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About This Episode

This week, Lisa and Tricia continue their conversation about the Enneagram with the author of The Road Back to You, Ian Morgan Cron. In this episode, he shares highlights of Enneagram numbers 6 through 9, what motivates them, and what it’s like to work with them.

As an Enneagram expert, trained psychotherapist and priest, Ian knows personality types inside and out. He helps us better understand how the Enneagram can be such a helpful tool for the workplace or really any relationship in your life.

1. Every Enneagram number is capable of being a healthy, good leader.

Sometimes, certain people only associate specific numbers with leadership. But that’s wrong. For example, because nines are more quiet and laid back, they may not receive as much consideration for leadership positions. But some of the world’s best leaders, including some of America’s best presidents, were nines. The truth is, any number that is healthy and self aware has the potential to be a very good leader.

2. Hire based on character, not Enneagram number.

Look at someone’s ethics and hard skills before even considering their Enneagram number. Those are the most important things. Once that’s in place, you can look at the number and see how they fit with the rest of the team. But that’s completely secondary to everything else. And never hire a number just based on needing that point of view. You might want to bring in a contractor or consultant to provide that perspective instead.

3. People who are healthy within their number are emotionally intelligent.

These types of people make the best leaders. Not only are they emotionally intelligent, they are fully self aware. They realize that their perspective isn’t the only perspective, and it’s okay and normal to hold another view. They understand the needs and benefits of seeking out other points of view, and they approach conversations keeping the other person’s opinion in mind.

Can you think of anyone who is a 6, 7, 8 or 9 on your team? Why do you think they identify as that number?
Why do you believe some people only associate certain numbers with leadership?
What is your biggest takeaway from the last two episodes about the Enneagram?
How do you plan on implementing what we’ve learned about the Enneagram into your workplace?

The Enneagram reveals the unconscious motivation behind the way we act, think, and feel from moment to moment.

Ian Morgan Cron

Don’t hire to fill a type. Hire first for character, competence, and self-awareness.

Ian Morgan Cron

The Enneagram isn’t the genie answer to all things, it is just one data point among others.

Ian Morgan Cron

This is a typing system, not a stereotyping system.

Ian Morgan Cron

(02:23) Ian Cron gives a quick overview of what the Enneagram is.
(03:06) A quick recap of Enneagram numbers one through 5.
(03:36) Ian gives a short description of Enneagram numbers 6 through 9.
(06:19) The do’s and dont’s of working with a 6.
(08:16) Sevens are the “party people” and no one makes better entrepreneurs.
(10:53) When an 8 walks into a room, their immediate attention goes toward who has the power.
(14:33) The do’s and don’ts of dealing with a 9.
(18:07) People falsely sometimes don’t associate a certain number with being a leader, and that’s a shame.
(19:28) You hire for character and competency first, not based on Enneagram number.
(21:53) Ian’s number one suggestion for leaders who want to incorporate the Enneagram into their workplace.
(24:34) The importance of being emotionally intelligent within your number.
(25:36) Because other people don’t see the world the way I do, it doesn’t mean their wrong.
(27:06) Enter to win a free copy of Ian Morgan Cron’s popular book on the Enneagram, The Road Back to You. To Enter, go write a review of the One Next Step podcast on Apple Podcasts or Google Podcasts. Then, take a screenshot of your review and email it to podcast@belaysolutions.com. When you send us the email, we’ll reply to confirm that your entry was received, but hurry as we’ll be selecting the winners by the end of the week.

Ian Cron:
You know, it’s interesting. I have HR people all the time say to me, “Oh, I’m going to use the Enneagram for hiring.” And I go, “Tap the brakes. Hold on a sec.” I always tell people, “You hire for character first, because any one of these numbers could be a crook. So hire for character first.”

Tricia:
Yeah.

Speaker 2:
Welcome to One Next Step. The most practical business podcast in the world, helping you get more done, grow your business and lead your team with confidence, with tips and tools you didn’t get in business school. Here are your hosts, Tricia Sciortino and Lisa Zeeveld.

