Skip to main content
Reading Time: 23 minutes
Your One Next Step

Access this week’s activation guide

What to Do If You Hate Working from Home

With over 10 years of experience being a thriving 100-percent remote company, we’ve rounded up all of our resources to help you make the leap, be prepared, and get to work with confidence – remotely. Access The BELAY Guide To Leading & Working Remotely today!

Access Now

Apple Podcasts

Spotify

Google Podcasts

Stitcher

About This Episode

After years of mastering productivity and leadership in a shared office environment, many successful leaders have been forced to work and lead from home over the last year. While some love working remotely, others miss the office and hate working from home. 

 

In this masterclass episode, Tricia and LZ acknowledge that working from home isn’t for everyone. They’ll diagnose why someone may not like it and help customize a personal work environment that enables that person to thrive even if their organization is remote.

1. Integrate as many social interactions into your week as possible.

Working from home doesn’t have to be a solo experience. Schedule a lunch or two per week with friends or your spouse. Take the dog for a walk and say hello to neighbors. And, occasionally, be sure to work outside the home, setting up shop at a coffee shop, community space, library, or somewhere you can get work done while being outside your four walls. 

2. Treat remote work like any other office-based job.

Get up. Get showered and dressed. Do your hair and/or makeup. You need to feel like this is a professional job and look the part. Sure, it’s okay to let your hair down and stay in pajamas every now and then – after all, that’s a great benefit! But don’t let it become a norm. Studies have shown that it really makes a difference psychologically when you go through the actions of going to work and don’t stay in pajamas with bad breath all the time!

 

3. If you work with a great company who does everything right when it comes to remote work – and you still hate it after giving it a try – then find another company!

Life is too short to be miserable. Don’t stay in a situation you hate. There are still good companies out there that don’t do remote work or limit it. Find one of those companies, get back in an office setting, and get back to loving your job.

 

Have you had experiences working from home? How did it go?
What are the pros and cons of remote work for you? What are the pros and cons of an office setting?
Zoom meetings can take some adjustment. What are some things that have worked for you when it comes to meetings via video?
If you could go fully remote, would you? Why or why not? 
If you’re already fully remote, would you ever go back to the office? Why or why not?

It’s important to look the part for the role you intend to play.

Lisa Zeeveld

Your mindset is up to you, and so are your life choices. Change it.

Tricia Sciortino

Your environment and your mindset determine your success.

Tricia Sciortino

Determine what motivates your productivity, and find ways to integrate those things into your workday.

Tricia Sciortino

Flexibility is a gift.

Lisa Zeeveld

(02:00) Tricia reminisces about how she hated the idea of working from home when her old boss first closed their office. 

(03:00) If you hate working from home, what’s the initial thing that comes to mind when you think about why you would rather work in an office? (Tricia’s was missing the social aspect)

(04:38) Lisa was working from home when there was still dial-up internet! Video calls weren’t even a thing yet. 

(05:51) Work outside of the house from time to time. Find a change of scenery. 

(06:31) One of the biggest benefits of working remotely is you have the opportunity to do work while you are traveling. 

(07:25) Remote work also allows flexibility to create a schedule for yourself without the hard 9 to 5 parameters of working in an office.

(10:07) Get up, get showered and dressed, and treat remote work like you were going into an office. It makes a difference psychologically. 

(11:49) Carve out a space to work away from the television and the kids. 

(14:28) If you keep telling yourself how much you hate something, you’re going to keep hating it. You control your mindset. 

(14:51) Think about the positives of working from home. Tricia lists some examples.

(18:06) Video makes all the difference. 

(19:11) Don’t assume that just because you’re in a bad work-from-home situation that it will always be this way. Many companies do remote work right. 

(20:22) If you’re in a situation where the company is doing everything right with remote work, and you still don’t like it, then simply go back to an office environment!

(21:16) This week’s one next step: Download The BELAY Guide to Working From Home. We’ve always been a 100% remote company, so our team compiled our top tips to make working from home the most productive way to work. 

Tricia Sciortino:

I remember my boss coming to me and saying, “Hey, we’re closing the office and we’re going to start working remotely.” And literally my first response was, “Is today the first day you met me? I can’t work home alone, I’m an extrovert. And I love coming in here and having lunch with my coworkers.”

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

And I thought I was never going to make it. But the truth is, I would never go back the other direction.

Speaker 3:

Welcome to One Next Step, the most practical business podcast in the world, helping you get more done, grow your business, and lead your team with confidence, with tips and tools you didn’t get in business school. Here are your hosts, Tricia Sciortino and Lisa Zeeveld.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Welcome to One Next Step, I’m Lisa COO of BELAY.

