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About This Episode

Kendra Lewis became a mom as a high school senior and faced many challenges early in her life. Pushing herself to rise above what others said, Kendra worked full time while going to night school. She faced homelessness and doubt. But Kendra eventually graduated with three degrees, created multiple businesses, and has worked for some of the largest Fortune 500 companies in the world.

 

However, working for a Fortune company was not her dream. Her mission was to work with small businesses. She wanted to help entrepreneurs launch their ideas into the world – and that’s exactly what she’s doing today! Join us this episode as Kendra shares her passion to transform small businesses.

 

Your One Next Step

Download this episode’s activation guide, The Big Business Checklist, which is a list of tips inspired by our guest Kendra J. Lewis to help you think and act big even when you’re small. Print it. Then, use it to remind yourself of what you must do to develop a big business mindset. If you’re ready to eliminate the beliefs and behaviors limiting your growth, this activation guide will help you.

 

Download Now

 

In each episode, we highlight one next step for you and provide an activation or delegation guide to help you immediately take action, start applying what you learn, and get your team to help you.

1. Delegate!

You can’t be the social media expert, marketer, HR director, and CEO at the same time. If you’re trying to do it all yourself, now’s the time to stop! You can’t focus on strategy and the long-term health of your organization when you are down in the weeds with all the tactical work. Find the gaps in your skill set and your organization, and fill them with experts in those areas. Then, get out of the way and let them do the work.

2. Don’t get distracted by too many shiny nickels.

If you’ve veered off path, remember to always bring it back to what your business is about – what’s your “why, your vision and mission? It’s easy, especially for entrepreneurs, to go from thing to thing thinking that you’re growing and improving. But make sure each new initiative or project is part of an overall strategy, and that it all ties together. And be sure to evaluate them annually, making sure they’re still worth doing and there aren’t any issues that need to be addressed before moving forward.

3. Once your plan is in place, give it room to breathe.

In other words, don’t get too reactionary if it isn’t going exactly as planned right from the start. The more invested we are in the business, the more quickly we may be to press the “panic” button when things get the smallest bit off track. Give yourself a reasonable milestone date to reevaluate how things are going – and, then, adjust if needed. The last thing you want to do is pull the plug on something that could’ve been successful but simply needed a few tweaks here and there to keep it going.

What is the “why” behind what you do?
Kendra talked about the idea of “operating at a level beyond where you are today.” What does that mean to you? And how would that look in your organization?
What are your core and non-core activities? Do you feel like you’ve done a good job of delegating the non-core activities?
Explain the difference between “top-down” and “bottom-up” planning that Kendra discussed. Which do you tend to do more often?

The most powerful thing that a business owner can do is to honor their journey.

Kendra Lewis

Mindset is 90% of the battle.

Kendra Lewis

Once you have the vision, you have to start by putting action behind it.

Kendra Lewis

The first step to shifting into your inner Fortune 500 company is being bold
enough to envision it.

Kendra Lewis

(03:20) Kendra talks about being a “foodie” and her go-to choice: Vietnamese pho.

(05:53) The power in honoring your journey and avoiding comparison.

(08:22) How Kendra works with clients to help them articulate what their journey has been.

(09:59) How does a small business owner get in the mindset of a big corporation?

(11:25) Operate at a level that’s way beyond where you are today. See into the future and prepare yourselves for it.

(14:04) Kendra’s process of taking new, young entrepreneurs and strategizing for the future while still operating the current business.

(15:42) “What do you want, and what is your calling?”

(17:43) If you don’t have a solid “why” behind your business, you will struggle as soon as you start hitting obstacles.

(19:05) You have to know and continue revisiting what your “core” and non-core” activities are.

(21:39) “Once you have the vision, you have to start putting some action behind it.”

(22:56) The value in planning ahead and avoiding being too reactionary once the plan is in place. That’s how you think like a Fortune 500 company.

(24:52) The difference between “tops-down” and “bottoms-up” planning.