Tricia:
Welcome to One Next Step, the practical business podcast that helps you run your business and make it stop running you, so you can enjoy your work and your life. I’m Tricia Sciortino, the CEO of BELAY.

Lisa:
And I’m Lisa Zeeveld, the COO of BELAY. Together we are T and LZ. We’ve known each other since 2005 and have worked together for a decade, growing a 100% remote business from startup to being recognized on the Inc5000 fastest growing companies list for six years running.

Tricia:
LZ and I have learned a lot along the way, and we have made some great friends. For One Next Step, we’re inviting them on the podcast to bring you episodes filled with excellent content delivered by some talented people. We’re excited to continue our conversation about the Enneagram and how to interact with all personality types at work. We’re joined again by Ian Cron. Today he’s sharing highlights of Enneagram numbers, six through nine, what motivates them and what it’s like to work with them.

Lisa:
Our first conversation with Ian was so enlightening. I mean, wow. So much to talk about with just the first five Enneagram types. I can’t wait to dive into number six through nine. Ian Cron, boy, he knows personality types inside and out. The Enneagram expert trained psychotherapist and priest gave us a glimpse into five personality types last week. Today we continue that conversation as he introduces us to four more.

Tricia:
He has shown us that the Enneagram can be such a helpful tool for the workplace, or really any relationship in our lives. So I’m so excited to hear about the rest of the types. Let’s jump in.

Lisa:
All right, Ian. Thank you for joining us again. Everybody got their glass of water? This has been intense and I’m loving it. So just in case somebody is joining us for the first time on this part two, do you mind just quickly describing what the Enneagram is for us?

Ian Cron:
Yeah. So the Enneagram is this wonderful ancient personality typing system. It teaches that there are nine basic personality types in the world, one of which we gravitate toward and adopt in childhood as a way to cope and as a way to navigate the new world of relationships. Very importantly, the Enneagram reveals the unconscious motivation that powerfully influences the way that type acts thinks and feels from moment to moment on a daily basis.

Lisa:
That’s awesome.

Tricia:
I love living life through the Enneagram. So will you just quickly recap one through five for us? And then I’m looking forward to really just digging into six through nine.

Ian Cron:
Sure. Well, as we learned in the first half of this conversation, ones are called the improvers, twos are called the helpers, threes are called the performers, fours are called the individualists, and fives are called the investigators.

Tricia:
Good stuff, improvers, not perfectionists anymore.

Lisa:
That’s right. Yes.

Lisa:
All right, so T, now the tables are turned and we’re going to get to eight. So we’re going to learn about you.

Tricia:
We’re getting there. We have a couple more to go. I can’t wait. Yes, let’s talk about sixes. I can’t wait.

Ian Cron:
Yeah. So sixes are called the loyalists. These folks are committed, they’re practical, they’re loyal as one might imagine. And they can be at times the wittiest number on the Enneagram. Sixes are motivated by a need to feel safe, secure, and supported in what feels to them like a chaotic unpredictable world, if not dangerous world. So six is our worst case scenario thinkers who are always scanning the horizon, looking for what can go wrong. And in fact, they’ll spot in a project for example, they’re the first ones to spot what could go wrong in this plan. Okay.

Ian Cron:
Sevens are called the enthusiasts. They’re the joy bombs of the Enneagram. They’re fun, spontaneous, adventurous. They’re motivated by a need to be happy, to plan stimulating experiences in service to avoiding difficult, painful feelings. Okay.

Ian Cron:
Eights, the challengers. Commanding, intense, confrontational, at times domineering. Eights are motivated by a need to be strong and to assert control and strength over others in the environment in order to avoid revealing weakness or vulnerability.

Tricia:
I don’t know what you’re talking about.

Ian Cron:
We’ll find out.

Tricia:
Yeah.

