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The 7 Accelerants of Personal Growth

Whitney is generously giving away five copies of her new book “Disrupt Yourself” to our listeners. Enter to win a copy by subscribing to the One Next Step email or text list. We will randomly select five subscribers to win a book over the next seven days.

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About This Episode

Many leaders are so busy with the day-to-day of running their business that they take little time to invest in themselves and their teams. Whitney Johnson has seen that throughout her career and now helps leaders spend more time focusing on personal and team growth. 

Whitney is the CEO of Disruption Advisors, an Inc. 5000 2020 fastest-growing private company in America, one of the 50 leading business thinkers in the world as named by Thinkers50, and the host of the popular podcast Disrupt Yourself. In this episode, Whitney talks with Tricia about why leaders don’t invest in their teams and how to get started.

1. Take the right kinds of risks.

Ask yourself, “How am I moving about the world in a way that I’m focused on creating, not competing.” Amateurs compete. Professionals create.

2. Sometimes, we need to take a step back to step forward.

When we disrupt ourselves in this way, whether it’s personally or professionally, people might question what we’re doing. That’s okay. Believe in yourself. Tricia took a step back in her career to go home and take care of her kids, then she came back into a totally different career and grew even more.

3. Stop and slow down.

Too many of us don’t know how to rest and take a break. For some, the pandemic has only made this more-so. Make sure you are taking time in your life to rest, get away from work and the busyness of life. If you want to grow personally, rest has to be a part of the equation.

 

What are your thoughts on the 7 accelerants?
Which accelerant resonates with you most?
Do you struggle with one more than the others?
Where do you believe you fit on the S curve when it comes to personal growth?

Personal disruption is about stepping back from who you are to slingshot into who you want to be.

Whitney Johnson

If you can give people an opportunity to grow, they will stay with you.

Whitney Johnson

There is real discomfort that comes when we actually stop and slow down.

Whitney Johnson

Amateurs compete and professionals create.

Whitney Johnson

(01:24) Whitney talks about the most surprisingly useful item she’s bought this year. 

(03:02) Why do organizations not invest in their team members?

(05:35) What factors lead to growth for those of us who invest in our teams? Whitney walks through the 7 accelerants of personal growth. 

(10:19) Do you see any common struggles or successes with one of these accelerants?

(16:16) So many people have experienced burnout over the last two years. Take some time for yourself. 

(18:30) We don’t know how to rest and how to take a break. We need to stop and slow down. 

(19:29) What is the S Curve Insight?

(21:56) What advice does Whitney have for the person who tries to focus on too many goals at one time?

(23:57) What is a great first step someone can take to start investing in themselves right now?

(26:45) This week’s one next step: Whitney is generously giving away five copies of “Disrupt Yourself” to our listeners. Enter to win a copy by subscribing to the One Next Step email or text list. We’ll randomly select five subscribers to win a book over the next seven days.

Tricia Sciortino:

So I do think there’s some element of guilt, but I know for me and perhaps this for other people, we don’t actually know how to rest. We don’t know how to take a break. So there’s some element of learning involved in this and real discomfort of actually stopping and slowing down.

Speaker 2:

Welcome to One Next Step, the most practical business podcast in the world. Helping you get more done, grow your business and lead your team with confidence with tips and tools you didn’t get in business school. Here are your hosts, Tricia Sciortino and Lisa Zeeveld.

Tricia Sciortino:

Welcome to One Next Step, the practical business podcast that helps you run your business so it stops running. I’m Tricia. And today, we’re going to talk about something near and dear to my heart, personal growth. And joining us is Whitney Johnson. Now, Whitney is the CEO of human capital consultancy Disruption Advisors, an Inc 5000 2020 fastest-growing private company in America. Congratulations. She is also the award-winning author of Disrupt Yourself and the host of the Disrupt Yourself podcast. I can’t wait to talk to you, Whitney about investing in yourself and your team. So welcome to the podcast.

Whitney Johnson:

Oh, thank you Tricia. I am delighted to be here.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, it is a joy, but before we get started, I have a fun question, a little icebreaker question if you will, for you. So what is the most surprisingly useful item you’ve bought this year, personally or professionally? Like, surprisingly useful.