Tricia Sciortino:

And I’m Tricia, CEO of BELAY. So LZ and I have learned a lot throughout our careers, and this podcast is our way of sharing what we’ve learned with you. Those experiences helped us grow a 100% remote business from startup to being recognized on the Inc. 5000 Fastest Growing Companies list. For the One Next Step podcast, we want to bring you episodes filled with excellent content. We are here to help you on your leadership journey, and ultimately help you enjoy your work and your life.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes, T, and today we have a topic just about everyone can relate to, working from home. We couldn’t have said that a year ago, but now we can. Many organizations have not brought back their teams into the office, and some may choose to keep staff remote on a permanent basis. There are several benefits to both situations, but as parents try to juggle work with children still at home, or single extroverts work alone in their apartment, not everyone has enjoyed the experience of working from home. Work life and home life is starting to blend together. It’s challenging. So what do you do if you really don’t like working from home, Tricia?

Tricia Sciortino:

I know.

Lisa Zeeveld:

To the point that you flat out hate it. Maybe you’ll have a few tips for us to reframe our thinking to begin enjoying working from home.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes. It’s funny because I have been working from home for many years, and when I first went from in office to home, I remember my boss coming to me and saying, “Hey, we’re going to bring the team remote, we’re closing the office and we’re going to start working remotely.” And literally my first response was, “Is today the first day you met me?” I can’t work home alone, I’m an extrovert, and I love people and being engaged, and I love coming in here and having lunch with my coworkers.”

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

And I thought I was never going to make it. But the truth is, many years later, it’s been about 15 years. I’ve been working from home, I would never go back the other direction. I have learned to find the benefits, and how to love working remote. So first thing I would say about if you hate working from home, or if you think you hate working from home, is to really think about what is it about working from home that you’re missing the office? What is the initial thing?

Lisa Zeeveld:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Tricia Sciortino:

For me out the gate it was the social aspect.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Sure.

Tricia Sciortino:

So I was really going to miss being around a team of people. So my first tip is, and one of the things that I’ve really tried to practice, is integrating socialization into your home workday.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Okay.

Tricia Sciortino:

So instead of sitting in my office all day long for eight hours, I make sure to really schedule breaks and give myself opportunities to add socialization into my day. So what that might look like is scheduling lunch with a friend every Friday at noon.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes.

Tricia Sciortino:

Give me an opportunity to get out of my house, see a girlfriend, or a coworker even if they live in the same area, give you a reason to actually leave your house, leave your desk, and socialize, and give yourself as many as those opportunities as you can find. I also, from a socialization perspective, get walks in the middle of my day. I just got back from taking my little Yorkie Lola for an afternoon lunch walk.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Love that, love that.

Tricia Sciortino:

And I see the neighbors in the neighborhood, we’re waving, hi everybody, getting out of the house and feeling like I’m participating in the world and I’m not stuck in my little home office. So I guess that’s my first tip is determining what’s the part you’re missing, and if it is that socialization piece, there are things you can do to integrate it into your day.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah, absolutely. I love that, and I try to do the same too. Like you, I started working remote back before working remote was cool, we still had dial-up back then. I was given the opportunity right after I had my son to work remotely, and it was hard back then. I mean, I think of how far we’ve come in 20 years, and there’s so many more resources that you can lean into. We didn’t even use video back then. And so I think that really structuring your day, building in time to have that social interaction, is super important, even if it means that right now, because of the way that the world is set up with the pandemic, it’s just a Zoom, or it’s just a walk around the neighborhood by yourself, or maybe don’t have your groceries delivered, maybe go pick them up once in awhile if you can.

Tricia Sciortino:

Force yourself to go get the groceries.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah, because you need to be able to see people, and have that interaction, especially if you are living alone. And I think so often it’s easy for us just to assume that everybody’s living with somebody, but there’s definitely people out there who live alone, and also work alone, and that can be very hard for them too. So the more that you can plan your social interaction, I think the better it is for you.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, and I think to even take it to the next step, if you have the opportunity to work outside of the house from time to time, to take advantage of that.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Mm-hmm (affirmative), right.

Tricia Sciortino:

So another tip would be, whether it’s working from a Starbucks or a Panera, or if there’s a shared work space near your home.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes.

