed that I should continue to advance my skillset, to continue to add value to them and the business, and maybe one day something would come to fruition. And lo and behold, it did. I mean, the day came when they said, “You’re right. We don’t want to be the CEOs anymore.” The opportunity is there. I think I’d say just because you can’t see it in front of you doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist, and you should just keep working on you anyway and know that that will show up some way somehow down the line.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I think a lot of people would come with this huge amount of self-doubt, right? Maybe because he said I can’t be CEO, maybe I don’t actually don’t have the skillset to do it, right? They start to take it internally instead of thinking, oh, there’s not an opportunity right now, but I have the skillset to do it. They start to think there’s never going to be one. Or if there is, they certainly wouldn’t choose me. Did you ever deal with any of that? Have you in your life?

Tricia Sciortino:

Nice mic drop. Let’s just call it what it is.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I know. It was a mic drop. Mic fly.

Tricia Sciortino:

We all have a fumble, to your question. We all fall on our faces. And sure, did I fall at my face a lot of times and doubt myself for sure. There were seasons where I was very discouraged because I didn’t know what was next for me, or I didn’t know if I had what it took. But I didn’t sit there for very long, because I really do believe that goals mean something. You could have goals and that you’re not a stagnant person.

Tricia Sciortino:

If I didn’t have a skillset today that would get me to the next level, I mean, damn if I wasn’t going to go get it and hone it and figure it out and learn about it. Because I have this insatiable belief, maybe it’s because of how I was raised, that we can do anything. I can do anything. No one can stop you. No one can stop me. I really did believe.

Tricia Sciortino:

I mean, even in the seasons where I felt like maybe I was kicked down and I was told, “No, that’s not going to happen for you, of course, you sit there for a minute, you recognize the self-doubt, and then you have to just pick yourself up and say, “I’m going to call bullshit on that.” Right? There’s nothing I can’t do. Really believing in yourself and knowing it like really in your core knowing, there’s truly nothing I can’t learn. I mean, there’s so many resources out there, books and coaches and trainers and courses.

Tricia Sciortino:

I mean, you name it. The thing that is stopping you would only be you.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right. Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

That’s it. I’m not going to be the person that’s going to stop me, and I’m certainly not going to let anybody else. Lola is agreeing. Do you hear my dog?

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes.

Tricia Sciortino:

She’s saying, “Go mom go. I’m with you.”

Lisa Zeeveld:

She’s like, “Yes!”

Tricia Sciortino:

Mama!

Tricia Sciortino:

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Lisa Zeeveld:

Numbers are totally my thing, Tricia, and thankfully numbers are BELAY bookkeepers’ thing too. Our sponsor BELAY believes you deserve top notch bookkeepers to produce balance sheets, pay bills, reconcile bank, and credit card statements and monthly reports to keep you up to date on the numbers of your organization. Whether you’re a church, nonprofit, or a business, they have the right people ready to help. Talk to their team today and never lose sleep over your financials again. Get started by visiting belaysolutions.com/services/bookkeepers today.

Lisa Zeeveld:

From your experience then, knowing that you don’t live in that spot of self-doubt for very long, like three seconds, you’re like down in the dumps and you’re like, “Okay, pick myself up, here I go,” but do you have any knowledge about where the root of self-doubt comes from? What are some root causes of people who might have some self-doubt right now?

Lisa Zeeveld:

If they’re just trying to maybe recognize where that’s coming from so they can act more similarly to how you do in the face of adversity.

Tricia Sciortino:

I think that people just don’t give themselves enough credit. I think a lot of people view themselves in a negative way. It’s like the old adage that people will say, you can hear 20 compliments and one piece of feedback and you will spend a lifetime focusing on that one negative piece of feedback. I think human nature tells us to focus on what about us is broken or not right or wrong or needs to be fixed. I think some people can get stuck there and really have a lack of belief in themselves that they are worthy.