Whitney Johnson:

All right. Can I be disruptive?

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, please. I expect you to be disruptive.

Whitney Johnson:

I’m going to be disruptive and give you two items.

Tricia Sciortino:

Okay. I love it.

Whitney Johnson:

So the first is L’ange L-‘-A-N-G-E blow dryer.

Tricia Sciortino:

Oh, okay.

Whitney Johnson:

It is fantastic. It’s like this really big brush, and so then you blow your hair dry and it looks halfway decent. You don’t actually have to go to the salon, although you still want to go to the salon.

Tricia Sciortino:

For other reasons.

Whitney Johnson:

Yes. It is a surprisingly useful purchase. And the second surprisingly useful purchase, Hint Water. And the reason it’s useful, is because in the afternoon when I am tired and I want to start eating M&Ms or chocolate chips, I can drink Hint Water and that is useful to my waistline.

Tricia Sciortino:

Okay. So is Hint Water injected with what? What’s in there?

Whitney Johnson:

It’s nothing. It’s just water with a hint of fruit flavor and it’s just very satisfying.

Tricia Sciortino:

Okay. Okay. I love it. Hint Water and a very fancy… How do you say the blow dryer again?

Whitney Johnson:

L’ange.

Tricia Sciortino:

L’ange.

Whitney Johnson:

L-‘-A-N-G-E.

Tricia Sciortino:

Okay. I’m going to have to look it up. I love that. I love those tips, thanks for sharing. I love it so much. Speaking of investing in our hair, let’s talk about… And investing in our lives, right? Let’s talk about investing in ourselves and our teams. This, I feel like, is so unfortunately common, that we run into people or organizations that aren’t investing in their teams regularly. Do you see this often out there, Whitney?

Whitney Johnson:

Yes. All the time. All the time.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes. So what do you say to these people?

Whitney Johnson:

Well, first of all, I say to myself, “Whitney, you need to do it.” So I look at it and I think, “Okay, so why don’t we do it?” And I think one of the reasons we don’t do it, is it doesn’t occur to us. So if you think about as we go throughout school, we’re not rewarded for investing in other people. We’re rewarded for getting tasks done over and over again. “Did you complete this assignment? Did you complete that assignment? Did you complete the other assignment?” And so we’re programmed to get things done.

Whitney Johnson:

And so when we look at our list of things to do, on our list, is things, not people. So I think that’s the first thing is it just doesn’t occur to us. And the second reason I think we don’t invest, is it’s really hard. I would much rather do a task that you get this completion of, “I just checked off this task.” And investing in people and figuring out what they want to do, what their dreams are, and what their aspirations are. And how to help them accomplish that and how that intersects with what you’re trying to accomplish. It’s just a lot more complicated and challenging. And so when we are wanting to do something easy, investing in people does not make it to the top of the list. So it doesn’t occur to us and it’s not easy to do.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, absolutely. And I see that happen a lot when I look at rising leaders or people who believe they want to become leaders, or that maybe their goal is to be a manager. And we have like a manager acceleration program here at BELAY that we facilitate for our teams. And so many times, we find out that you have excellent doers, people who are great doers, operators, and taskers who think they want to lead until they realize that leading is actually undoing, not doing. The opposite of doing. It is all the peopling and not the doing. And we’ve actually seen some people walk away and say, “Nevermind, not for me.” So affirming, yes. So for those of us who do invest in our teams, what would you say are the factors that eventually lead to growth? I know you have seven accelerants of growth. Could you help us talk through what some of that is?

Whitney Johnson:

Yeah, absolutely. Because we do know, even though it doesn’t occur to us to do and we also know it’s hard to do, we also know that when we invest in our teams, when people feel like there is upside, there’s growth potential, it’s a really strong predictor of how long they’re going to stay working for you. We know that people fire bosses, they don’t fire companies. And so if you can give people an opportunity to grow, they will stay with you. So what we have devised, is a framework of personal disruption. It’s based on the work that I did with Clayton Christensen at Harvard Business School. And it’s this mechanism by which if you’re willing to disrupt yourself, basically step back from who you are to slingshot forward, you are going to grow. And so the framework is this. Number one, is take the right kinds of risk and taking the right kinds of risks at its simplest if you think about it for you as an individual is, “How am I moving about the world in a way that I am focused on creating, not competing?”