Tricia Sciortino:

If there’s somewhere, like the Community Clubhouse in my neighborhood offers wifi, and you can go work from there, so there’ll be some people working. So just even a change of scenery, sometimes you might just decide one day a week for half your day, you’re going to pick up and you’re going to work elsewhere to get the change of scenery from your four walls in your home office.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah, and I think that is one of the biggest benefits is that you have the opportunity to travel while you’re working. Certain people just think, well I have to be at home and I’m going to be in front of my desk, and the idea of having the luxury of working remotely is that you can do it everywhere, anywhere.

Tricia Sciortino:

That’s on the pro list, yeah, the check, yes.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right, yeah. So if you’ve got a family member who you can go and work from their place, go do that. I know I go visit my mom every summer, I stay there for an extra week, I work, kids get to swim. I’m spending time with her, but at the same time I’m working.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And so finding ways to build in social interaction is so huge, and take advantage of the flexibility.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, it is such a gift. I’ve gotten so used to the flexibility I couldn’t go back, like I was saying earlier.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I know.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes. And another part, I would say, about working remote is that I think a lot of people, they’re used to, I need to be in my office at eight.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Tricia Sciortino:

And I start work, and then I leave at five and I end work.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

Tricia Sciortino:

And it’s very cut and dry when you’re going into, you have your shift, you have your time of day you’re working. I think what happens when people go home, they lose that. Work can start and end whenever you decide, within reason based on your organization’s rules and guidelines, but I say we’re very flexible and we can start and finish when works for us within a given timeframe of normal business hours.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right, business hours, yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, but being sure to really stick to and create a schedule for yourself. Like, okay, I literally set an alarm, get up at whatever time, you’re going to set your alarm as if you are going into an office, you’re going to set your alarm for seven, you’re going to have your breakfast, you’re going to shower and dress, and you’re starting your workday at eight, or whatever that time is. Keep yourself in the routine of going into the office when you’re home, and then also ending your day.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

Tricia Sciortino:

And so what studies have shown, with more and more people working from home, is that more people are working longer and later, and work drags into your day, Next thing you look up from your desk and you said, oh man, it’s 6:30 PM already?

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

Tricia Sciortino:

So really being mindful of your start and stop time, and treat it as if you are going an office, and I think that will help put some real good boundaries and clarity and peace of mind for you if you’re working remote.

Tricia Sciortino:

I want to talk about leading remotely, because whether you’re just dipping your toe into remote leadership, or you’ve jumped in with both feet, one thing is certain, while it’s not rocket science, it does take some careful leadership adjustments and recalibrations to foster the kind of relationships you need to be successful. Thankfully, BELAY has 10 years of experience being a 100% remote company, and has the expertise necessary to help guide you.

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s right, and it gets even better. For our podcast listeners, BELAY is offering free four part mini remote leadership masterclass that covers a variety of topics including productivity, trust, communication, and culture. You can lead a thriving, engaged, and productive team remotely, and BELAY can help you. Get started by visiting BELAYsolutions.com/minicourse today.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And I just want to elaborate on the part that you said, get up, get showered, and get dressed. I hear a lot of people, and this starts to mess with you psychologically, who just roll out of bed, stay in their pajamas, grab a desk, or put their laptop, stay in bed, work very, very casually. Now here at BELAY that’s hard to do because we use video conferencing so often, but there’s still a lot of organizations that aren’t using video conferencing, and so there’s no real need to get dressed and look professional, but it makes all the difference in the world. Actually put on a collared shirt, put on jeans, or put on a pair of chinos and feel like you’re going somewhere. I put on perfume every day, earrings everyday,

Tricia Sciortino:

I was going to say, you’re rocking earrings, I see you, wearing earrings and jewelry and your makeup’s done.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes, that’s right, and I curl my hair.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And you do, you always do too.

Tricia Sciortino:

Sometimes. Most of the time, I’m teasing. Yeah. It’s important.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Most of the time, yeah, and it’s because you need to feel like you have a professional job. And I think that that goes into how you deliver, your communication, is that you’re being professional. And not only is there studies shown about weight gain and depression, and all of that, but you have to put your work pants on, your business pants.

Tricia Sciortino:

Literally.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And it’s okay to take maybe one day a week and just leave your sweats on, or your yoga pants or whatever/ but please, you will find it makes a world of difference if you just look the part for the role that you’re going to jump into for that day. And then the next thing I want to talk about is having space to work.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes.

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s important.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Carve out a space to work. There’s a lot of littles home right now. We love our littles, Littles are phenomenal, I worked at home with littles too, but littles want their space as much as you want your space.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, and make it a space you don’t mind working in. So for me.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

I’m constantly redecorating my office.

Lisa Zeeveld:

You are.

Tricia Sciortino:

I do an annual-

Lisa Zeeveld:

New picture.