Tricia Sciortino:

I’m not worthy of the next thing. I’m not worthy. Their mindset really goes to a place where they don’t believe they can do more. This is the pinnacle of their life and they will always just be this place and woe is me. For me, it’s totally mindset. It’s absolutely mindset. Because there is nothing… I say this all time, there’s nothing genius about a lot of what leadership is.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right. Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

Right? You don’t need to have a certain IQ. You don’t need a master’s degree, an X, Y, and Z or a doctorate. There’s no hard skillset or something so technical that you could not learn. I always viewed it as these are all things… Any leadership book you pick up that would give you all the tips and tricks in the world about how to be a better leader, there’s none of those things in there that you can’t teach yourself, learn, practice over time, evolve. I think people think they can’t, but you can.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I always think that it also comes from a place where at some point in your life, someone told you a big fat lie and you believed it, right? Somebody that you admired… Unfortunately, this is where parents, like parental figures come in, or teachers, people of authority, somewhere along the lines, somebody was a jerk and told you, you could not be more. If I think about people I know that really sit in this place of self-doubt, it’s because somebody was mean and told them a lie and they believed it.

Lisa Zeeveld:

They never learned to believe in themselves, right? Because we all hear things. Feedback, which is actually truthful, right? There are some feedback that’s good feedback. There’s some people who are just mean and they’re just jerks, right? But it’s processing that information and knowing that it doesn’t have to be your solid truth, right? You have to be able to learn to get over that.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I think some people just kind of wallow in that self-doubt instead of doing what you did, which is saying hard things happened to you, but you just chose not to believe them or not to believe that was the end of your story.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. Some of it goes back to my mom, my mom’s story. My mother, real quick, came from a really difficult childhood. She was a child of divorce, abusive family, her father left at a very early age, she never saw him again for the rest of her life. Then her mother left her and her kids and they were raised by an aunt she never heard from. She was abandoned repeatedly. Just had a really hard life. My mom, who you’ve met, is the sweetest, kindest, most loving family oriented person you will ever meet.

Tricia Sciortino:

What she would say of me growing up is, “I chose to not let those circumstances define my future. Who I was yesterday and what happened to me before has nothing to do with my future. You either use it as fuel to break the cycle and not have that, or you can succumb to what your environment is and become part of what that is.” She would always say to me, “You decide. You make a decision. I chose to not lead that life.” Her brother, my uncle, didn’t. He wound up in hard times.

Tricia Sciortino:

My uncle was in jail. He followed the path that he grew up in and she decided not to. That always encouraged me for anything. You can have negative surroundings, but you get to decide how they affect your future.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. That’s beautiful. I love how generationally she had an opportunity to change the legacy of her family, right? She was very adamant about creating a legacy that was very different from what she came from.

Tricia Sciortino:

Absolutely.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, and I felt the same way. I mean, my dad wanted a son and he got me. Damn, if I wasn’t going to make him proud as a woman and that not define what my opportunities were going to be.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well, that fits right into harnessing your grit and trusting your gut, which I feel like are your two mantras. Expand on those a little bit for me.

Tricia Sciortino:

We all have a voice inside of us that tells us what we want. We have desires. We have wishes. We have hopes. We have dreams. We have things telling us things all the time. And in my opinion, they’re there for a reason. The whispers and the dreams, and, oh, I should just do this, but you convince yourself you shouldn’t. I’m here to say that those things are there as your guide, your internal guide. Trust what you’re hearing. My instinct is telling me I should go take this risk, even though on paper it seems so risky.

Tricia Sciortino:

But your intuition is a guide for you. I think we let our rational mind convince ourselves not to do things that our gut tells us we should do and maybe we wind up where we didn’t want to. An example of this would be when I joined BELAY. When I joined this organization, at the time, I was a single mom living paycheck to paycheck, trying to keep roof over our head for me and my girls. I needed stability. I needed health insurance for my kids and all of this.

Tricia Sciortino:

And then the owners decided they were going to start this startup company and they wanted me to go work there. On paper and my friends and family like, “You can’t go work at a startup. What if it fails? You need security. You have to have a roof over your head. What if it doesn’t work? And then you need health insurance.” My rational mind said, “You should not be taking a risk like this. It’s just so important that you take care of your family.”

Tricia Sciortino:

But my gut and my instinct said, “This is going to be amazing. I believe in this. This is not what makes sense on paper, but I’m going to trust my gut, and I’m going to trust my instinct. I’m going to take absolute leap of faith into something that does not make sense because somehow my instinct and my gut is telling me to do so. And I did and it paid off, right? Because then here I am. And now I don’t have to worry about how I’m putting a roof over my kids’ head, and I have all the health insurance and all the things that I had wanted.

Tricia Sciortino:

I had a momentary season of struggle making the initial leap, and I had to be gritty with how I was going to make that work for my family. But when you have a really compelling why or a really compelling reason to do something, it’s really easy to be gritty and trust your intuition.