Whitney Johnson:

So amateurs compete and professionals create. So that’s the first thing is, “How do I focus on creation?” Number two, is play to your distinctive strengths. Focus not only on what you do well, but what you do uniquely and idiosyncratically well. And when you feel strong, because you’re playing to your strengths, then you’re going to be willing to play where other people aren’t playing. You have this flywheel effect of being able to move forward, and to grow, and accelerate that growth. The third thing is to embrace your constraints. So when you have people working for you who say, “Well, I need more time. I need more budget. I need more buy-in from my colleagues.” Actually, we need constraints.

Whitney Johnson:

We know that in fact, constraints are what give us the friction that we need something to bounce up against we need in order to create. And so a great example of that, is skateboarders are some of the quickest learners in the world. And why? Because they receive incredibly fast and useful feedback. Every action, every move has an immediate consequence, and so that’s the constraint. And if you look back at the last 18 months, you will discover that whatever you really accomplished in a big way, probably there were constraints involved. So, that’s number three. Number four, is to examine your expectations. So this is whenever we decide to start something new, we have these expectations of how things are going to be, “They are going to be wonderful.” And then we find ourselves using the word “should, should, should”. And when we start using the word “should”, what we’re doing is there’s a gap between our reality and expectations and we’re competing with what’s happening instead of creating with what’s happening.

Whitney Johnson:

And so we want to examine our expectations because when we manage those, we’re managing our dopamine. And when we manage our dopamine, we’re focused on what we’re going to do not being a victim of what is. Number five, step back in order to grow. And I mean that in the sense of sometimes, you need to do things that are lateral inside of your organization, sometimes in your personal life. When you become a parent, that’s a big step back in order to grow as a human being. And then there’s also stepping back of taking time to rest and reflect, to sleep and to go on a vacation. Because we know when you take a break, your productivity increases. Number six, give failure it’s due.

Whitney Johnson:

To leverage failure whenever we make a mistake, a failure turns out to be a constraint, which is a tool of creation. And then number seven is to be driven by discovery, to take a step forward, to gather feedback, and adapt. And you put all seven of those accelerants together, and those constitute this framework of personal disruption. And when you will use that as a mechanism, you are going to be able to grow much faster. Because as I said a moment ago, you’re stepping back from who you are to slingshot into who you want to be. And a manager who makes that possible will have people who will want to work for them forever.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, absolutely. Those are some impressive seven steps, or accelerators for personal growth. I resonate with a ton of them just hearing you talk about what they mean and how they’ve helped me in my career, or you can see maybe where people have gaps or work so well in one area or the other. Have you seen common struggles when it comes to these? In your coaching with all of the leaders that you work for, do you find that those organizations that there’s a handful of these that are really resonating, whether it’s worldwide, nationwide, or organizationally that really stand out to you as pinnacles?

Whitney Johnson:

Yeah. So first of all, Tricia, I have to say, my little open loop is going in my brain and I want to know which one of these you’ve applied. Does something come to mind?

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. First and foremost, stepping back to step forward is a huge one that resonated with me. Only because I feel like that’s actually something I’ve witnessed be success for me in my life. And so my quick version of that, is I had a very successful career and then I had children, I decided to leave that career and take a step back because I wanted to be a present parent. And in the act of doing that, it wound up boomeranging me into a new career that was unanticipated and I could have never dreamed would’ve happened. Which then led me to where I am today. It led me to BELAY, it led me to working remotely. Which if I kept on the path I was on before in my career pre-children, I would never be where I am today. So I’ve kind of watched that show up in my life as truly being life-changing, career changing.

Tricia Sciortino:

And then the one on the other side, is using failure, looking at it as a constraint. And that constraint is a positive thing. And so I don’t know that I naturally think that way. I think failure is, I beat myself up and of course I want to get to the place where I’ve learned something from it, there’s a lesson in everything. And I think having that perspective is necessary to be a great leader because most of the time, we’re failing. Most of the time, we’re making a wrong decision. And gosh, if we let that get to us and if we let self-doubt creep in, then we’re holding ourselves back. So I think to your point, letting failure and constraint be part of the success process is huge. And I feel like it’s something that happens cyclically and all the time. And I love it. So those are the ones that stuck out to me, yes.