Ian Cron:
Nines are called the peacemakers. They’re pleasant, laid back accommodating, go with the flow, don’t rock the boat people. They’re motivated by a need to keep the peace, to merge with other people or groups of people, and to avoid conflict at all costs.

Lisa:
Yeah. As I said before, it’s fascinating. I’m just picking out names as you’re going through those numbers. Like yep, I know who that is. Yep.

Ian Cron:
Yeah. And of course, I’m only giving you the bare bones descriptions. In the book, The Road Back to You that I wrote and in other places, I could write a hundred pages on each of these types.

Tricia:
Everyone needs to get the book. Such a good book, especially if you’re new.

Ian Cron:
Well, thank you.

Tricia:
We went through it and read it and loved it.

Ian Cron:
Yeah. So as you know, there’s a ton more to know. I’m giving very, very general thumbnail sketches of each of the types.

Tricia:
No, but it’s great. So let’s dive in and dig into six. What motivates a six? What we need to know about a six. How a six, we can work with in the workplace.

Ian Cron:
Right. So by way of reminder, these are people who are motivated by a need to feel safe, secure, and supported in the world. So here’s some dos you want to do with a six. You want to listen patiently when sixes ask questions about new initiatives, and you need to address their concerns. What you don’t want to do with the six is become impatient. They have a lot of questions. But what are we going to do if this happens? What are we going to do if that happens? What are we going to do if this happens? And if you dismiss them or if you don’t answer all the questions, they will not get on board with you. They will not follow you. They just won’t follow you. All right.

Ian Cron:
But when they do follow you, they’re the most loyal number on the Enneagram. They’ll follow you off a cliff. But they won’t if they feel like, because here’s the danger, some leaders will interpret all their questions as they’re either being insubordinate or not trusting them or undermining them. That’s not it. What the six is doing is trying to figure out, have you thought through everything that could go wrong? And do you have a contingency plan for everything that could go wrong? I just need to know for sure. And I will do anything you ask me if I know you have thought through everything, right?

Lisa:
Yeah.

Tricia:
I love our sixes.

Ian Cron:
Oh my gosh. I have such a love affair with sixes. I love them. Another thing would be just be transparent. Sixes can smell a slickster a mile away. They’re people who are just naturally suspicious that other people have hidden agendas. So you do not want to give them the impression, they don’t like people who love office politics. They just want everyone to be honest. They want people to be treated fairly, and you have to deliver on what you promise. It’s very important to say this.

Lisa:
Sure. Yeah.

Ian Cron:
You want to talk about sevens?

Lisa:
Yeah, sevens.

Tricia:
Yes. The party people, the fun lovers.

Ian Cron:
But let me also just say this about sevens. Nobody makes a better entrepreneur than a seven. So many of the sevens I’ve worked with in the corporate world are people who started the company. They are so talented, smart, quick-witted, are able to see patterns and overlapping, ideas. They know how to put things together. They can see things no one else sees. And they bring so much optimism and energy to teams. They bring this can-do kind of spirit, like we can do this, we can crush it. You know what I mean?

Tricia:
Yeah.

Ian Cron:
We can take down Apple. They have that kind of effusiveness. They’re the person you want to see the first thing you walk in the door of the office, you know what I mean? So the dos. You want to give talented sevens a long leash in a multifaceted job description, and you need to encourage them to stay on track because they’re easily distracted. As little kids, sometimes sevens will be misdiagnosed as having ADHD.

Tricia:
Oh, interesting.

Lisa:
Interesting.

Ian Cron:
When in reality, they’re just sevens. They just need to go outside and play a lot more. They just need to burn off a lot more energy. And so with a seven, they’re visionaries. So you want to take advantage of their ability to synthesize information and as I mentioned earlier, to spot the unseen, the unseen patterns and to connect the dots inside complex bodies of information. They’re incredible at that. At the same time, what you have to do is make sure that they don’t let their optimism… Let me put it this way. Fives, sixes, and sevens, all wrestle with fear. Underlying anxiety. A six deals with their fear through pessimism at their worst. A seven deals with fear through optimism. You know what I’m saying?

