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Being a Pro At Saying “No”

We’ve developed several email responses to common requests we receive. From speaking engagements to interviews – these canned email responses will help you put your best “no” forward with confidence. Simply copy and paste them into an email or edit them to make it your own.

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About This Episode

One of the most simple — yet hardest  — ways to enjoy work and get more fulfillment in life is learning how to say “no.” But the demands on your time, combined with the sense of responsibility you feel for your customers, team members, and family, might often compel you to say “yes” to every request and stretch yourself thin as you attempt to support everyone well. 

 

In this episode, we’ll talk about how leaders can say “no” – and, in some cases, “not now” –  to opportunities, projects, meetings, and even your internal desire to stay involved. That way, you’ll have more margin for your most important priorities and responsibilities only you can do.

1. “No” is a complete sentence.

Simply saying no is enough. You don’t have to explain yourself or go into great detail about all the reasons this isn’t going to work. You can still be grateful and thank the person for the invite or opportunity while simply saying you can’t do what they’re asking right now. Saying “yes” to everything – or even trying to explain your “no” all the time – can be exhausting. Good leaders have learned that by simply saying “no” to the wrong things, they can say “yes” to the right things.  

2. Your “no” is someone else’s “yes.”

Think about it. As a leader, you’ve done lots of hands-on tasks over the years. If you’re still doing what you’ve always been doing, you’re not allowing someone else to step up and grow in their role. Delegate! If you can’t make dinner tonight, ask your son if he’s up for it. If you simply can’t make that meeting or start on a project, you know the people who are capable of doing the job just fine. Get them involved and give the gift of opportunity to others. 

3. Review your priorities every month.

Take some time each month to look back at the past month and determine if you said “yes” to the right things. Did your family get the best of you, or were you worn ragged by the time you got home from taking on too much? Did your team get the best of your leadership, or were you so tied up in meetings that they hardly knew you were around? Adjust your priorities each month and make sure you are taking on the right things.

What is one thing you’ve said “yes” to recently that you should have passed on? 
Do you feel the need to explain when you say “no?” Why or why not?
What are some of the best ways that Tricia and Lisa mentioned for you to learn how to say “no” more often?
Where you spend your time reveals what you think is most important. What adjustments can you make in that area?

No. Is a complete sentence.

Lisa Zeeveld

Anybody can be a yes-man, great leaders know when to say no.

Tricia Sciortino

Saying no gets easier with practice.

Tricia Sciortino

We often say yes because we are looking for validation instead of realizing the value we already bring.

Lisa Zeeveld

Your no is somebody else’s yes.

Tricia Sciortino

BELAY’s Virtual Bookkeeping Service

Tricia Sciortino on Instagram and LinkedIn.

Lisa Zeeveld on Instagram and LinkedIn.

(02:03) Tricia talks about turning 50 this year and how she’s become more cognizant of her time over the years. 

(03:46) Lisa talks about growing and maturing out of always being a “people pleaser.”

(05:58) What are some of the reasons why people have a hard time saying no.

(06:47) FOMO.

(07:40) How do you know when it’s okay to say no?

(10:43) The value of an accountability partner. 

(12:58) You can have a successful career without sacrificing time with your family.

(15:10) Saying no actually allows someone else to say yes and do something they might not have been able to do in the past. 

(16:27) Where you spend your time shows what’s important to you. 

(17:31) Review your priorities once a month – are you saying yes to the right things?

(18:13) Tips from Tricia and LZ  on how to say no more often.

(19:51) Tricia shares a recent story of having to say “no” to something she initially wanted to say “yes” to. 

(21:53) Should you ever have to explain your no?

(23:30) This week’s one next step: Go download our canned email responses. We developed several email responses to common requests we receive –  like speaking engagements or interviews – to help us say “no.” You can copy and paste them into an email or edit them to make it your own.

Lisa Zeeveld:

No. Is a complete sentence.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes.

Lisa Zeeveld:

It doesn’t have to be no, it can just be no.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, we don’t need to be yes-men, I say it all the time, right? I say this to our team. Our leadership team here. You all aren’t here because I want you to be a bunch of yes-men.

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s right.

Tricia Sciortino:

Right. So anybody can be a yes-man. Great leaders know when to say no.

Speaker 1:

Welcome to One Next Step, the most practical business podcast in the world, helping you get more done, grow your business and lead your team with confidence, with tips and tools you didn’t get in business school. Here are your hosts, Tricia Sciortino and Lisa Zeeveld.

