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About This Episode

Whether you have a sales team or are in a sales role as a leader, you need to know how to overcome objections and pushback in the sales process. So how can you honor people’s objections while still closing the sale and delivering your product or service?

 

Today we’re going to talk about just that with Lisa Seal, BELAY’s VP of Revenue. Lisa has years of experience in growth management across several industries and various sales environments. She empowers our team at BELAY to really exceed their growth targets and has been instrumental in helping the organization grow – which, you might have guessed it, involves overcoming pushbacks and making sales!

1. The ‘who’ you are giving it to is more important than the ‘what’ you are giving.

Make it about them, not you or your brand. Send a handwritten note, not something automated from Amazon. Put their name or their family’s name on the gift. Make it truly special and recipient focused.

2. Give gifts that are unexpected.

The most meaningful gifts aren’t tied to an event or time of year (think 5 year work anniversary or Christmas). They are the ones the recipient had no idea were coming. They are the “just because” gifts. When gifts are tied yearly or timed events, they come from a sense of obligation, not gratefulness. Give gifts to your team and clients simply because you appreciate them – and catch them off guard when you give.

3. Build value first.

Most salespeople know not to come out of the gate with a price. That’s because, at that point, it’s just a sales transaction and you might have already lost a potential customer. Instead, show the value in what you are selling. How can it help them? Where does it fit into their experience? How does it address their needs? Show them all of these things before you ever discuss price.

 

How would you describe the strengths and weaknesses of your current sales process?
What are some of the red flags to spot a bad sales process? And how do you know when you are encountering a good one?
What is your initial response when you receive pushback to sales?
Talk about a client who initially pushed back but eventually became a trusted customer. 

Sales is all about the buyer and making sure their needs are being met first.

Lisa Seal

A healthy sales process focuses on hearing and understanding your buyer’s pain point.

Lisa Seal

A good salesperson can walk away when their solution doesn’t appropriately fill the need.

Lisa Seal

Always allow empathy to lead your conversation.

Lisa Seal

Lisa Seal on LinkedIn and BELAY’s website.

Tricia Sciortino on Instagram and LinkedIn.

Lisa Zeeveld on Instagram and LinkedIn.

BELAY Solutions

 

(02:25) Lisa talks about the country she would live in if she didn’t live in the U.S – and she talks about her mean guacamole recipe!

(04:35) Lisa shares her background and how she ended up at BELAY.

(06:22) Why are you so passionate about sales, and what attracted you to sales originally?

(08:05) “Sales isn’t as scary when it’s a product or service you believe in and you know is helping other people.”

(08:55) What does a healthy sales process look like?

(12:01) When you know you have a good solution for a prospect and you’re still getting pushback, how should you respond?

(13:14) “If you can’t overcome one of their objections, then you shake hands and walk away.”

(14:20) What role does empathy have in selling?

(16:22) Lisa talks about how to respond when a buyer thinks the product/service is too expensive and believes they can’t afford it. 

(17:45) Lisa explains the framework and processes her team uses to identify and overcome objections in sales. 

(19:33) Are there any differences from your perspective between B2B and B2C sales?

(20:57) Should you talk about dollars and price during the first conversation?

(22:14) Lisa talks about some stories of clients who initially objected but ended up being die-hard customers. 

(27:45) What would Lisa say about this subject to the solo entrepreneurs who are pulled in a million directions?

(29:00) Lisa promises to come back to the podcast to talk about how to set up compensation for a salesperson and/or team. 

(30:20) Today’s next step: Review your sales processes, and ask yourself these questions. How much is your potential client’s need or pain in the forefront of your processes? How do you make sure you approach your prospects respectfully and empathetically?

Lisa Seal:

Those are the stories that we would hear that, “I went on a date night with my wife for the first time in six months because I was able to step away.” And, that is for a salesperson to hear that, that’s the win. Most people think salespeople are coin operated and we certainly, we love a good competition, but really it’s those stories that you hear that just fills your heart. If you’re an empathetic servant hearted salesperson.