(30:43) Download this episode’s activation guide, The Big Business Checklist, which is a list of tips inspired by our guest Kendra J. Lewis to help you think and act big even when you’re small.

Kendra Lewis:

I realized that I can no longer bulldoze my way into the results, like I did in corporate America because mindset is 90% of the battle at this stage. And I’ve had to build my own mindset to start operating in a different way.

 

Speaker 2:

Welcome to One Next Step, the most practical business podcast in the world. Helping you get more done, grow your business, and lead your team with confidence with tips and tools you didn’t get in business school. Here are your hosts, Tricia Sciortino and Lisa Zeeveld

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Welcome to One Next Step. The practical business podcast that helps you run your business and makes it stop running you so you can enjoy your work and your life. I’m Trisha Shortino, the CEO of BELAY

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

And I’m Lisa Zeeveld The COO of BELAY Together we’re T and LZ. We’ve known each other since 2005. Wow, how can it be that long? And we’ve had the privilege of working together for almost a decade! We have grown a 100% remote business from start-up to being recognized on the Inc 5000 fastest growing list of companies for six years running. Yes, and we have learned a lot along the way, and have made some great friends and partners. For the One Next Step we are cashing in some favors to bring you episodes filled with excellent content, delivered by some amazing and talented people, and we may have a thing or two to add ourselves.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

The One Next Step is here to help you on your leadership journey.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Each week, we release a new episode answering your questions about running an organization. We will always highlight One Next Step for you to take immediate action and include an activation guide that reinforces what you heard today. Now we are joined by Kendra Louis. We will dig into how small businesses and entrepreneurs can begin to think like Fortune 500 companies.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

All small businesses want to be successful, right? Your business can win today and tomorrow, and we are here to help you do just that. Kendra Louis is an Atlanta native. She became a mom as a high school senior, and faced challenges and negative opinions of others early in her life. Pushing herself to rise above what others said, Kendra worked full-time while going to night school. She faced homelessness and doubt, but Kendra eventually graduated with three degrees, created multiple businesses, and has worked for some of the largest Fortune 500 companies in the world!

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. She has an amazing story of dedication and determination paying off, however working for a Fortune company was not her dream. Her mission was to work with small businesses. She wanted to help entrepreneurs launch their ideas into this world. Now join us as we talk with Kendra, and she shares her passion to transform small businesses.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Oh my gosh, I could not be more excited to have you on here today, Kendra! Welcome, welcome, welcome!

 

Kendra Lewis:

Thank you so much. I’m super excited to be here!

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, okay. We have already done a ton of bragging about you, because there is so much to brag about. I’m going to kind of ask you a silly question, something that maybe not our listeners know about you so what is your favorite food? And like where do you find it? Do you cook it? Do you go out to get it? So tell our listeners today.

 

Kendra Lewis:

Oh my goodness! I am a foodie, like self-proclaimed so there is not too much food that I don’t like and it’s so funny because I always tell people I love to travel, but I really love to travel because I like to eat. That’s really the underlying theme. I would have to say my go to, my absolute favorite food is Vietnamese pho. I love pho! I could eat it every single day. As a matter of fact, I used to eat it every day for lunch, and when I was working at Target Corporate Headquarters, there is a little place in Minneapolis inside of the Sky Ways called Bip so shout out to Bip. Some of the best pho I’ve ever had, and I literally would eat there every day for lunch.

 

Kendra Lewis:

When I had like meetings that I needed to rush through, I would literally get the pho to-go and take it back to the meeting. Not necessarily the most professional food to try to eat during a meeting, but I love it. I miss it and I have tried to make it myself, and it was an epic fail.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Have you found a place here in Atlanta that compares to Bip?

 

Kendra Lewis:

Not yet.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Okay.

 

Kendra Lewis:

I found some places that could pass for a little bit, but something about that broth. I think it’s the broth.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

There are some foods, I don’t know, it’s just hard to replicate at home.

 

Kendra Lewis:

For sure.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Follow the recipe, item by item, still just doesn’t work out. I love that. That was a very unpredictable answer so I loved that you asked that question.