Tricia Sciortino:

Welcome to one next step. I’m Tricia, the CEO of BELAY.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Hey, I’m Lisa COO of BELAY, Tricia, and I have learned a lot along the way. So for the One Next Step, we want to bring you episodes filled with excellent content. One Next Step is here to help you on your leadership journey, to help you run your business so you can enjoy your life and your work. One of the most simple yet hardest ways to enjoy work and get more fulfillment in life is learning how to say, no.

Tricia Sciortino:

That is so true, boundaries.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes.

Tricia Sciortino:

Boundaries and saying no. I think the older we get… It’s funny I saw something on Instagram this week. The older we get, the more we should be saying no. Our time becomes more valuable resource, the older we become, and I actually feel that.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Older and wiser?

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, older and running out of time, no. Also wiser. So, this is the year… dare I say, I’m telling the whole world. I’m acknowledging that this is the year that I turned 50. Oh my gosh. Can you believe it?

Lisa Zeeveld:

Late, late in the year. Late in the year.

Tricia Sciortino:

Late, 50 nonetheless. I’ll be waiting for the pink flamingos on my lawn.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

So I now more than ever I’m truly cognizant of my time. I realized what a finite resource it is and I have over the years said yes and devoted time to so many things that really I probably should have said no to. So the act of learning how to say no, to be more aware of boundaries is so top of mind for me and really-

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

Tricia Sciortino:

… Setting them to place. There are so many times I said, yes. And here’s what happens. Especially whenever I was sat in maybe a new seat in the organization. When I was first promoted to vice president of operations a few years back here at BELAY, I said yes to everything because I was looking to impress. I was looking to show I earned that promotion and so I really ran myself ragged, honestly, into a wall, into burnout mode because I just took on all the things. And similarly had kind of really recognized myself going through that cycle every time I kind of got the new job or the next big thing is I found myself accelerating how much time I was investing in saying yes to everything and wound up hurting myself. So really burning myself out. So I’m sure you’ve had experiences maybe along those lines, LZ.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well, yes. I’m definitely… The first word that came was people-pleaser and I definitely don’t feel that. Although, easily 15 years ago I would have been a people pleaser. I think that’s just something that I could have easily said, but before we started recording, you just told everyone you’re turning 50, so I’m going to share to everybody with my baggage.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, bring your baggage to the podcast bae.

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s why I’m bringing it to the podcast today. Is I think that I say yes a lot of times because I’m looking for validation and there is some sort of reward that I feel off of accomplishing something and saying yes to it. So it’s almost that I value myself by how much responsibility I’m taking on. Instead of realizing that I do offer so much value and I need to be way more picky about where I want to invest that time. I think that’s just something that I’ve carried through most of my life, is just feeling like I need to show up and bring value. And so I take a whole bunch of it on so I can show a lot of people my value instead of maybe going deeper in the few things that matter most, and so it could be.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Some examples are taking on a project that I don’t need to take on. Actually, I was talking with our VP of HR here, Krisha Bueller yesterday, and she was talking to a coach and they were saying how easy it is sometimes to take on responsibilities in another area, where you actually go down in your position, and there’s a lot of times where I’m like, “Oh, sure, I’ll pick up that project,” which I know I shouldn’t have picked up the project. I should have probably elevated somebody instead of me going down to take on that project because I have so much experience or I love to mentor. Probably taking on too many mentoring relationships all at one time. So I think the act of saying yes is something to your point. I say a lot. I don’t necessarily think it’s a problem, but I definitely have to keep it in check.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, so you don’t wind up against the wall.

Lisa Zeeveld:

No.

Tricia Sciortino:

As long as you have balance, right?

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

So I think a lot of people have a hard time saying no. If we think about the reasons people have a hard time saying no, using ourselves by experience, I think that it is that people don’t want to disappoint others.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

Tricia Sciortino:

They don’t want to turn somebody down. When somebody asking for you to participate in something, ask your help in some way, you want to say yes, whether it’s a peer, a coworker, somebody in other organization, a network partner.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

Tricia Sciortino:

Whatever those opportunities. A friend, a neighbor. You want to say yes because you don’t want to disappoint others and you want to be helpful and you want to be a good friend and a good coworker and a good boss and all the things. So I see that’s how people get themselves in a pickle. And then there’s good old fashioned FOMO that a lot of people have. I’m the antithesis of FOMO.

Lisa Zeeveld:

You are. I have learned from you.

Tricia Sciortino:

I have no FOMO.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I have learned from you.

Tricia Sciortino:

I did not have the Fear Of Missing Out. I have JOMO, I have Joy Of Missing Out.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes.