Speaker 1:

Welcome to One Next Step, the most practical business podcast in the world, helping you get more done, grow your business and lead your team with confidence, with tips and tools you didn’t get in business school. Here are your hosts, Tricia Sciortino and Lisa Zeeveld.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Welcome to One Next Step, I am LZ, COO and CFO of Belay, me and my co-host today, Tricia she’s out for the week. So I am holding it all down by myself for this episode. You know that Tricia and I have learned a lot throughout our careers. And this podcast is our way of sharing, what we’ve learned with you. Those experiences have helped us grow a 100% remote business from startup to now being recognized on the Inc 5,000 fastest growing companies list. Man, we have done some hard work around here. So for the One Next Step podcast, we want to bring you episodes filled with excellent content. We’re here to help you on your leadership journey and ultimately help you enjoy your life and your work.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Today, we’re getting into the nitty gritty of sales, specifically how you and your team can overcome objections in the sales process. I’m sure all of you entrepreneurs and leaders out there, you care about sales. And so that’s why I am super excited to bring to you Belay’s very own Vice President of Revenue, Lisa Seal. Lisa knows so much about this topic and she’s going to offer a wealth of information on how to push through objections and make your sales process better than ever. I know you’re going to love to hear what she has to say. So without a moment’s wait, let’s get started.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Hey Lisa.

Lisa Seal:

Hey, LZ.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Oh my goodness. We’re going to have so much fun.

Lisa Seal:

And it’ll be fun. I’m excited about this.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Good. Me too. so I want to open it up with a little fun icebreaker question. It’s just sort of a fun way for our listeners to get to know you better. So what country would you live in if you didn’t live in the United States of America?

Lisa Seal:

Well, that’s such a big question. I feel like, I have to commit. First thing that came to my mind is Mexico, because beach, guac and margaritas. I don’t think you can go wrong with that.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. We traveled there, Michael, the kids and I, a few years ago. It was actually on a cruise and we had one of those excursions, all day and we found this little place called Coconuts. It was like on the cliff of somewhere and it was delicious best guacamole. I still have not been able to replace the guacamole I had there.

Lisa Seal:

I love guac fresh in Mexico, there’s nothing like it.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. Do you make it yourself when you’re home?

Lisa Seal:

I do. I am the person that everybody asks for me to make the guacamole. So I think I’d have a pretty good guac. And I did learn from a cousin who married a Bolivian. And so it was his recipe.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I think that gives you credibility.

Lisa Seal:

I think it does. I feel like it does. And the fact that people ask for it, its got to be a good sign, right?

Lisa Zeeveld:

Okay. So I’m seeing the next retreat we have. I’m going to ask for you to make guacamole.

Lisa Seal:

Yes, I agree. It doesn’t travel well, but I can make it while we’re there.

Lisa Zeeveld:

You can make it fresh.

Lisa Seal:

Yeah, fresh.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And I’m going to give a secret away. You have also taught me how to make a delicious vodka gimlet.

Lisa Seal:

Yes, I have.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And now you’re hooked, I’m totally hooked.

Lisa Seal:

Since we’re talking about margaritas, if you replace the vodka with tequila, it’s kind of like a skinny margarita.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Oh, I need that in my life. Okay. I’m going to try that. Thank you.

Lisa Seal:

You’re welcome.

Lisa Zeeveld:

All right. Well, I want our listeners to, really hear your background because you’re going to give us so much great knowledge on sales today. And I know that whether as an entrepreneur or it’s somebody who’s a leader in an organization, the one thing that has to happen is sales, or you don’t have a business. So we are talking about to me, the golden nugget of importance today, sales. So can you just give us a little bit about your background and how you ended up at Belay?

Lisa Seal:

Yeah, I would love to. So my career has always been in consultative sales. I worked mostly in the construction industry and on the residential side. So it was very direct to consumer if you will, which is incredibly consultative when you’re talking about their home. And so that was the majority of my career prior to becoming a stay-at-home mom. I had a little brief hiatus as a stay-at-home mom, was not fully fulfilled as a stay-at-home mom. So I was an entrepreneur for a short time, had a small business and then decided it was time to go back out into the work world, once my kids were in school full-time.

Lisa Seal:

Did a brief consultative sales position in the political industry, which was fascinating, but it was pulling me away from home too much. And so I sought out to find a company that was different and I stumbled upon Belay and it was like a dream come true. I was able to really hone or use my sales skills and hone my leadership skills and truly found Belay to be a place that was easy to sell for. And eventually ended up leading the sales department and obviously the now client relations and sales department.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. VP of Revenue.