Lisa Zeeveld:

You probably don’t remember this, but I remember when you were making the transition from the company that our founder came from and we were talking on the phone. We were actually going to have lunch together. You’re like, “Yeah, I just went out and bought a new cell phone because I know in this new journey, I may actually not be able to afford a new cell phone for a couple of years. I want to go ahead and buy it now before I make the transition over.”

Lisa Zeeveld:

I remember you being very methodical about planning and getting ready to jump with both feet into…

Tricia Sciortino:

To be able to do it.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. I mean, I remember going, okay, I have $45 in my budget for food this week. I would go to the grocery store with a calculator, like $42.57 cents plus…. Okay, I could afford this amount of groceries. But that was what I was willing to do to get to where I wanted to go.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right. Yeah. And most people aren’t willing to take that risk. It’s a calculated risk.

Tricia Sciortino:

Right. I was sacrificing.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes, calculated risk.

Tricia Sciortino:

I sacrificed comfort to go into discomfort to get to success.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right. Yeah. Beautiful story. Well, it takes a lot of confidence to do that too. What is a confident leader thinking and what emotions are they feeling even though they might have a little bit of self-doubt, right? I think there’s a difference. You have your confident leader who wants everybody to think they don’t ever have self-doubt, right? On the other side, you have somebody who wants to be a leader who’s full of self-doubt.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I think let’s look at the difference of the two. What are the characteristics of a very confident leader?

Tricia Sciortino:

I think confidence doesn’t mean knowing all the answers. Sometimes confidence is leaning into the right person who you think has the answer. There are a lot of things I don’t know about running this business, one of them being our finances, right? I am able to be a confident leader because I have a you, who I’m confident in. I think confident leaders are a combination of humble and also sure. When I say sure, I think of a captain of a ship.

Tricia Sciortino:

If you enter troubled waters, the crew does not want to see a captain confused, unsure, not sure which way to turn the ship, acting distressed, like woe is me, what are we going to do, right? I think the air of the captain and the leader is to create calm, confident, clarity. He might not know anything about half the engineering of the ship and he’s got assistant captains or whatever who are steering things for him.

Tricia Sciortino:

But I think it’s just an air of comfort and confidence and clarity and calm that you bring to a team of people even if you don’t have the answer and being okay to say, “I’m not really sure about that. Let me get back to my amazing leader and I’ll lean into their decision.” I think the higher we get in the organizational chart, the less we actually make decisions and the more your job is to help other people make the decisions.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I think that’s a really good point for all those who are looking at leadership is that they don’t have to be the expert in all things. They just have to be a really good leader of people.

Tricia Sciortino:

Hire those people. Surround yourself with experts and give them room and empower them to make decisions.

Lisa Zeeveld:

On the flip side, those folks who are dealing with self-doubt, what is a practical step or steps that someone could take to overcome that self-doubt?

Tricia Sciortino:

I would say there’s four steps I would walk through. I mean, the first thing is really understanding and accepting your doubt. It’s okay. We all have doubt. We accept our doubt. Maybe we’re kicked down. Maybe we’re in a season where, to your point, somebody has convinced us we’re not worthy or we can’t do something. Sit in that. Process it. Accept it for what it is. Then on the flip side at, second thing I would say is acknowledge what your strengths are.

Tricia Sciortino:

What are you good at? What are you awesome at? Where do you excel? Remind yourself of the value you do have. For every one negative piece of feedback we talked about, there’s 19 to 20 other amazing things about you. Get clear on I have this doubt and this one thing, but man, I’ve got 20 amazing other things going for me. Reset yourself that way. Think about what positive things and what your strengths are and what you bring to that. That will help encourage you and lift your mindset and your spirit.

Tricia Sciortino:

And then trust yourself. Trust your gut. Trust your instinct, trust what you believe. Believe in yourself. Listen to yourself, because those inside voices are there for a reason. And then the last thing is, all those things don’t matter if you don’t take action. You can accept your doubts, figure out what your strengths are, and trust your intuition, but then you actually have to go do something about that. What is your first step, for some people that might be setting some new goals.

Tricia Sciortino:

For some people that might be a conversation they want to have to their boss about, you know what? I would like to advance my skillset. Maybe it’s seeking a coach. Maybe it’s taking a class or building a skillset, but put it into action because that is going to be the fuel that accelerates your journey at the end of the day.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Beautiful. That’s awesome. Thank you.