Tricia Sciortino:

But there are a lot of people who say yes to things because they don’t want to miss out on what’s going to happen.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

Tricia Sciortino:

What kind of fun is going to go on there?

Lisa Zeeveld:

Totally.

Tricia Sciortino:

I want to be part of that. They don’t want to be excluded. That is at least one area that I find myself getting dragged into.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

And then there’s like what you said with work. There’s also a feeling of absolute obligation.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

Tricia Sciortino:

It is my job to step down into these weeds or take on this project because nobody else is available or whatever that is. So we take on things that we shouldn’t because we feel like we must.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And I think it’s one of those times, it’s like, how do you know when it’s okay to say no?

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right. Like especially when it comes around obligation or the disappointment. I think FOMO is probably a little bit easier to say, no, you just got to convince yourself, it’ll be fine. But I think when it revolves around relationships with people or your livelihood, then it’s a lot harder to say no. So when do you know personally when to say no. How do you gauge?

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. So for me, I can recognize in myself when I’m feeling overwhelmed. So in other words, like I have taken on too many things, whether it’s personally, professionally, whatever the circumstance may be. Sometimes it’s a variety of reasons. But like for work, for example, where I’ve sat in too many meetings or I agreed to participate in too many things or projects or as CEO represent BELAY in a podcast or an event and I’ve over committed myself, I really do feel that physically.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Okay.

Tricia Sciortino:

So I noticed myself, I get migraines, I get bad headaches. I don’t sleep well. So it physically manifests in me when I’m overwhelmed or overworked or over-scheduled.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes.

Tricia Sciortino:

And so for years I just kind of pushed through and I was telling myself, suck it up, buttercup, just keep on going.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right, yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

But the older I get, the more I realized, I don’t want to feel like crap. I don’t want to lose sleep. I don’t want to have a headache because I’ve done too much today.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

Tricia Sciortino:

So it really forced myself to put in boundaries for myself. And so that is the first thing I’ve done to help me say no is that I only have a finite number of hours in my day and in my week and in my month, and there are things that I must fit in there. My family, my kids, being a mom, dinner time. First and foremost, laying the foundation of being a present parent, then filtering on all my obligations at work that are truly the obligations, all of my team one-on-ones, BELAY leadership, vision, casting, all the things I must do. And then, honestly, everything else is a considered no for me at that point.

Lisa Zeeveld:

It sounds like an ideal week almost.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, and so that’s how I frame it up is I do.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

I kind of say if all things are perfect in the world, this is what my week would look like and my assistant has that. So I practice following what is an ideal scenario as much as possible, and I get better at it the more I practice it. So it’s kind of like a snowball. When you start saying no and actually realize if you say no kindly people actually don’t get mad at you.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

Like people are actually really understand you.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Sure, yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

Then you learn to do it more and then again, and then it’s almost becomes very freeing.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. Well, and then do you… I’ve known some other friends of mine who almost have like accountability partners. Do you find that you’ve got friends or peers that you work with that can even notice that too? Like sometimes we have a hard time seeing it in ourselves, like for you, I know physically. For me it may not be physical, but my communication becomes maybe a little bit shorter, maybe you become a little bit more irritable like do you find that having somebody who can keep you accountable and be like, “Okay, T how are you doing today?” Does that help? Do you lean into Melissa, your EA to help with some of that?

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, so Melissa really is the secret weapon for boundaries in my life, to be honest.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Okay, yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

And this is, I’m not trying to be an advertisement for everybody should have a VA, however, I’m going to go out there and say it. I think you should have a VA.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

Life-changing. She really is my gatekeeper on all the things that I say yes to and I really challenged her to take it… Really take it next level. There are times when I plan to say yes to something and she stops me.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Wow.

Tricia Sciortino:

She’s like, “I think so-and-so can do this instead of you.”

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

And I was like, “Okay.” And she’s doing it because she knows that if I over commit, I’m going to be in a bad place. I’m not going to feel good. I might be like you said, I might get cranky. I might be burnt out. I might miss out on an opportunity to be present with my family. So she knows my goal is to avoid burnout and truly implement my ideal week as much as possible. So she’s having her as an accountability partner is truly amazing, honestly. And then the family doesn’t need to get rest of me at the end of the day, and that’s the part that has always bothered me is that put in a good old fashioned work day, and then all you want to do is crash on the couch after the end of the day and not really have much energy left, you’re depleted to give to your family. So for me saying no means I’m conserving some of my energy for the second half of my day which is the family part of my day.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah, well, and I think that you and I are in a unique position that I’ve got… My son’s in college, daughter in high school, you’ve got two daughters in high school and so it’s really easy for us. Perhaps some listeners out there that got littles and they can’t imagine that at some point there’ll be done through this stage, but it goes by really fast and so you do not want to spend the bulk of the time that you have while your kids are little and in an office, or just with your face in front of your phone or computer at home too. Don’t miss out on those opportunities, and so I think that’s really key to reiterate is that you don’t want your family to get the leftover.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, and I think we’re… The society tells us that if you’re going to have a successful career, that’s actually the case.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right, yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