Tricia:
Oh, wow. Yeah.

Ian Cron:
Like they cope with fear. There’s a silver lining to everything. Oh, the company is going bankrupt? Well, here’s the great side of that. We’re really going to learn a lot when we start the next company. You know what I mean?

Tricia:
Right.

Lisa:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Ian Cron:
What you have to say, you really need to say to them, no. That’s not what’s happening here. Do not put a silver lining on this moment. We need to act. We can’t be naive. We can’t put our heads in the sand.

Tricia:
Yeah, yeah.

Ian Cron:
So you just have to make sure that they don’t wallpaper over problems and failures to avoid painful feelings. They just don’t want to feel painful feelings.

Tricia:
Ignore it.

Lisa:
Yeah.

Ian Cron:
Yeah. That’s really important. So eights, amazing human beings. Eights will test authority. Okay now, Tricia, watch out. Eights will test authority. When an eight walks into a room, their attention immediately goes toward who has the power in here? Who is the authority figure? They want to engage immediately with the environment and other people. They’re going to move toward the person with power to figure out, does this person really have the juice? If there’s no leader in here, trust me, the eight’s going to try and make a bid for the leadership.

Tricia:
They’re sizing up the room and everybody in it.

Ian Cron:
Absolutely. And they’re just checking them, and they want to know, is the leader trustworthy? Does the leader have the strength and the moxie to lead the eight? They’re asking that question. And so they’re going to test the authority in very subtle or not subtle ways, depending on how self-aware they are. So with an eight, I tell people you’ve got to set limits, you got to provide regular feedback and you’ve got to be straightforward. So let me give you an example. You’re doing a 360 on a two. You do not want to do a 360 on a two like you would on an eight. You’ll crush a two with that kind of directness. You just can’t.

Ian Cron:
But if you go in to an eight, you could say to eight’s like this, you could walk through an eight in a 360 and go, “Frankly, I think you’ve been an idiot. You’ve been rude or you’ve been bossy, or you’re this, or you’re that.” They’ll go, “Oh, okay. I can work on that.” You know what I’m saying? It’s like, you’re not going to hurt their feelings. You’re not going to hurt an eight’s feelings. It’s pretty hard. I would say that you almost, you have to always tell an eight the truth. Tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.

Tricia:
So help you God.

Ian Cron:
So help you God. And even if the truth is horrible, tell the eight everything. and if you don’t, the eight will lose trust in you and it takes a long time to get an eight’s trust back. It does. Like a six, eights are typically a little suspicious of other people and what they’re up to. They don’t like the idea that someone could pull the wool over their eyes. So they’re just a little skeptical, a little bit.

Ian Cron:
They’re fantastic human beings. I love it. Some of my closest friends are eights. When they’re healthy, they’re arguably the most popular number on the Enneagram in social settings.

Lisa:
Wow.

Ian Cron:
When they’re unhealthy, they tend to bang guardrail to guardrail through relationships and organizations. So again, all these types are like I said, if they’re self-aware, they’re fantastic. When they’re not self-aware, they can be a big challenge.

Tricia:
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Lisa:
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Ian Cron:
Nines, the dos with a nine, the peacemaker is you want to establish clear expectations and performance goals. Nines tend to have the least amount of stamina on the Enneagram. They’re so easy going. Sometimes if they’re not very healthy, people will think they’re a little spacey and not very motivated. And they can get distracted. You need to say to them, “Okay, here’s your responsibility. Here are the expectations. Here are the performance goals. Do you understand them?” I always get a verbal from a nine. “Do you understand what I’m saying?” Yes. “And you agree that this is what you’re going to do, right?” Yes. Because if you don’t, sometimes a resistant nine because they’re conflict avoidant, they won’t tell you that they don’t like what you’re saying.

Lisa:
Oh, yes.

Tricia:
Oh, yeah.