Lisa Seal:

Yeah. VP of Revenue. That’s why I have a money tree in my office, right.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I love that. So there’s not a lot of people, or maybe that’s too big of a generalization. I think there are a good amount of people who are scared by sales. And so they don’t think of going into that. So I would love to know why did you actually think sales was your calling? What was it about sales that interested you and continues to get you fired up? Because you love sales.

Lisa Seal:

I do. And I think it’s truly my philosophy about sales. So sales kind of can have a negative connotation to it. People hear salesperson and they get a little like, “Oh, boy.” And the defensiveness goes up and I have always felt very strongly that sales is all about making sure that the buyer needs are being met and that it’s okay if as a salesperson we’re not filling those needs to walk away. And it really comes from a place of certain hood. It’s a, I feel that if I have knowledge that could help somebody, it’s my duty to make sure that they know that that exists. And so that belief in that philosophy really pushed me into becoming a salesperson, especially in the Residential Construction Industry.

Lisa Seal:

I have a design background. And so for me, being able to design something and then sell them my company and why I would be the right person for them to choose, or the company that I represented to choose, I realized it really felt a need and there was a care there. I don’t think I knew that going in that I would be different than a lot of salespeople, especially in that industry. And as a young woman in a very male dominated field. But it did it filled that need, that was missing on the consumer side. And so, it really made me realize that my philosophy, there was something there to it. There was something different in it and it was powerful.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. So sales, maybe isn’t as scary when it’s a product or a service that you believe in.

Lisa Seal:

Right.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And that you know is helping other people. And I think sometimes that gets missed.

Lisa Seal:

Absolutely. I have been known to say that, people think it’s a compliment to here, “You could sell ice to an Eskimo.” To me that is the most incredible insult because, an Eskimo doesn’t need ice, and so why would you sell them ice? You should probably sell them some mittens.” That is really truly my philosophy. And if you do have somebody that, and we’ve all experienced it, a salesperson that is not listening to the need or the pain points and just pushing anyway, that’s when you lose people. And that’s what gives the career a negative vibe around it, I guess.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. So what does a healthy sales process look like? So say you are in love with that product or service, this is your calling. You really think that you can do a phenomenal job. I’m sure that there is a process which is healthy versus one that’s not. So what does that look like?

Lisa Seal:

Yeah, I would say it starts with discovery from both parties. So an unhealthy sales process is just, “Here’s what I do. And you should buy it.” Versus a healthy process is, “Tell me why you’ve reached out? Or tell me what your pain point is?” And truly hearing it, understanding it. And the sales person needs to determine if their solution actually fills that need in that void that the buyer has. That starts it off in a healthy place. And if you don’t do that, then it’s just, feature preaching. You’re just telling them all the wonderful things that you can do. And you’re not listening to whether that actually matters to the buyer or not. So first and foremost, that is the absolute, most important part, you cannot skip it. You need to know that there’s a need and you have a solution. And that those two things align.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right. That’s good. Feature preaching.

Lisa Seal:

Not so good.

Lisa Zeeveld:

No. I think everybody wants to run away from those people.

Lisa Seal:

Yes, absolutely, no doubt about it. Nobody wants to be preached to, nobody, people want to be heard. They want to know that the person that they’re sharing their pain points with are listening and really determining whether they really have the solution or not. And if they don’t, that’s okay. It’s not anyone’s fault. It’s just recognizing that early on. If you can do that and get through a sales process where you’ve really keep that at the, the pain point at the center of the conversation, the agreement part and the signature is easy. Because you’ve determined it together that it’s a good fit.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. Well, and I just think about, there’s so many problems, right, or tensions in a business that needs solutions. And so for the person on the buying side to not have somebody that’s willing to listen to them and help them solution it, is frustrating, right?

Lisa Seal:

Yes.

Lisa Zeeveld:

It’s like a lot of time going from person to person, and all they want to do is talk about themselves and they don’t understand that I have a real problem. And so I think that that can be another hurdle to get over for somebody who is looking to get into sales, or maybe an entrepreneur who that’s not their gifting is to realize that if you listen, that you’re actually helping them. If you don’t do it in the right way, then you’re missing a great opportunity to make a difference in their life and in their business.