Whitney Johnson:

I love it.

Tricia Sciortino:

Monumental in my life.

Whitney Johnson:

So on your career, what I loved about that, is that I suspect when you left the one career to go be a full-time lead parent, people looked at you and thought you had lost your mind. And so I want to just call that out is that oftentimes, when we do take that step back, when we disrupt ourselves, it there’s some part of the equation to most people that does not make sense. And it’s because there’s another job that needs to be done, an emotional job. Something that we want to do and we also believe that the trajectory of our life… If right now, the slope of your line is over one up one, over one up one, you take that step back, you disrupt yourself. Because you believe in the future that your life will be over one up three and over one up five of, “Yes, I will have a career again. And yes, I want to be a mother. And yes, I want to have relationships.” And so your overall life is much more powerful.

Whitney Johnson:

Now, to answer your question. I think one of the ones that people are actually really struggling with right now, is stepping back to grow. And not so much from a standpoint of mobility, people are actually willing to do that. They’re willing to take that step back from a career of the great resignation. That’s stepping back to grow.

Tricia Sciortino:

It’s real. Yeah.

Whitney Johnson:

But the one that people are struggling with is, “Am I taking time to rest? Am I taking time to reflect? Am I taking a vacation?” And so those are the ones that are showing up right now where people aren’t quite figuring out how to do that. I think COVID put us on hyper-alert and, “If I will work all the time at some level, then everything will be okay.” And so we’re having to figure out, “Well, what does it look like to take a break?” And there’s this one wonderful quote from Tiffany Shlain, she wrote the book 24/6 and she advocates for a technology Shabbat. But what she says, is she describes rest as a technology. She says, “The promise of technology is that you’re going to be more productive, you’ll get more done. And isn’t that what rest does? So what if we thought of rest as a technology?” And I think that’s really encouraging as a way to help us take that time to step back in order to move forward.

Tricia Sciortino:

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Speaker 4:

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Tricia Sciortino:

I think the last 18 months… Honestly, we’re creeping up on two years at this point. But I have never seen so much fatigue and burnout in people in my life. And it’s not even necessarily all career-driven, it’s just life burnout, life exhaustion, mental strain, so much burnout and fatigue in everybody. So I agree with you. It’s really hard to get people to disconnect and step away. Personally, I haven’t experienced. My sister, love her to death. We’re great friends, we live in the same community. We’ve grown up together, our kids grow up together. Girl does not know how to take a spa day or take a vacation. I’m constantly encouraging her, “Take a minute, take time for you. Step back. Like, how are you taking care of yourself?” It’s like, “No, the kids. No, it’s dinner. No, the husband. No, the job. No, the laundry. No, the…” It’s the thing after the thing after the thing. And I was like, “Oh gosh, but where’s their time for you and you’re very empty cup?”

Whitney Johnson:

Oh, your cup.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, “Your cup is so empty. Fill your cup.” And so I’m with you. I think people have so much guilt about, “But if I stop, who’s going to do it?” And I think the realization, is actually, some things you can stop doing and nobody will even notice they’ve stopped being done. It only matters to you, it’s in your mind. Take a break.

Whitney Johnson:

And Tricia, I do think there’s some element of guilt, but I’m also wondering if… I know back in January, our family took a vacation. And I actually ended up writing a piece about this. So if anybody wants to download it, they can. It’s whitneyjohnson.com/vacation. And here’s why. Because I am terrible at taking vacations. Why am I terrible at taking vacations? Because it’s going somewhere that I haven’t been, it’s doing something I haven’t done, sometimes with people I haven’t done it with because I don’t spend all day long with my family. I’m doing work most of the day. And so I realized, “Oh, going on vacation is really uncomfortable. I’m disrupting myself when I go on vacation.” So I do think there’s some element of guilt, but I know for me and perhaps this is for other people, we don’t actually know how to rest. We don’t know how to take a break. So there’s some element of learning involved in this and real discomfort of actually stopping and slowing down.