Ian Cron:
And then they may be thinking to themselves, okay, you can tell me all this, but I’m actually not going to tell you that I’m not going to do it or I’m only going to half do it. I’m only going to put half my heart into it. So I’m always telling people, and I do this in marriage counseling. I do this in corporate settings. It’s like, you’ve got to circle back to the nine, you go, “You’re on board, right? Please let me know if you’re on board or if you’re not on board.” Because if you don’t, the nine might harbor feelings of resistance or not, and be passive aggressive.

Lisa:
Yes, sure.

Tricia:
Well, my husband’s a nine, Ian. So he’s going to listen to this and be mad. But I practice that at home with him. To your point, I have to go back after we kind of spoke about something and agreed on something. I have to go back later, a couple days a week later and go, “Hey, remember? We agreed. We’re doing this, right?” I have to check back in with him and make sure that he hasn’t changed his mind, or didn’t falsely agree because he didn’t want to create conflict and reaffirm, like you meant yes, right?

Ian Cron:
Yes. And here’s the thing. You have to encourage nines to express their personal opinions and their preferences rather than allowing them to mirror yours or those of the group. So that’s very important too. And for example in a meeting, nines tend to be quieter. Eight’s will be going, “I have a suggestion.” Sevens will be going, “I’ve got a suggestion.” Threes have suggestions. Ones have suggestions. Fives might be quieter. Fours possibly, depending on what’s going on. Sixes will have an opinion in case they think something’s going to go wrong. I may say to the nine, I will get everyone quiet and I’ll go, “Bob or Joan,” whatever their name is, “I really want to hear from you what you’re thinking.”

Ian Cron:
And they may go, “I don’t know. I’m kind of agreeing with everybody else. Everything sounds great.” And I’ll go, “No, no, no. I want to know what you think. I already know what the group thinks. I want to know what you think.” And invariably, they come up with some insight that nobody else had.

Tricia:
Yeah. That’s good. We have a nine in our leadership group.

Ian Cron:
Yep.

Tricia:
Exactly, yeah.

Ian Cron:
Well, nines sometimes we get in a group of a team let’s say and they’ll think, well, everybody else’s opinions feel so much stronger than mine. I’ll just go along with what everyone else is doing because it just seems so much more important to them than it does to me. And I’m like, no, but I’m not letting you get off the hook. I’m going to lean into you and make sure that we hear from you, because you have gifts to bring us.

Tricia:
That’s a good takeaway, because I lead a nine. So thank you for the reminder as that person’s leader, to continue to ask their individual opinion and not let them say, “I just agree with what everybody has said already.”

Ian Cron:
Yeah. And you know what’s so interesting? Is that a lot of times there are certain numbers that people don’t associate with leadership. And that’s a shame because it’s not true. I can name you great leaders of every single type. Corporate leaders, political leaders, movement leaders, whatever. And people look at nines and they go, well, they’re kind of slow going people. The best American presidents have all been nines. So I’m always telling people, be careful about stereotyping. This is a typing system, not a stereotyping system. So a healthy nine can lead the free world, literally.

Tricia:
Literally, wow. That’s amazing.

Lisa:
Yeah. It’s been really eyeopening, because I think that I’ve spent a lot of time reading about the Enneagram, but it was more personal. And so I really like how you flip this because as I said a couple of times now, I’m thinking of people in our team and people I work with and really being able to see their unique contributions and how important it is. I would think as a leadership team, that if you have an opportunity to build that… Some of us were kind of put into a team and then we figured out what the numbers were. But would you recommend that if you have an opportunity to build a team and have some diversity in the types, that there’s value in that?

Ian Cron:
You know, it’s interesting. I have HR people all the time say to me, “Oh, I’m going to use the Enneagram for hiring.” And I go, “Tap the brakes, hold on a second.” First of all I always tell people, “You hire for character first, because any one of these numbers could be a crook. So hire for character. Hire for character first, then hire for competency. Can they actually do the job?” Then I would say, “Hire for self-awareness.” And as part of that, does the person know themselves and know how to self-regulate? Can they collaborate? Can they be inclusive? Can they bring out the best in others? And then I say just don’t think to yourself, oh, we’re missing a three or we’re missing a five. We’ve got to hire that. That’s a little short-sighted. It has to be one data point among others.