Lisa Seal:

Absolutely. Yeah. It is detrimental to not, for a sale, we always say, ‘You have two ears and one mouth for a reason.” It’s an old sales say and it’s true. They need to truly listen before they start preaching their features. And its important to preach features, but you need to make sure that they actually aligned with the need of the person you’re speaking with.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. So what if, you’re the sales person and you know that you’ve got a great solution, but you’re kind of getting a little bit of pushback. You’re getting some objections, how do you handle that?

Lisa Seal:

Well, I shouldn’t be surprised at the objections. So the first thing I would say is bring them out front. That’s the whole reason we’re having this conversation is to find the pain point and find why they haven’t fixed that pain point yet? What has led them to you or your business that they’ve not fixed it? And so what’s held them back? Uncovering if it’s a budget, uncovering if it’s a fear, uncovering if they just didn’t know where to look so, that you then can direct the sales conversation to that actual issue. It kind of helps you format the conversation that you’re about to have with somebody. Again, it goes back to that feature preaching where you’re just spilling information that may not be valuable to the person you’re talking to, if you haven’t uncovered the objections in the first place.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right. Yeah. And I would assume that if you’re good at what you’re doing and there’s an objection that you can’t overcome, it’s not the right solution for them.

Lisa Seal:

Exactly. Yeah. If you can’t overcome one of their objections.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And that’s kind of liberating, right?

Lisa Seal:

Then you shake hands and walk away.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right. Yes, yes. And I feel like that’s where a lot of young salespeople get caught up. Like, “Oh.” They feel defeated because they weren’t able to close that deal. Where really, if you’ve done your job well, and you don’t have what they need, that’s not your fault. Just the product or the service doesn’t serve them well, go find somebody, it does serve well.

Lisa Seal:

Yeah. And that is a challenge in a salesperson’s life because most salespeople are pretty driven and competitive. And when you lose somebody, quote unquote, it feels like you’ve done something wrong. When a salesperson can mature to the point where they realize that it isn’t a personal loss, that it’s easy to move past it and get to the next one that might be the right client for you. But I do think that there’s a maturity level, that it takes a sales person to get to, to be able to get past that. And not hold things like things like that personally.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. How do you feel like empathy plays in selling?

Lisa Seal:

It’s everything. So without empathy, you’re not finding out those objections. You’re not finding out the pain points, you’re again, just telling them how you can do all these things for them, but you’re not again, stopping and pausing long enough to actually listen to the person and then sharing with them that, “That must be really hard, and I’m sorry, you’re experiencing that. And this is how we can help you.” And truly being in a place of feeling for this person, because they’re coming to you because they have a need or a pain point. And so it is important that the sales person, feel not just show it, but really feel that empathy, because if you don’t feel it and you’re showing it, the person on the other end of the call or in that meeting, it’s going to know. That has to be checked with.

Tricia Sciortino:

Look, work and life don’t have to be so hard. That’s why Belay wants to make it easy and fun, all while catering to you and your needs, because we know you work to live and not the other way around.

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s also why Inc Magazine, Entrepreneur Magazine, The Atlanta Business Chronicle and Flex Jobs have all recognized Belay as one of the best places to work.

Lisa Seal:

With 10 years of successfully being a 100% remote organization, Belay recognizes that maybe you want to pick up your kids after school every day. Maybe you prefer to work on your own schedule. Maybe you’re an empty nester who wants more flexibility and Belay offers that flexibility.

Lisa Zeeveld:

So whether you’re a virtual assistant, bookkeeper, social media strategist, or website specialist, Belay has clients right now who need your expertise and insight.

Lisa Seal:

You can have a meaningful career working from home while being present and available for loved ones. And it starts with Belay.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And how about, when it say a price objection. I would assume there’s sort of two sides of that, number one, they just think it’s too expensive or number two when they can’t afford it.

Lisa Seal:

Yeah. Two different things.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Okay.

Lisa Seal:

So, if the buyer thinks it’s too expensive, then you haven’t built value, you haven’t uncovered the objections and the alternative to those objections. So if somebody gives you an objection and the salesperson ultimately gets to the place of, “Well, what if you don’t fix this? What if you don’t fill this gap? What then?” And if there is another solution, that’s okay. But if what you’re offering actually is the right thing, they’ll come to that conclusion on their own versus, “I don’t have the budget for this.” That’s different.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

Lisa Seal:

“I don’t have the budget for this.” Then a good salesperson says, “Here are some solutions that are similar to ours that are on a lesser price scale that you might want to start with. And we look forward to someday being able to serve you as your business grows.” And being okay with that. And again, being able to move on, you’ve made a friend, they will respect you. And I’ll tell you when they can afford you, they will be back.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. And I would assume that there’s a little bit of maybe a prequalification that goes into some of that too.