Tricia Sciortino:

Absolutely. Like I know for me, there’s only one place in the world I can actually feel like I’m at peace and rest. And it’s at a beach by myself.

Whitney Johnson:

Yes.

Tricia Sciortino:

Alone. Without a phone. Without a phone. Me, myself, the beach, and a book. That to me, is rest. That’s about it.

Whitney Johnson:

What’s a book that you would be reading?

Tricia Sciortino:

I’m still old school love a book. Like I’m still the girl… I have refused to get a Kindle, I just refuse. I just love touching… I want something that’s not electronic. I want a book. Anyway, that’s awesome. Okay. So you talk about another thing. I’m going to shift gears. Well, related, unrelated. Talk to me about this S curve insight. What is the S curve?

Whitney Johnson:

Okay. Well, I’ve been skating around this idea. So now for anybody who’s listening, they’ll say, “Oh, this is now coming together.” As I was investing with Clayton Christensen and I had big “aha”, that disruption isn’t just about products, it’s about people. I had a second big insight and that was that the S curve that people typically use to figure out how quickly an innovation will be adopted, could help us understand how we learn and how we grow. And so everybody who’s listening, if you want to just trace an S with your finger at the bottom and say to yourself, “Every time I start something new, I start a new job. I go on a vacation. I am at the bottom of that S and growth is happening, but it’s not apparent. And so it’s going to be awkward and uncomfortable, and I’m going to get impatient and frustrated. And guess what? This is normal. It feels slow.” But then you’re going to put in the effort and you’re going to accelerate into the sweet spot.

Whitney Johnson:

And this is where it’s hard, but it’s not too hard and it’s easy, but it’s not too easy. So all your neurons are firing. You feel exhilarated and everything feels fast. And so now, I’m outlining for you. This is the emotional journey that you have when you’re growing. And then you get to the top of that S and you’ve figured stuff out. You know what you’re doing. And you’re also a little bit bored. And so what looks like a plateau can become a precipice. So when you get to the top of an S curve, you either need to say to yourself, “Is this a summit?” Not the summit and keep climbing. Or you need to find a new S curve to jump to.

Whitney Johnson:

And so we have this growth cycle that we want to complete. And this now, you’ve got this model. This simple visual model to think about, “Here’s what growth looks like. It applies in my career. It applies with my children. It applies every time I start a new project.” And when you understand the emotional arc of what’s happening, it allows you to grow faster. And if you want to move up that S curve faster, you use those seven accelerants of growth. You disrupt yourself. Those micro disruptions are basically the tools in the backpack that help you climb the mountain of your S curve.

Tricia Sciortino:

I love that. Especially the part when you get to the top of the curve that maybe there’s a new summit you need to seek. And so I wonder how that plays into goal setting or over goal setting? So I’ve known so many people who are focused on personal growth and they’re trying to accomplish and grow in 47 areas at the same time. And so what happens, is they actually get just slightly better in 47 things and never really master. Do you have any coaching or advice for the person who is like, “There’s just too many accelerants or personal growth areas.” They’re trying to do it one time, so maybe never actually feel like they can get anywhere.

Whitney Johnson:

Yes. So George Leonard who wrote the book Mastery calls that person a dabbler.

Tricia Sciortino:

A dabbler.

Whitney Johnson:

Or a dabbler, the perpetual dabbler. So my advice on that, is that if you want to really make progress. Yes, it’s okay to explore a lot of S curves at the launch point. But eventually, you need to choose one or two and focus on those. And we now know that if we don’t focus, we won’t get anything done. Our brains actually cannot multitask. We can do one or two things at a time. And so my advice to people and my advice to myself, is to focus. And by the way, when we’re not focusing, that produces anxiety. So if you want to reduce your anxiety, stop focusing on 47 goals. Focus on two or three, do them really well, get those done. You’ll not only be more productive, your anxiety will go down and that cognitive and emotional overload that we’re all feeling, that will get reduced as well.

Tricia Sciortino:

Absolutely. And you’ll feel the benefit of your focus.

Whitney Johnson:

Right. Because you’ll get something done.