 

Kendra Lewis:

I’m going to have to travel to Vietnam.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

That’s a fun fact.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Now we just need Bip to sponsor Kendra so if you’re out there listening, she wants it overnighted, FedEx.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Nowadays anything ships, right?

 

Kendra Lewis:

It’s true.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Oh gosh. I love it. Let’s dive into why we are here today to have this great conversation with you. You have the most amazing story, and such powerful experiences so I’m so looking forward to hearing your advice, and kind of talking through today’s topic. I would love to just start out with the simple question, what is the most powerful thing a business owner can do for their business?

 

Kendra Lewis:

Oh goodness. We started out with a tough one here. We’re going right in.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

We’re just going straight for it.

 

Kendra Lewis:

Oh my goodness. You know what? The most powerful thing that a business owner can do is to honor their journey. Honor their journey, and I know that’s loaded, but whether you’re in your beginning phases or whether you are at that, what I call like the big business phase when you start having big girl problems, and we can talk more about that later, but whatever stage you’re at, you will be a much better CEO if you honor your journey and the steps that you need to take to get where you need to go. I see a lot of business owners struggle with the honestly the spiral of comparison. That’s because we’re not honoring our own journey. We’re trying to drive in someone else’s lane.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

I love that. You did not answer that question lightly either so you were like, “We’re going deep.” And you were like okay, I’m going to one-up you, like here’s my answer. That’s really good because I think that so often we see that, here within our business, and even just being a leader that it’s really easy to go, “I’m not as successful as…” this person, right? Because I’m doing it… We’re all on different paths, different timelines. You’re not going to come in tomorrow and do my job and be exactly like me. You’re not supposed to be. You weren’t created to be me.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s really profound.

 

Kendra Lewis:

Thank you. I think so much comes… I think everything else falls into place after you do that because if you honor your journey, you’ll honor that they’re going to be some things that you have to do that are going to pull you out of your comfort zone. If you honor your journey, you will honor the vision that you were given. Just like you said, you can’t do somebody else’s thing. They weren’t built to do that. You’ll be able to tackle all of the hard stuff that comes along your way if you focus on literally honoring that journey saying, “I am going the path that was made for me.”

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Do you find that you actually have to help people find out what that journey is? Like they come with a big idea, like so maybe they’re just starting out or maybe they’ve been in it two or three years, and feel like they’re on someone else’s path. Do you actually sit them down and be like, “Okay, hold on,” or like how do you get them to the place where they can actually articulate what that journey is supposed to look like for them?

 

Kendra Lewis:

That is an amazing question. Yes, the short answer is yes. And as a part of my journey, I’ve had to learn that that’s something that I have to do. I have to realize sometimes I have blinders on because in my previous life, I was just like able to go and bulldoze into these big companies, into corporate America because they were asking me to come bulldoze my way thorough, not realizing that those places already had certain things set in place. They already had foundation. They already had structure. They already had things moving along, and I was just coming to either launch something new in something that was already stable or to fix something that needed to be fixed in these big environments. When I switched to working with solo-preneurs and entrepreneurs and small businesses, I realized that I can no longer bulldoze my way into the results like I did in corporate America because mindset is 90% of the battle at this stage.

 

Kendra Lewis:

I’ve had to build my own mindset to start operating in a different way.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. How does a small business owner get into the mindset of large corporation?

 

Kendra Lewis:

Great question. That’s what we’re here for today. You know what? I think the first thing is I always talk about step one is like having that vision of the big corporation, which actually starts with that’s the initial mindset you have to have as a new CEO. If you can’t envision yourself there, if you’re being your own limiter, if you are saying that this is just going to be a little thing that I’m just going to do and keep it in the shadows, that is about how big your business is going to be. Right? Because a lot of us, and I can put myself in the same boat, a lot of us have not seen this model in our circles before.