Tricia Sciortino:

It’s become ridiculous. But you’re in your little spot, whether you have your own dedicated office or it’s a part of a room, or whatever it may be, make it a place you don’t mind sitting and enjoying and working from.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

Tricia Sciortino:

So aesthetically pleasing, organized, doesn’t stress you out because it’s a mess or cluttered. So keeping a clean and inviting and pleasing workspace also goes into that whole mindset part of things. Not only do you want to show up to work in the morning and be dressed as if you’re going to work, but go to a place where you don’t mind working. So environment.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And you don’t have to have a big home. I mean, if you are in a one bedroom studio apartment, get on Pinterest. There are so many great ideas .over the years, actually my husband has also worked remotely for the last 20 years, his favorite office of all time, he will laugh when he listens to this and I’m giving away his secrets, his favorite office of all time, T, was the closet beneath the stairs in the old house.

Tricia Sciortino:

Okay.

Lisa Zeeveld:

You remember that house?

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Tricia and I lived in a very similar model at one time.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And we were able to fit a card table in that closet, And so he could have the computer set up.

Tricia Sciortino:

Oh my gosh.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And then when he didn’t need it, he never closed the door on him, but he could open the door, sit at the desk, and when he was done he could close the door and, the kids were little at that time, they wouldn’t touch the computer, and all those kinds of things. But get creative, it doesn’t mean you have to have a separate room, it can be just a corner that you put up a card table. I know right now there are a lot of cool tech tables, I think is what they’re being called.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Where they’re almost a C, and you can move it underneath the chair that you’re working in, and you can put your space there. So get creative, but having something that is yours really does make the difference.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, there’s So many unique ways to make an office feel like your little spot that you enjoy working from, so many fun ways to make it happen.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Totally.

Tricia Sciortino:

So yeah, your environment and your mindset are so important. And here’s the best part of all these tips and things we’re talking about, is you actually control your mind. Okay people?

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

Tricia Sciortino:

Your mindset is yours to control.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

So if you keep telling yourself how much you hate something, guess what? You’re going to keep on hating it.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

Tricia Sciortino:

You have to change your words and change your language.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Tricia Sciortino:

The next thing I would say is about, what are the positives? Remind yourself, what are actually the benefits, and start focusing on those.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

Tricia Sciortino:

So start thinking about the fact that you no longer are commuting and sitting in traffic every day, morning and night.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes. You’re saving money.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Saving money on gas, saving money on clothes. I mean, come on.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, yes, and if you have kids and you’re a parent, man, the flexibility is awesome, and that’s been one of the most important things to me and why I love working remote is that I’m in the home when the kids need me.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

Tricia Sciortino:

So I like being accessible to them, I like being able on my lunch break to go see my kids and have lunch with them, or chat with them and be present for them, I’m glad I’m not in an office all day long, so to me that’s a positive also.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. Yeah, same with me. There was a season of time where I did not work, and I really joined BELAY because of the flexibility. At that time, and one of our co-founders, Shannon Miles, writes about it, the third option, is I didn’t want to choose between being a present parent and having a phenomenal career, I wanted to be able to do both. And so throughout my time working remotely, whether it’s been for BELAY or other companies, my kids know that they’re still first.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yep.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And they will always be first. And I’m also fortunate that my husband works from home. And so right now my kids are in school, I’ve got one in college who’s not here and one who is in high school, and fortunately we’re in a county that sends them to school. But we have breakfast together, we have lunch together.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah.

Lisa Zeeveld:

We get to play with the dogs on a quick break, I get to see when Amazon delivers my packages.

Tricia Sciortino:

Oh, you get to welcome the UPS driver in person if you so choose.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I do, and I don’t have to wait all day to open the box, I can open it right when it happens, as I did today on my lunch break.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, yes.

Lisa Zeeveld:

But no, I think having a really good connection to your family is, to me, the number one benefit.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yep.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I’m here for everything, and I wouldn’t trade that for anything in the world. And I think that that in turn has made me a better employee. I work harder because I know the benefit, and I never wanted to give that benefit up. I didn’t want to have to go into an office, and so I work harder, and I think that I see that in our own employees.

Tricia Sciortino:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Lisa Zeeveld:

They’re grateful for the opportunity, and so they deliver more.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, absolutely. And I think, whatever that thing is for you, it’s recognizing what that is.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Tricia Sciortino:

So if you do live alone, and you’re not in the home with the family, what are the things that you do love and engage with?

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

Tricia Sciortino:

Do you have best friends you want to see for lunch? Do you enjoy taking your dog for walks like me?