Tricia Sciortino:

Right. And then you get to the top of the curve and then you can go to the next thing.

Whitney Johnson:

That’s right.

Tricia Sciortino:

I love it. I love it. Okay. So for somebody listening right now, what is maybe a great first step they could take away from this podcast listening to you, to start investing in themselves right now? If they say, “I know I’ve got things to work on,” what is a practical one next step somebody can take today?

Whitney Johnson:

Yeah. So I think the first thing that I would encourage people to do, is to get out a piece of paper and draw the S curve and see, “Where am I on this curve? Am I at the launch point?” Because if you are at the launch point, then a practical thing to say is, “Oh, that’s why I’m feeling a little bit discouraged or impatient.” And so that’s a really practical, emotional thing you can do. And if you’re in mastery, if you’re having this experience of like, “I’m really good at all these things I’ve been doing, but I feel like I cannot do them anymore.” Now, you’ve got words to describe the experience that you’re having and you can start to do something about it. And if you’re in the sweet spot, say, “Oh, this is why I’m enjoying what I’m doing so much.” So that would be my one practical tip, is to draw the S curve, see where you are, see what emotional experience you’re having. Because once you do that, it will give you information about what you want to do next.

Tricia Sciortino:

I love that. This has been an awesome conversation. I love every word that has come out of your mouth today, Whitney. So thank you. How can our listeners connect with you from here? What’s the best way for them get in contact with you?

Whitney Johnson:

Yeah. So there are two things you can do. So since you’re listening to a podcast, you may also want to listen to other podcasts. And all of those accelerants that I talked about, I have a podcast for each one of them. But the best starting place is podcast episode number 80 of Disrupt Yourself, where I talk about framework overall. So if you want to do a deeper dive on that. And then if you want to contact me directly, you can email me at wj@whitneyjohnson.com, I answer all my emails.

Tricia Sciortino:

Wow, you just gave out your email. That’s impressive. I love it. Thank you, thank you, thank you. This conversation has been so good. Thank you, Whitney. And guys, listeners, whitney is actually going to hang around a little bit longer after this interview to answer one more question about how to leverage the seven accelerants to build your own personal growth plan. You don’t want to miss it. So to hear that clip, subscribe to our email list and we will send you a link to our bonus content or visit onenextsteppodcast.com. We can find a link in our show notes. Thank you, Whitney.

Whitney Johnson:

Thank you.

Tricia Sciortino:

Man, I really enjoyed that conversation with Whitney. She is genius. I loved it guys. And as always, we have a One Next Step for you to take. This week, Whitney is generously giving away five copies of her Disrupt Yourself book to our listeners. To enter to win a copy, you can subscribe to the One Next Step email or to text list. We will randomly select five subscribers to win a book over the next seven days. To join the One Next Step list, text the phrase “one next step” to 31996, or visit onenextsteppodcast.com.

Tricia Sciortino:

And it gets even better. If you want to guarantee you get a copy, Whitney is also offering a copy of Disrupt Yourself to the first 10 people that pre-order her new book, Smart Growth. Just order the book and send a copy of your receipt to smartgrowth@whitneyjohnson.com. So enter to win Disrupt Yourself by joining the One Next Step email list or guarantee a copy by pre-ordering Smart Growth anywhere books are sold. Guys, this has been a great one. Until next time, own your journey. And join us next week for more practical tips and actionable tools to advance your business one step at a time.

Tricia Sciortino:

The holiday season is here y’all! And what better time to talk about the importance of expressing gratitude for your team. Next week we will revisit one of our favorite episodes, where we share ways to effectively show appreciation for your team and how to reward your team for a job well done while working remotely. Here is a sneak peak.

Tricia Sciortino:

Engaged and appreciated employees perform better. If you want a high-performing team, which will produce better results and better profits, than investing in your teams satisfaction will be critical and a priority.

Speaker 2:

Thanks for listening to One Next Step. Be sure to subscribe on Apple podcasts or follow us on Spotify. Then, join us time for more practical business tips and tools to help you get more done, grow your business, and lead your team with confidence. For more episodes, show notes, and helpful resources, visit onenextsteppodcast.com.

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