 

Kendra Lewis:

We haven’t seen… A lot of us don’t come from being able to see someone in our family or in our immediate circle that’s like an uber successful, multi-million dollar entrepreneur that is at the head of a Fortune 500 company so it’s really that first thing, that first step into really shifting into your inner Fortune 500 company is that you have to be bold enough to envision it.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. We say a lot around here, at BELAY that we want to be operating at a level that’s millions beyond where we are today, from a revenue perspective so like we want to operate as if, and lead as if we are a $100 million organization, even when we’re not. Because right, we’re seeing it into the future, and preparing ourselves for that level of corporate growth and strategy that goes into ourselves, and developing to be ready for when we’re that size.

 

Kendra Lewis:

Absolutely, and it’s so difficult… I think what a lot of people don’t understand is it is very difficult to build that plane while it’s already flying. I know my team, like when we had our… Let me pull back. When I started growing exponentially, I had to go ahead and prepare for that next big milestone because I was like, first of all, this just kicked my butt. I’m not doing this again, neither can I do it again well. Even though I’m not there, I wasn’t there yet, I immediately started building that foundation so the next go round when I knew it was going to be even bigger, we would have some things into place. Then I had to bring the team on to do that, and now my team is like, “We’re not doing this mess again.”

 

Kendra Lewis:

Like before we do it the next time, we have to go back and now build the infrastructure for our next level, and that’s what big companies are doing all of the time. They’re always building for the future.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

And I was going to say, I think that’s what I love about your platform is because you did have that experience at these large Fortune 500 companies, that when you go to create your own business, you have that experience, but so often, right? People from certain circles may not have the experience, but they have the passion, and they have the idea to do it, don’t have the resources and don’t even know how to create the plan.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

It’s like this weird dichotomy of they are still trying to run the business, and get the business off the ground. They know that they might want to be a $100 million company some day, but they don’t even have a blueprint for that. And I really think that’s cool that that’s where you’re able to come in is to help folks create that blueprint of what it feels like to strategize because they may not have the skillset to do that. So I’d love for you to unpack that a little bit. What does it look like for you to take a new entrepreneur or somebody who is young in their journey and see, and learn how to strategize, like a Fortune 500, while still operating the business? Because tactical versus strategic is two different skillsets.

 

Kendra Lewis:

Very, very different skillsets, and not unfortunately, but like the thing is when you sign up for entrepreneurship, you have to master both or you have to bring someone in that can master both of them. Because you don’t have the power of an army behind you like big companies do to fill in your gaps. I would say the first thing is when I work with a newbie, it really is finding out what their motivations are and what they really want. I think what I see with new business owners a lot, and even people that are transitioning from their nine to five transitioning from corporate America into entrepreneurship is understanding what do you want? Because here’s the deal, a lot of people have gotten into this kind of popcorn mentality or like the phrase I always use is we get fooled by what’s out here in these internet streets, and we think that we see overnight success stories and we aspire to that.

 

Kendra Lewis:

And we say, “Oh, they got their millions by being a business owner so I need to do that. I need to start a business.” What I find is that a lot of times if you’re doing that, you’re doing it for the wrong reasons, and you’re building something that’s not authentic to you. My first step is to really understand what do you want, and what is your calling? Right?

 

Tricia Sciortino:

So the luxury handbag is not enough to create a business?

 

Kendra Lewis:

No! No.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Wow! I mean don’t throw the handbag under the bus while you’re at it, please.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right. Because on the streets of the social media internet, you’re seeing if you’re a gentlemen out there listening, you’re seeing somebody pulling up in a fancy car, and you’re like, “That’s why I want to start a business.” For us, ladies, we might want the fancy car. That was my motivation, I’m not going to lie, but it could also be the handbags, but that’s not going to keep you moving forward.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

It won’t sustain, right, right, and purpose, mission, fulfillment.

 

Kendra Lewis:

Exactly!

 

Tricia Sciortino:

You have to have that like intrinsic, internal calling, if you will.