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

So really finding the positive spin on what to you might be a negative situation, I think for all of us is just good counsel to get through something that we might not enjoy. And I think you guys, similarly to me, those of you who hate it, I really thought I was not going to like working from home, and I absolutely love it. And my last tip on missing the engagement really is, and you talked a little bit about it a minute ago, is video makes all the difference.

Tricia Sciortino:

When I first started working remote, everything was a conference call or a phone call, you didn’t really see people. I think today’s day and age, Zoom and Microsoft Teams and all of the options that are out there, if you’re a leader or part of a team and you’re missing seeing people, my advice to you is get on a webcam. We recommend it to everybody. We’re actually mandated at our organization that all of our meetings are on webcam, because we recognize the importance that people need people, people want to see people, body language matters, gives you a reason to do your hair and put on some lipstick. So maybe your leader doesn’t require that you be on video, but maybe you should talk to him about it and ask him if it’s something to consider. And if you are a leader, maybe your team wants to be on Zoom, because they want to see each other’s faces and connect with other people and employees.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah, and I would say, don’t throw the baby out with the bath water, because right now if you are an employee at an organization that is not implementing these things, and you feel alone, and maybe culture is not an important part of their organization, don’t just assume that you can’t ever work remotely. Don’t make that assumption, because I have found more people after a little while, even going so far as my stepdad, when this first happened I remember him saying, “Oh, I just don’t like this,” now he loves it, he’s learned to accept it. He has other long, wonderful career in person, and he couldn’t believe it. So do some inventory about where you’re working if you’re an employee, and perhaps it’s where you’re working, not actually working remotely is the problem, because if they’re not investing in getting to know you and they’re not investing in other opportunities to build the culture, that could be key.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Like you said, if you are the boss, if you’re a business leader right now, if you’re an entrepreneur and you’re listening to this, just know that your team members want to see each other, and they want to be connected, even if they have a whole family at home to entertain them, they want to feel connected to you. And last but not least I would say, if you do work for a company that has a phenomenal culture, and they’re seeing you, and they’re showing you you’re of valued, and all of those things, and you still don’t like working remotely, go back to an office. Find a job.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yep, in an office.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Because life is too short to be miserable.

Tricia Sciortino:

Absolutely.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And so we love it, doesn’t mean you’re going to love it, but don’t sit there and be grumpy pants, just find a new place to work.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes.

Lisa Zeeveld:

At the end of the day.

Tricia Sciortino:

And that’s good just life counsel in general. So if there’s something about your life, today we’re talking about hating working remote, that you don’t like, here’s what else, I told you mindset is up to you, so are your life choices. Change it.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

Tricia Sciortino:

It’s up to you.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

It’s up to you to change it.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Exactly.

Tricia Sciortino:

It’s your journey, you own it.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes.

Tricia Sciortino:

Go change it.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Totally. Well, I can’t end up better than that, so let’s jump into the one next step. We have a download for you so you can take your one next step. This week’s download is the BELAY guide to working from home. We’ve always been a 100% remote company, so our team compiled our top tips to make working from home the most productive way to work.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, this is going to be a good one, guys. So text the phrase One Next Step to 31996, or visit onenextsteppodcast.com, and you’ll get access to today’s resources to help you keep moving forward.

Tricia Sciortino:

Thank you guys for joining us today, we hope today’s episode has encouraged you to make a few adjustments that will help you enjoy working from home, not hate it. May we look back on these remote times as a challenge we not only overcame, but an opportunity we appreciate. Until next time, own your journey, it’s your life and your business, it’s up to you to create the life and organization you want. Join us next week for more practical tips and actionable tools to advance your business one step at a time.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Start by making today count.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Don’t miss next week’s episode when we will be discussing how to maximize your virtual assistant and become a dynamic duo, with Katie Lantukh the CEO of Murphy Marketing and her BELAY assistant, Ari Adler. Here’s a sneak peak.

Katie Lantukh:

I know the BELAY has a good reputation. I trust that they vetted these people, I just trusted the process and Ari proved me right, that he’s worthy of my complete trust and he has made my business so much better and I feel like my clients are taken better care of now that we have more than just one person on the line, it’s been extremely helpful.

Speaker 3:

Thanks for listening to one next step. Be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or follow us on Spotify, then join us next time for more practical business tips and tools to help you get more done, grow your business, and lead your team with competence. For more episodes, show notes and helpful resources visit onenextsteppodcast.com.

Subscribe to One Next Step & Start Doing Small Business Big

Apple Podcasts

Spotify

Google Podcasts

Stitcher