Is that if you’re successful, it must mean you worked 80 hours, you barely see your family and right you’re grumpy.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

And we’re here to say a bull crap on that.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

We are to say no, sir. Not the case. Let’s be the model of you can have a successful career, lead a great team and do great work and do it in 40 hours. Legit.

Tricia Sciortino:

If you’re anything like me, then keeping up with the daily tasks of AR, AP, and account reconciliation are not your favorite things, but you also know how necessary and important it is. The good news is it doesn’t have to be your thing anymore BELAY can help.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Numbers are totally my thing, Tricia, and thankfully numbers are BELAY bookkeeper’s thing too. Our sponsor BELAY believes you deserve top notch bookkeepers to produce balance sheets, pay bills, reconcile bank, and credit card statements and monthly reports to keep you up to date on the numbers of your organization, whether you’re a church, nonprofit or a business, they have the right people ready to help. Talk to their team today and never lose sleep over your financials again. Get started by visiting belaysolutions.com/services/bookkeepers today.

Lisa Zeeveld:

The other thing that I love about saying no, and I’m a giver I want to help everybody. I just love empowering people is that it gives somebody else the opportunity to do something that they might not otherwise get the opportunity to do.

Tricia Sciortino:

Right. Your no is somebody else’s yes.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right. And they’ve been dying to do that, right? They’re just hoping that you’re going to delegate something to them. And so I think that’s another thing to remember is that so often by hoarding responsibilities and hoarding task, we are actually shutting somebody else out from growing in their potential role or growing just in their skillset because again, we want to say this podcast is supposed to help you personally and professionally. And so by saying, unfortunately I can’t make dinner tonight, give somebody else in your family an opportunity to work together and maybe make dinner. By saying no to a project, you have somebody on your team who’s been looking to do that project and so I think that for those of us who have a hard time saying, no, just think about the opportunities that you could gift your family and your team by saying no.

Tricia Sciortino:

Absolutely, and where you spend your time will be the true measure of what’s important to you.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

I said about time and money, right?

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

Whatever you spend your money on is what you obviously think is important. So check your bank account.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes. Expensive shoes for me.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes.

Tricia Sciortino:

Handbags and high heels.

Tricia Sciortino:

And where you spend your time is a measure of what is important to you. So I always think about that when I’m looking at the pie of my time in a given day. It’s like, what am I spending my hours on? And I want to make sure that my family and friends, and everybody’s getting a piece of my time pie and it’s not just all work. So I really do believe in work-life balance and that really does require us to say no. As we grow, our organizations grow, our responsibilities grow, we could have a thousand yeses.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

Tricia Sciortino:

We have to prioritize and determine what are the must yeses and what has to be a no.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah, and a great way to do that too is just once a month kind of review what your priorities are. I use my values as that goal, but sit down once a month and say, am I saying yes to all the right things and no to the things that I could be delegating to somebody else and is my family feeling like they’re the most important? Am I working on my health so that I can live a long time? Am I investing in non-profits or charities that are important to me? I think that’s a great way to also measure if you’re saying yes to the right things and no to the things that you shouldn’t. So why don’t we offer some of our listeners tips? What are some tips you would have to share?

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes. So the first thing I would say is, well, I mentioned earlier no takes practice. So practice saying no, decline something with ease kindly.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes.

Tricia Sciortino:

Then do it again and then do it again. So I would say practice saying no. Well, I think what you will find out is that it’s actually, okay. You’re thought of no less, you are no less valuable and you might’ve given somebody else an opportunity. So practice, practice, practice.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. I love that. Another thing I think that is good is pause for a moment. And I’ve actually taught my family this because I learned this pretty early off and for my kids, I always say, I’m okay to be the bad guy too. Right? Like if somebody asks you to do something and you’re not quite sure because you really kind of want to do it, but maybe you don’t have time to say, “Can I please get back to you?”

Tricia Sciortino:

Imagine that, think about it.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I know. Or I’ll say, you know what? I really need to talk to my husband about that. And then I’ve taught my kids to say, Oh, I actually need to ask my mom about that. I don’t care if their friends think I’m cool or not, whatever, right?

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes.