Lisa Seal:

Sure. Yeah.

Lisa Zeeveld:

In what you’re doing. Is there a framework that your team uses or like I said, a processes that help you identify and maybe overcome some objections or hurdles in the sales process?

Lisa Seal:

Sure. So when they identify a lead or a prospect, the first thing that they’re doing is some healthy cyber-stalking, we’ll call it. So that’s LinkedIn, looking at their business website, trying to get a feel for what they’ve done in their business so far. We may not know the size of the business, we may not know many details about the business, but you can tell from their LinkedIn connections or their summary on LinkedIn to kind of get an idea of where they’re at in their business. We’re still going to talk to anyone because you just never know what you’re actually seeing and how clear it is, and what you’re finding online. But it does help them kind of tee up how the conversation may go. So when you’re starting a conversation with somebody, you’re going to say, “I’ve looked at your website, I’ve read your story.”

Lisa Seal:

And it, again, tease, it makes one that the consumer feel like, “Oh, I matter. You’ve looked into me, that means something to me.” And two, it kind of helps you tee up, maybe it’s an industry that you speak directly about, or the role of the person’s in to speak directly to. So if we see somebody come through who is a CFO, we know what that conversation is probably going to be about and where the points are often aligned with other clients that we have as CFOs.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. CFOs are awesome.

Lisa Seal:

Their amazing.

Lisa Zeeveld:

So that sounds good for B2B, right? It’s somebody who’s maybe professional and has some social media or some credibility that you’re able to look at, but because of your background, I want to dive in for our listeners who might be, B to C. So thinking back to your days of when you were in home construction, how could somebody prepare themselves for that conversation and maybe prepare themselves for any objections?

Lisa Seal:

Yeah. I honestly don’t see it as much different. It’s actually probably more emotional, right?

Lisa Zeeveld:

Oh, yeah.

Lisa Seal:

So unless you’re talking to an entrepreneur, their business is their baby, a homeowner, their home is their baby. There’s an emotional attachment versus talking to a leader in an organization unless they have an owner’s mindset or a founder’s mindset, they’re not as emotionally attached. So again, making sure that empathy is leading the conversation even more so with that, whether it’s a homeowner or the consumer in general. And I actually don’t see entrepreneurs is any different than that.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Okay, good. So maybe even like a prequalification could be, I would assume there’s some demographics maybe in like a zip code, a particular neighborhood. And so that you’re not kind of walking in blindly before you start talking to them and maybe even asking questions right, on those first sales calls me. Do you ever start talking about dollars and cents during the first conversation?

Lisa Seal:

Typically not. Typically not. No.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Okay. So you all, can’t see it, but she immediately started shaking her head, “No.”

Lisa Seal:

No, you have to build value first. If you lead with the price, you’re basically saying, “Can go afford me?” And that is not a nice way to start a conversation.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Okay.

Lisa Seal:

In it’s simple as terms, if you were treated that way, walking into a store in a mall, it would be so offensive.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I’m thinking of, what was the movie? Pretty Woman, right.

Lisa Seal:

Yes, “Big mistake.”

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s right. She goes back and she’s like, “Big, big mistake.” I love that.

Lisa Seal:

Yes. You have to feel value first, and you may recognize in the conversation that their eyes were getting bigger and they realize, “Well this might be more than I thought it was going to be.” And to get to the price quicker to relieve them of that pain that they’re feeling that’s okay. But to lead with it would be offensive.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. Okay. So this is where I want to tap into some of your stories. Okay, we don’t want to name names, we don’t want to drag anybody out here, but do you have any fun stories that you could share with us about maybe a client that you had to overcome some objections and now they’re like thrilled that they bought your service?