Tricia Sciortino:

This has been super fun, LZ.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I know. I know. It’s so good. It actually feels very much just like you and I just picking up the phone and talking, right? This is so us.

Tricia Sciortino:

Chitchatting around. I know. This has been so fun. I appreciate talking to you about all this today. I’d love to know if you have a value to add, a takeaway, anything to contribute regarding self-doubt or confidence and kind of what your little value add is.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah, no, I mean, I think… I mean, you hit the nail in the head with all of this stuff, right? I mean, the one part I call out is I think it’s so important for folks to realize that they control the narrative. I don’t always have the same amount of maybe confidence or grit that you do. I think your background plays a lot into that. I tend to be a little bit on the softer side where things bother me more than they might bother other people.

Lisa Zeeveld:

When I think about the way that I’ve been able to harness my grit, it’s realizing that I change the narrative. And that just because someone says something about me, doesn’t mean it’s true. And that I do control my future. That’s why I’ve put all these steps into place for me, creating goals and doing all those kinds of things, because even when I have self-doubt, I can follow the goals, right? Because the goals are on paper and the goals aren’t emotions and the goals are just set.

Lisa Zeeveld:

That kind of leads me into that direction to accomplish what I want to accomplish. But I think that’s really important, just like what you said about your mom, right? She controlled the narrative. She decided whether or not she was going to wallow in the pain and the story that she was coming from or actually make a new story. I love that, and I love the fact that every single day we can to wake up and decide what story we’re writing today.

Tricia Sciortino:

That’s right. We own our journey and we make our own stories. And we get to decide. We don’t have to just float through life and take what it sends our way. We actually can make decisions and pivots all along the way that adjust the path we’re on. You could choose your path.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right. Right. When I mentor, I find that that’s really what has happened to people is going back to what I said earlier about the lies or the feedback that’s been given to them, people just really believe that’s the truth. And even if it is the truth, even if you had a hard time in your life and maybe you made decisions you weren’t proud of or said something you wish you wouldn’t have said, today’s a new day and today you get to wake up and be different.

Tricia Sciortino:

And it’s never too late.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right. Yes. Good point.

Tricia Sciortino:

Because I know people my age, there are people in our forties who say, “Well, this is my life and it is what it is. I wish I would’ve went into this other career, or I wish I would’ve gotten my degree.” You have a whole half of a life. Go to school. Get the degree. Who cares you’re 40, whatever? Go do the thing. You’re never too… We’re never out of time to make a change. It’s not like, oh, I’m older than 35 now, so I guess it is what it is. I’m like, oh, hell no!

Lisa Zeeveld:

No. No. Gosh.

Tricia Sciortino:

All the time in the world. Never too late.

Lisa Zeeveld:

No, I think about that all the time. I’m like, okay, well, I mean, I’m going to live… With modern medical technology, I’m going to live to be a hundred. Gosh, I’m not even halfway through my life yet. There’s a lot of time.

Tricia Sciortino:

We got a lot of living to do. There’s a lot to be done. You’ve got plenty of time.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well, thank you so much for giving us all these golden nuggets of goodness. I love just people hearing more about your journey and your story and how you just encourage people every single day. Thank you so much.

Tricia Sciortino:

Thanks.

Lisa Zeeveld:

All right, guys. As always, we have a download for you so that you can take your one next step. This week’s download is Tricia’s new video for three steps on owning your journey.

Tricia Sciortino:

Hope you guys enjoy it. If you want to listen, text the phrase one next step to 31996 or visit onenextsteppodcast.com and you will get access to today’s resource to help you keep moving forward. Thank you for joining us and join us next week for more practical tips and actionable tools to advance your business one step at a time.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Start by making today count.

Tricia Sciortino:

Next week, we’ll be joined by the executive coach and CEO of Building Champions, a leadership coaching organization, Daniel Harkavy. He’ll talk with us about decision-making and influence and why so many leaders struggle with it and how they can improve in this area. Here’s a sneak peek into our conversation with Daniel.

Daniel Harkavy:

The best, most effective leaders are intentionally curious, and that’s birth out of this humility. They ask amazing questions. There’s this saying that I love and that is you can tell a man is wise not by the answers that he gives, but by the questions he asks. At a young age, I learned that really successful people ask some of the most profound questions.

Announcer:

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