Lisa Zeeveld:

But it gives them an opportunity to really think through the opportunities to say yes or no too. And so people will tell you if they need an answer immediately, but there are very few things in this world that need a rush answer. And so just say, you know what, “Hey, thank you so much for the opportunity. I’d like some time to think about it. Can I get back to you in X, Y, Z.”

Tricia Sciortino:

Absolutely.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Two days, three days, whatever it needs to be because I think then you can look at your schedule, look at your priorities and actually make a good decision, an informed decision on whether you should say yes or no.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, I just had something like that happened to me. Honestly, I was asked to participate in at this conference and after speaking to the conference committee that was putting it together, I was all yes. But then I knew I needed to go back and do some stuff. Well, it turns out I’m not available it’s during a week where I already have heavy travel. So my initial response would have been yes, but after going through my calendar or my priorities, I realized it was going to have to be a no for me. It was going to be really hard to make it happen. So I think that’s… It goes into exactly what you’re saying. Just take a minute.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, right.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Look at your day, look at your week, look at your month, this is going to work out for me or not.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, and I think another great tip is a no doesn’t have to be never. No can be not now. No, can be thank you for asking me to participate on XYZ podcast or with your team, whatever that may be. I’m unable to attend next month, however, I’d love to join you over the summer or whatever that may be.

Tricia Sciortino:

Right.

Tricia Sciortino:

I think your nos don’t have to be so hard. Maybe it’s an opportunity that would circle back around and that you could do it later. So even saying not at this time, check back with me, is a great response.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right. Yeah, or maybe not even to the level that they ask originally. Like if somebody says, “Hey, we’d love for you to be a part of this event.” And maybe you can’t because of your travel schedule, you could really, but you don’t want to, because it’s going to take time away from your priorities, but maybe you could join virtually.

Tricia Sciortino:

Imagine that nowadays you can almost do everything virtually.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I know, or maybe it’s that you can’t participate in that charity event, but you could give a donation. There’s always… If it’s important to you and you’re really wrestling with saying no, well, you maybe look for another way that you could participate just in a smaller way.

Tricia Sciortino:

I love that. I think those are great tips on how to say no tactfully.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right. Yeah, and so is there ever a reason for us to explain our no?

Tricia Sciortino:

No.

Tricia Sciortino:

No. I mean, you want to give courtesy. It’s actually one of the things I learned from… For those you don’t know, years ago, it used to be the virtual assistant to Michael Hyatt. If you know who he is, Michael Hyatt & Co., And a lot of people requested his time and as his virtual assistant, I was the one saying no to a lot of things on his behalf. And so I would say, “Okay, how do you want me to turn these people down?” And he’s like, “Here’s a one-sentence canned response I want you to send to every single no.” It was just one simple sentence. Thank you for the invitation, unfortunately, at this time on unable to XYZ. That’s it, period.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

You don’t need to go into I’m traveling that week. I’m on vacation. He’s like they don’t… Just this one simple, thank you so much, unfortunately, no.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

Tricia Sciortino:

And honestly, I’ve seen it work a thousand times with him and so now I use it for myself. So I think it’s, you’re kind, you’re thankful, but it’s a no,

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well, and remembering that, No. Is a complete sentence. It doesn’t have to be no, it can just be no. That’s it.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And no is enough.

Tricia Sciortino:

No is enough.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, we don’t need to be yes men. I say it all the time. Right? I say this to our team, our leadership team here, you all aren’t here because I want you to be a bunch of yes, men.

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s right.

Tricia Sciortino:

So anybody can be a yes-man. Great leaders know when to say no.

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s right. Well, that is a great transition into our download, our takeaway for this week’s episode of One Next Step, we are sharing our canned email responses. So look at that right there. You don’t even have to think about it. We’re already giving that to you. We’ve developed several email responses to common requests we receive like speaking engagements or interviews. We actually did this with our team about a year ago, maybe 18 months ago. It’s a great way to help you say no. You can copy and paste them into an email or edit them to make them your own. Overall, they will help you put into practice just what T and I have talked about today.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes. I think it’s a very helpful tool. It’s something that I’ve used for others and I use today for myself. To get a copy, text the phrase one next step to 31996 or visit onenextsteppodcast.com and you’ll get access to today’s resources to help you keep moving forward.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I love that.

Tricia Sciortino:

Thank you guys for joining us today. Remember saying yes to you may mean saying no to somebody else and that’s okay. Until next time own your journey, it’s your life and your business. It’s up to you to create the life and organization you want. Join us next week for more practical tips and actionable tools to advance your business one step at a time.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Start by making today count.

Speaker 1:

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