 

Kendra Lewis:

That is the calling. I always tell people like, “Don’t come to me if this is not your calling.” Right? Because it may work for a little while, but it won’t work in the long run, and that’s a true story. Somebody can refute me if they want to, that’s listening, but I used to run into this a lot when I first started. My platform when I started was showing businesses how to get funding, and to get credit without using their personal credit.

 

Kendra Lewis:

People saw that I was being successful with that, and saw that I was making some good money with that, and then it became, “How can you teach me how to do this too? I want to build business credit. I want to show people how to do this. I want to teach people like you do.” And I’m like, “What in your life experience has prepared you for this?” Is this something that you’re good at? And that you’re trying to get more knowledge on? Or is this something that you saw me do? And you said, “You know what? She does this, so I can probably do it too.”

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Copycat syndrome. Yeah, business is hard so if it is not your passion, and you don’t have a good why and a vision, I mean at the first hard thing that comes your way, the first hill, the first pandemic, boom! You’re out of business because it’s actually not in your heart to keep on going.

 

Kendra Lewis:

You fall right off the wagon.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

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Lisa Zeeveld:

Whether you’re a church, non profit or a business, they have the right people ready to help. Talk to their team today, and never lose sleep over your financials again. Get started by visiting BelaySolutions.com/Services/Bookkeepers, today.

 

Kendra Lewis:

A lot of people don’t know this so this is behind the scenes in big companies because there is so much going on, we oftentimes in strategic planning have to do an activity called core and non-core activities, and this is an exercise that big companies go through and say like, “What is our actual core thing that we need to do? What is our core competency?” And you have to keep revisiting that because as new people come in with all these ideas, they’ll start bolting on a whole bunch of stuff and bolting on some more, and it’s like this is not actually what this company does so you’ll forget what you’re actually good at and what you’re supposed to do because everyone has piled on all of these shiny objects.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

I love that! What is the frequency? How often, is that like an annual check-in, quarterly? What would you recommend organizationally you kind of sit down and say, “Are we doing what we’re called to do, and what we’re supposed to be doing right now?”

 

Kendra Lewis:

Absolutely, I would say at least annually. Because a year gives you some time to test things out, and if you need to course correct, right, that course correction comes from the top so you should always be able to look at your company’s mission statement, and say, “Am I doing what I said it was I actually do. Right? Or did the first time that that thing that I did, didn’t work, I decided to throw it away and start doing something else, and then that one didn’t work either so I started doing something else. It’s like you didn’t give your thing time to work.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

We’ve made that mistake. We made that mistake in the early days. We would say, “We don’t like how this looks. We’re going to make a change.” Then three months later, we’re like it’s not making a difference, let’s make another change. Meanwhile, three months is not enough time to know if anything is worked anything. We’ve learned over the years that any time we make a pretty drastic change organizationally, we need to give it a minute before we make a too quick to judge decision on its success or failure.

 

Kendra Lewis:

Absolutely. My team, we had our first annual, or first quarterly plan-cation with my

team. That’s something that…

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

I like that terminology, plan-cation!

 

Tricia Sciortino:

I’m going to steal that! Yes. We can plagiarize that one!

 

Kendra Lewis:

You can use that.

 

Kendra Lewis:

It’s so funny because I, another thing that I always have to say is once you have the vision, you have to start putting some action behind it. When I decided that I am going to carry myself and my business like a Fortune 500 company, when I was still a solo-preneur, I did my first plan-cation by myself in February. I went to Chateau Elan for a week, and locked myself in a room and ordered overpriced room service and overpriced wine, and I came out with an entire plan for 2020. And that is something that I’m like every year.