Lisa Seal:

Oh gosh. Yes, lots. And actually pre pandemic, that was a lot of our sales calls because the idea of working remotely or having somebody work remotely for you was not the norm. And so we had to overcome that the work remote part of our service at Belay, that it took a long time, the emotional attachment to having somebody in your office, especially as administrative assistant, the old school, desk sitting right outside of the leader’s office. People have to get past that emotional picture that they have in their head. And so our sales cycle was much longer because of that. And we would have people that we went to talk to for months, even years, that loved the idea, but just couldn’t get themselves past that emotional hurdle and just trying. And, when we do have, we have those clients that come back around and sign and you hear back from them three months later, “I cannot believe it took me this long, shame on me. This has been amazing. And you’re right, it works.”

Lisa Seal:

Now post pandemic. Obviously everybody had to work remotely for a hot minute there. And they saw that it worked and people loved it, especially when it comes to administrative support. You actually don’t need them in the office. We all work on a computer. And quite honestly, most of our clients were remote anyway because they were traveling all the time, whether their assistant was sitting in the office or not, it didn’t matter. So I would say that’s the most common story, especially here at Belay, was that the emotional hurdle that they needed to get past for remote work was huge.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. I just think about the opportunities that I get when we go to conferences or we happen to meet a client, right. And, we’re not the cheapest on the market, I’m going to say it right now. And we don’t plan to ever be that way we know we have a great service. And so for a lot of our small businesses, it’s a big jump, right. To pay for this service, but when you, and so that took him a while, like you said that three to four months, when they’re thinking about it, “Do I want to, really invest in this?” But when you see them later on a year later, you can almost physically tell the difference of, they are so much happier because they reached out on a whim and said, “I might need help.”

Lisa Zeeveld:

And they were matched with a sales team that was really empathetic, listened to them and helped find the right solution. Because just because they’re calling doesn’t mean if they reach out to your business, doesn’t mean they know all your services or the packages you offer all those things, but they have relief and whatever, the reason why it could have been extra time with family, it could have just been to scale their business higher or all of those. But they feel that. And I think as a salesperson that has to be so gratifying.

Lisa Seal:

Oh, it’s amazing. We were at a conference not long ago and had a couple of clients walk up to us and say, “I went on the first vacation with my family without being in my inbox for the first time in six years.” And literally tears welling up in their eyes because this was life changing for them. And part of that hurdle that we talked about, it wasn’t just the remote part. It was, everybody thinks they need full time. And because our service is fractional, they don’t realize that 15 hours a week actually is life-changing and really affordable, when you realize you didn’t actually have to hire that full-time employee, anyway.

Lisa Seal:

So yes, those are the stories that we would hear that, “I went on a date night with my wife for the first time in six months because I was able to step away.” And, that is for a salesperson to hear that, that’s the win. Most people think salespeople are coin operated and we certainly, we love a good competition, but really it’s those stories that you hear that just fills your heart, if you’re an empathetic servant hearted salesperson.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. And if you have a great marketing team or you’re able to outsource your marketing, capturing those stories into white papers and case studies really do become a great tool for your sales team or for you, if you’re the person that’s selling right now, for you to be able to leverage. So that what you’re selling to the person or the product, they can see real life stories of how it makes a difference in other people’s lives.

Lisa Seal:

Exactly. It’s the new testimonial, right. I think that everybody caught on… Nobody puts a bad testimonial on their website. But a case study is different, it’s somebody’s story, it’s their, why they came to you? It’s how it changed their life? And it’s thoughtful, and we do it, we have a lot of them and they’re fun to share. And they’re fun to read too.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well. We know that we have some entrepreneurs just like I said, who maybe they are the owner, they’re the chief bottle washer. They are also the salesperson and they don’t have a team. And so they’re working through the day to day of closing deals and making sales pitches. We like to say here in the One Next Step, that we’re the most practical business podcast. So we always love to leave our listeners with something that they can take away and maybe implement immediately. Perhaps they’re listening to this in the car on their way to a sales call, what would you tell them?

Lisa Seal:

I would tell them if they’re on their way to a sales call, who is in their inbox? And I would say, you probably need Belay VA first, because I’d be a terrible salesperson, if I didn’t say that, right?

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right, good.