Ian Cron:
Sometimes people get so enamored with the Enneagram that they think it’s like the genie answer immediately to all things. And I’m like, be careful. It’s not that. The other thing is also a little bit, it’s industry dependent. So I’ve worked with companies where it was all threes and eights in let’s say senior leadership. And I’ve looked at what they do. I look how they get along. And I think they don’t need a four. If they need a four one day, they can get a consultant who’s a four. They can bring somebody in to bring the four perspective. They don’t necessarily have to spend the money and inset the energy to find a four if they’re making nuts and bolts or doing construction stuff where they don’t need a four.

Ian Cron:
They can use an architect who’s a four. They make great fours, they make phenomenal architects. I was listening to a podcast the other day about this guy that designed the Memorial for 9/11, for the 9/11 Memorial and I’m thinking, this guy’s a four even though he’s an engineer. People go, that’s a stereotype. Can a four be an engineer? Absolutely. But his artistic vision he had, the aesthetic vision he had for that Memorial, the philosophy, the spirituality of that Memorial, it’s pure four. Just pure four stuff going on. So again, you can hire that if you need to, outside temporarily, for a consultant. So it just depends on the company. Some companies don’t need the representation of certain types.

Lisa:
I like that. Well, what is your number one suggestion? We’re the most practical business podcast. That’s what we’d like to say, self-proclaimed. What is your number one suggestion for leaders wanting to successfully implement the Enneagram in their workplace?

Ian Cron:
Well, obviously I’m going to be self promotional here. I really encourage leaders to read my book, The Road Back to You: An Enneagram Journey to Self Discovery, only because it’s the most accessible book out there as a primmer on the Enneagram. One of the reasons I wrote the book was because as I read other books, I could show them to you on my bookshelf, they’re 5-600 pages and they’re very technical and a little dry. And so, there was no book out there that you could read and go, okay, I know enough now about the Enneagram and all these styles that I could make a difference in my life without reading another book. Or this is a great introduction, now I’m ready to go down the wormhole to the 500 page book.

Ian Cron:
The second thing that you can do, I encourage people to do is listen to my podcast, Typology. On Typology, what I do is I interview all these different types so you can hear from their mouth. I’m just describing other people, but when you hear it from them, it comes alive in a way that it doesn’t when I’m describing it, their different types. On my website, they can go and look at the iEQ9 Enneagram assessment. It is the best Enneagram assessment out there. And it’s really geared, in many ways to the corporate world. You get between a 22 and a 44 page report after hearing about your type. So it’s a fantastic thing. They could go to Ian Cron, actually I-A-N-M-O-R-G-A-N-C-R-O-N, ianmorgancron.com. And they could hit the tab for iEQ9. And I can’t tell you how helpful it’s been to so many corporations and leaders.

Tricia:
Yes.

Lisa:
Great.

Tricia:
Thank you so much, Ian. I appreciate your time. I appreciate walking through each and every one of these Enneagram types. To all our listeners out there, go to Ian’s website, read his book. I’ve read it. It’s a great introduction to Enneagrams, great relevant information. Ian, I’m going to go to your website and get myself some resources off there.

Lisa:
I am too.

Tricia:
I know. But thank you. Thank you so much for being with us today.

Ian Cron:
My pleasure. I always love talking to smart people about the Enneagram.

Tricia:
Thank you.

Lisa:
I tell you what, Ian was phenomenal. I think I could have talked with him for like four more episodes.

Tricia:
I know. We could do an episode per Enneagram number.

Lisa:
I know. And I’m a little embarrassed to say that I have not subscribed yet to his podcast, Typology but I’m doing it today.