 

Kendra Lewis:

In corporate America, we had an annual planning process. I’m going to do that for my business, even if I’m by myself. Now it’s something that now that I have a team, we’re doing it quarterly, but I said all of that to say on our plan-cation, our team, we made some hard decisions, and we decided to get rid of some offers that we learned from and that we launched this year, and it didn’t work out. We all agreed that, “This is what we’re doing for 2021, and we’re not touching it again until 2022.” We’re going to let it run for 2021. It’s no more flip-flopping. No more… It’s like we’ve got to see what happens.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

I love the theme of what we’ve been talking about today because I think at its core, the difference between a young business, a solo-preneur, a small business is that they’re a little too reactionary at times, and they don’t think like that big Fortune 500 company because those Fortune 500 companies are planning ahead, and so I think that’s a great takeaway today is that they really have to learn how to plan, even if it’s a solo-preneur, it’s just them, and they’re just locked in Chateau Elan, outside of Atlanta, for those of you who might not know where that’s at here, ordering overpriced room service because not only do they need to do this, but they actually deserve to do it. I think that’s really hard for a lot of solo-preneurs to put themself in a position where they actually think they deserve anything.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Because during that grind stage, you’re just grinding and grinding and grinding, and not realizing that they have to…

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, and wearing all the hats! They’re doing all of the things. They’re the marketer. They’re the sales person. They’re the administrator. They’re the vision caster. You are all the things when you’re at that level so to take a minute and step away, to have a plan-cation probably feels like it’s selfish or can’t be done or shouldn’t be done or it’s flippant, but actually it’s the most important thing you can do. For me, that’s the takeaway of all this conversation so far is that being strategic and having a plan is how you think like a Fortune 500 company.

 

Kendra Lewis:

Absolutely. I’m going to say another big thing that I see. I’m about to get…

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well we are the most practical business podcast so we’re ready. Lay it on us!

 

Kendra Lewis:

I’m about to get riled up now! You know? I was just getting warmed up.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s right.

 

Kendra Lewis:

I hear this so much so everybody listen, lean in real close. This idea in corporate America we call this tops down versus bottoms up planning. As entrepreneurs, and this is not just newbies. This is seasoned entrepreneurs. This is, we have a tendency to live in the bottoms up land, and I’ll explain what that means. We see a course that comes across us online, and it’s like learn how to write emails and you’re like, “Let me grab that!” Then we get a course that’s like learn how to start a podcast, let me get that, and we can find something how to run Facebook ads and how to do this thing or how to do that thing. Then we get all of this information and we’re like, “I don’t know what to do.”

 

Kendra Lewis:

Because we hoarded all of the things. Here’s the thing, all of these things seem confusing because they’re not laddering up to any overall strategy. So listen up business owners, the way you should do is say, “This is overall what our goals are. These are the things we need to get to our goals.” Then you figure out what your gaps are, and then you go get the course or the coach for that to fill in the gaps. That is what big companies do.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes. You don’t just do all the things. Like not all the shiny nickels. You don’t just grab every interesting thing that you think would be great to know. You actually strategically decide what are the things you need to learn.

 

Kendra Lewis:

Exactly.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Love it. That is a perfect spot to end. I know, I’m getting warmed up too, Kendra. We might have to continue the conversation offline. You have just brought so much goodness to our listeners today. Thank you for being real and authentic, and you know…

 

Tricia Sciortino:

And fun!

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Giving our listeners, like we said before, we like to joke about being the most practical business podcast, but there’s a lot of theory out there, and we want to help all businesses be able to grow. I like to say, there’s enough money out there for everybody. Let’s help each other grow, get bigger, and help some of these great ideas get to be great, big ideas. Thank you so much for spending time with us today, and I’m super excited for our giveaway. Which is your big business checklist.

 

Kendra Lewis:

Yes!

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s pretty cool that you’re willing to give that to our listeners so thank you so much. It was a pleasure talking with you.

 

Kendra Lewis:

Thank you for having me. I’m so glad to be able to talk to you guys, and I hope this helps someone today. Thank you for having me.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Thanks Kendra!