Lisa Seal:

But then I would say that, they need to really stop and ask themselves if they are the right sales person for their business? Are they able to grow their business internally? If they’re focusing on adding additional clients and not really making sure that the business is operating at its healthiest. Because if you’re doing nothing but sales calls, then who’s running the business? And so really it is the first big investment any entrepreneurs should be doing if they want to grow, if they really want to grow their business as allows somebody who’s a professional salesperson, who’s out there, truly speaking about your product with an empathetic servant hearted mindset.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. I love that. Okay. Well, I actually feel like you kind of teed us up for a future episode. I’m going to say it, maybe you’ll come back. Maybe I have a little bit of emotional capital there that I could hold onto, but I think too, I would imagine somebody right now is saying, “How can I afford them?” So maybe would you come back and actually talk about how to set up maybe a compensation for a sales team?

Lisa Seal:

I would love to.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I think you do a beautiful job here at Belay, but I think that our listeners would appreciate that. And it seems like something, if there’s kind of worried about giving that away, I’m sure as a business owner, it’s like, “How do I afford that person?” So we’d love to have you back.

Lisa Seal:

I would love to.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. Well, thank you, Lisa. This is so good. I know it’s been hugely valuable for me to hear your passion on selling and again, you do a phenomenal job of leading our revenue teams, our customer service account managers, as well as our sales team. So thank you, thank you so much for all that you do within Belay. And thank you for joining me today.

Lisa Seal:

Absolutely. Thanks you for having me.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well, I don’t know about you guys, but Lisa was phenomenal. I love talking with sales people, sales leaders who love sales, because I don’t know about you guys, but I meet a lot of entrepreneurs who are just a little fearful of sales, right. We all have our skillsets, our talents, and we start a business. We create an idea from it, but sometimes it’s really hard to figure out how to get that in the market and how to sell it. And Lisa’s wisdom was just golden for me. So today’s next step, you all, I’m going to make it really, really simple because what I want you to do is to go back and review your sales processes. Maybe you don’t even have a process, maybe this is the encouragement for you to actually write down your process. And I want you to read through it once you have it written down and see is your current sales process putting the pain or the need of your prospect in the forefront, or is it all about you?

Lisa Zeeveld:

Because, your prospects don’t want it to be all about you. They want it to be all about them. So are your current processes or the process you’re going to create putting that pain and that need in the forefront? Also, I want you to ask yourself, are you making a process or is your current process respecting your prospects and are you really talking to them and listening empathetically? Because that was another good takeaway for me today, was that sales needs to be empathetic. You really do need to listen. Lisa said it, “God gave you two ears and one mouth.” And we should all take that as a guide to how much we need to listen in our everyday lives, but definitely if you are out there selling your product or your services. So again, thank you, Lisa, for sharing all that good stuff and listeners, please stop right now. Stop what you’re doing. If you’re in the car, write a note to yourself, do a voice message and go back and really think through your sales processes and add back in that empathetic step right there.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Next step guys, I don’t want you to miss a moment of these amazing nuggets of wisdom. So if you would please go to our, your favorite application that you listened to all of our podcasts and I want you to subscribe for us, because you will get a notification that tells you each time we upload a new episode, and I don’t want you to miss any of the goodness. We’ve got some fantastic ones coming your way. And if you would like to access today’s show notes, visit OneNextStepPodcast.com. Again, that’s OneNextStepPodcast.com, you’ll get access to the notes and we’re going to make sure that you keep moving forward. So as always, thank you for joining me and us. We hope today’s episode has encouraged you to have more fun at work and fuse fun into your company culture, and definitely add some empathy and better listening skills to your sales processes, all right. And until next time, lead wisely and lead well. Start by making today.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Guys, you don’t want to miss next week’s episode when we’ll be joined by Lydia Fenet, the Global Managing Director and Lead Benefit Auctioneer at Christie’s Auction House. We’ll be talking about finding your voice, owning your power and the art of persuasion. Here’s a peek into what you’ll hear.

Lydia Fenet:

Every time you go in for a negotiation, if they’re rejecting the price you’re giving then, they’re rejecting the business, they’re not rejecting you. Even if there is a service, you are selling, it is the business they are rejecting, not you. And I think that, that keeps people from asking. I think that’s what gets people tongue tied and we’ve all seen it firsthand. So that I think is really, that’s where people fall short time and time again.

Speaker 1:

Thanks for listening to One Next Step. Be sure to subscribe on Apple podcasts or follow us on Spotify, then join us next time for more practical business tips and tools to help you get more done, grow your business and lead your team with confidence. For more episodes, show notes and helpful resources, visit OneNextStepPodcast.com.

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