Tricia:
Right now. I’m with you.

Lisa:
Yeah, right now I’m going to do it. Tell me T, it was a lot to digest. But what were some of your key takeaways?

Tricia:
I know I loved it. I think the biggest thing was really how we talked about being emotionally intelligent in your number.

Lisa:
Yeah.

Tricia:
I’ve always heard the terminology being healthy or unhealthy, but I like how he really reframed that for me to say, you want to be emotionally intelligent in your number. So that was a big takeaway, and there were some really good reminders in there. Like I said about I lead people of different numbers, so just some good reminders of meeting them where they are. We kind of kid around, I’m an eight. So sometimes I think I’m the only type in a room.

Lisa:
Your number is the best number, right?

Tricia:
I was like, is there any other number? I thought this was the only way people thought. But it was just a good reminder that there are nine actual ways people show up in the world and they’re all normal.

Lisa:
Yeah.

Tricia:
Not just mine. So that to me was just a great reminder, super impactful. A big takeaway for me. How about you?

Lisa:
Yeah, I would agree. I mean, it’s the diversity of thought, right? It’s knowing that because I’m a one and I’m going to find all the details and look to make things better in the world, because other people don’t see the world the same way I do, doesn’t mean they’re wrong. And really finding where they can enrich my life and our work product by seeking out those other types. But how he really corrected me and other HR leaders by saying, we’re not going to hire to find that. If you have a gap, then you can always bring in a consultant or bring in a coach or look for that. But that first and foremost, you want to look for someone that’s ethical. You want to look for somebody who has the hard skill set to do the job, and somebody who is emotionally intelligent because whatever their number is, if they’re emotionally intelligent, they’re going to add value to your organization.

Tricia:
Could not agree more. Yeah.

Lisa:
Really, really good stuff. Hey guys, if you have not had a chance, please go back. I’m going to say this right now. Please go back and listen to episode one, part one. It is really, really good. And it really does do a great job of diving into numbers, types one through five.

Lisa:
So now it is time for the One Next Step. As the most practical business podcast, we want to make sure taking action is easy. So with each episode, we’re going to offer you one next step to propel you and your business forward. Today’s next step is to enter to win a free copy of Ian Morgan Cron’s popular book on the Enneagram, and he just got done talking about it and suggesting it, The Road Back to You. Man, that’s a good one. Enter to win by writing a review of the One Next Step podcast on Apple podcast or Google podcast, then take a screenshot of your review and email it to podcast@belaysolutions.com. That’s podcast@BELAYsolutions.com. When you send us an email, we’ll reply to confirm that your entry was received. But hurry, as we’ll be selecting the winners by the end of the week.

Lisa:
And we encourage you to also check out Ian’s free guide, How to Lead and Work By Enneagram Type, which he generously shared in part one. You can access it now in the show notes onenextsteppodcast.com.

Tricia:
There is no way for us to go deep on every Enneagram type on this podcast, even with a two part series. So if you want to learn more about your type and others, we highly recommend you get Ian’s book, The Road Back to You. Remember you can win a copy. All you have to do is write a review of the podcast on Apple podcast or Google podcast. Take a screenshot from your computer or smartphone and email that screenshot to podcast@belaysolutions.com. Good luck.

Lisa:
Thank you so much for listening to this episode of One Next Step. We hope you’ve enjoyed what you’re hearing from us. And now, we want to hear from you. Head on over to Apple podcast, Spotify, or wherever you listen and leave us a review.

Tricia:
Until next time, own your journey. It’s your life and your business. It’s up to you to create the life and organization you want. Join us next week for more practical tips and actionable tools to advance your business one step at a time.

Lisa:
Start by making today count.

Speaker 2:
Thanks for listening to One Next Step. Be sure to subscribe on Apple podcasts or follow us on Spotify, then join us next time for more practical business tips and tools to help you get more done, grow your business and lead your team with confidence. For more episodes, show notes and helpful resources visit onenextsteppodcast.com.

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