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Wow Kendra was a great guest today. What a great reminder, we have certainly been down that road before. We have learned a lesson or two about paying too much attention to the shiny nickel and getting a little distracted, and maybe veered off plan or veered off strategy. We have absolutely. Sometimes when you have so many opportunities coming at you, it’s hard to say no, and avoid what looks so interesting, exciting, but I love how she talked about really remembering to bring it all back to, and evaluating at least annually like, “What are we in business to do here? What is our mission? Are we on task? Have we veered off track? Have we created a flood out of a river?” So I really loved that she focused on really remembering to remain focused on what it is we’re out to do. We have certainly learned that lesson throughout the years.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Somebody could learn that many years earlier than it took us to learn it, then bless it. That’s my takeaway for you all, is focus on bringing it back around and making sure that you’re doing the right things.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah, and to kind of go a step further is if you have a smaller staff so maybe it’s you and say just a handful of people, that sometimes you feel like you have to do everything, and so I like how she said that the bottoms up, like you all of a sudden think that you need to be the best social media strategist out there. You think you still need to be planning your travel. Like you’re trying to learn how to build a website, when you don’t need to. I think part of that, of learning to be a river not a flood is finding those gaps and filling them with people or filling that with a skillset and not trying to do it all yourself because then you’ll just get overwhelmed, and you’ll lose that focus.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

That, I think, is ultimately how you become a flood.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. I mean not to make this a glorifying ad for BELAY but that was a foundational aspect to how this organization was built. Our owners, Brian and Shannon, from the first day, they were offloading the things, and trying not to be the experts in all of the things. I think we’ve learned how to do that from the beginning because of them. If we are distracted by trying to be the expert in email management, and the excerpt in Facebook ads, then we can’t be strategic. We can’t focus on growing the business. You get stuck in the weeds. At the end of the day, it’s a core principle of delegation, which is what we preach a lot at BELAY is you cannot nor should you try and do it all. If you want to be big, you have to think big.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

In order to think big, you have to get out of the weeds.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Totally. You have to delegate, yeah. Such a great tie in to what Kendra’s message is. If you’re going to continue to think small, and try to do it all yourself, you’ll never be big.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Amen!

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. All right. We know what time it is. It’s time for the One Next Step, as the most practical business podcast, we want to make sure taking action isn’t overwhelming to you so with each episode, we’re going to offer you one next step to propel you and your business forward. Today’s next step is to download this episode’s activation guide, which includes the big business checklist. It is a list of tips inspired by our fabulous guest, Kendra Jay Louis, to help you think and act big, even if you’re small. Print it! Then use it to remind yourself of what you must do to develop a big business mindset. If you’re ready to eliminate the beliefs and the behaviors limiting your growth, well this activation guide will help you.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

I wish I had that a few years ago.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

That is fabulous! To download it now, text the phrase One Next Step to 31996 or visit OneNextStepPodcast.com. When you request today’s guide, you’re also going to receive a summary of today’s episode, which includes key quotes and takeaways, and links to resources mentioned in the episode. Thank you so much for listening to this episode of One Next Step. We hope you enjoyed what you’re hearing from us, and now we want to hear from you. Head on over to Apple Podcast or Spotify or whatever your listening platform is and leave us a review. We created this podcast to help you lead your team and grow your business so guess what? We read every single one of them. Until next time, own your journey.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

It’s your life and your business. It’s up to you to create the life and organization you want. Join us next week for more practical tips and actionable tools to advance your business one step at a time. Start by making today count.

 

Speaker 2:

Thanks for listening to One Next Step. Be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or follow us on Spotify. Then join us next time for more practical business tips and tools to help you get more down throughout your business, and lead your team with confidence. For more episodes, show notes and helpful resources visit OneNextStepPodcast.com.

Download this episode’s activation guide, The Big Business Checklist, which is a list of tips inspired by our guest Kendra J. Lewis to help you think and act big even when you’re small. Print it. Then, use it to remind yourself of what you must do to develop a big business mindset. If you’re ready to eliminate the beliefs and behaviors limiting your growth, this activation guide will help you.

 

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Join us next episode when we talk with Scott Leese, author of the book Addicted to the Process and founder of Scott Leese Consulting and The Surf and Sales Summit. He’s a strategic advisor to companies around the world and was recently named one of the Top 25 Sales Leaders to Know. He’ll chat with us about how to go from small to incredibly successful.