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About This Episode

In this week’s episode, Lisa and Tricia talk with someone who is highly respected both in the for-profit and nonprofit world — Jeff Henderson. He’ll discuss a concept most entrepreneurs think about as they are launching but usually leave behind in the hustle and bustle of a task-oriented workplace.

 

During those early days when you are trying to get your feet off the ground, you may not have the time or cash flow for your team to strategize and plan big. What leaders sometimes fail to focus on is — what are the true needs of our customers? How can we meet them where they are? And the biggest concept: why doing good is just plain good business. 

 

Your One Next Step

 

Download Jeff Henderson’s Know What You’re FOR Toolkit. Included are four resources that will assist you in more intentional communication and equip you with ways to demonstrate your dedication to your customers, your team, your community and yourself. You’ll get access to an organizational assessment that will help you discover how effective your team is performing FOR others, as well as a weekly social media plan to help you show consistent appreciation for your customers and team. This toolkit will help you close the gap between who you want to be and who people believe you are, both as a person and an organization

 

Download Now

 

In each episode, we highlight one next step for you and provide an activation or delegation guide to help you immediately take action, start applying what you learn, and get your team to help you.

1. Perception is reality.

In today’s world, a business is no longer what it tells the customer it is. A business is what its customers tell other customers it is. Your perception in the community is extremely important – and it’s affected by everything from how you interact with your customers on the phone to your social media presence to how clean your workplace is. Make sure you are putting yourself out there in a way that will attract more customers. 

2. Shrink the gap between what you’re known for and what you want to be known for.

The first step is actually identifying what you are known for. Then, everyday you should be trying to close that gap. We are all a work in progress. The best leaders are always working to be more than what they are today. Using self awareness, and even talking to others in the community, find out what your business is known for and begin moving towards what you want it to be. 

3. Make sure you are keeping the “social” in social media.

Take a look at your social media feed. Is it all about your business and how awesome you are? Or do you put the focus more on your customers and community? Are you the hero or are they? Are you interacting with your followers in the comments and threads, or is it your social media just a one-way communications tool? Make sure your social media accounts are engaging with your followers. That’s one easy way to build loyalty and trust with potential customers. 

Who do you believe your company is known for? Is there a gap between what it’s known for and what you want it to be known for?
How would you or one of your team members answer the question, “What does it feel like to work here?”
Take a look at one of your social media feeds, such as Instagram. How would you say it reflects your business – is it all about your company or is it others-focused?
What are some practical ways your company can do good in your community?

If you want to create an others focused business, you've got to be for the customer, for the team, for the community and for you.

Jeff Henderson

You should show up every day to close the gap between what you want to be known for and what you are known for.

Jeff Henderson

You have to be remarkable, and when you do remarkable things, that allows customers to remark about you. It creates a remark-able business.

Jeff Henderson

How your team is treated is eventually how the customer is treated.

Jeff Henderson

(04:37) Jeff talks about having the world’s ugliest driver’s licence photo. 

(06:50) What exactly does Jeff mean by “doing good is good for business?”

(07:28) “A business is no longer what it tells customers it is. A business is what customers tell other customers it is.”

(10:45) What are some practical ways an organization can do good?

(12:24) Thriving businesses in a community help improve the world. 

(13:03) Ask yourself, “What does it feel like to work here?”

(16:26) How do you shift the mindset of leaders and help them understand that doing good is important and isn’t just fluff?

(19:22) Meet people where they are instead of asking them to come to you.

(22:06) Talk more about your customer and your community than you do yourself. 

(22:55) How do I change my messaging to be more people-focused?

(25:15) Most organizations forget the “social” in “social media.”

(26:33) We need to tell our customers and people we are serving, “I see you. I hear you. I believe in you.”

(33:27) This week’s one next step: Download Jeff Henderson’s Know What You’re FOR Toolkit. It includes four resources to help you more intentionally communicate and demonstrate that you are for your customers, your team, your community and yourself.

Tricia Sciortino:

Guess what guys? I wrote a new book, Rise Up and Lead Well: How Leveraging an Assistant Will Change Your Life and Maximize Your Time. An assistant is the secret weapon you need to level up your leadership in the new year. Someone should be in your corner, managing the details, so you stay focused on the priorities. I’ve spent more than a decade at BELAY, a virtual assisting company, and I’ve led VAs, trained them, and even worked as one early in my career. I’ve seen all sides and know the secrets for success. Use my new book to get a clear plan for how to effectively use an assistant. This isn’t fluff, or theory, or inspiration. It’s battle tested tactics that really work. Find it on Amazon on January 26.

 

Jeff Henderson:

A business is no longer what it tells customers it is. The business is what customers tell other customers it is. You have to be remarkable and when you do remarkable things, then that allows customers to remark about you. It creates a remark-able business.

 

Speaker 3:

Welcome to One Next Step, the most practical business podcast in the world. Helping you get more done, grow your business, and lead your team with confidence, with tips and tools you didn’t get in business school. Here are your hosts, Trisha Sciortino and Lisa Zeeveld.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Welcome to One Next Step, the practical business podcast that helps you run your business and make it stop running you so you can enjoy your work and your life. I’m Tricia Sciortino, the CEO of BELAY.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

And I am Lisa Zeeveld, the COO of BELAY. Together, we’re T & LZ. We’ve known each other since 2005, and have had the privilege of working together for a decade. We’ve grown a 100% remote business from startup to be in recognized on the Inc 5,000 fastest growing companies list for six years running.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

LZ and I have learned a lot along the way and have made some great friends.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

For the One Next Step, we are inviting them onto the podcast to bring you episodes filled with excellent content, delivered by some talented people.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Today we are talking with someone who was highly respected, both in the for-profit and non-profit world, Jeff Henderson. He is extremely accomplished and knows a lot about marketing.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Today, he will be talking with us about a concept most entrepreneurs think about as they’re launching. However, the concept usually gets left behind in the hustle and bustle of a task oriented workplace.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, those early days, when you are trying to get your feet off the ground, you may not have the time, or more importantly, the cashflow for your team to strategize and plan big, so you aren’t just making the thing or providing the service. What leaders fail to focus on is, what are the true needs of our customers? How can we meet them where they are? In the biggest concept, why doing good is just plain good business.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Jeff was recently named by Forbes Magazine as one of the 20 speakers you shouldn’t miss, and I can tell you, he’s spoken at BELAY and we couldn’t agree more.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

He has led multiple churches, worked in marketing at Chick-fil-A, for the Atlanta Braves, Callaway Gardens and Lake Linear Islands. He’s launched many organizations and most recently started The FOR Company, who helps businesses, churches, and organizations grow.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Those are some pretty amazing accomplishments, and he’s got the stories to go along with them. Jeff even wrote a book, and I am thrilled to read it. Titled, Know What You’re FOR: A Growth Strategy for Work, An Even Better Strategy for Life. I’m excited to hear what Jeff has to say about leading our companies, and how the right marketing strategy will not only show your customers you care, but how it can help your business thrive. Listen as we talk with Jeff.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Hey Jeff, thanks for joining us today on the podcast.

 

Jeff Henderson:

Tricia, Lisa, it’s great to see you, always great to be back with BELAY.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

You’re a fan favorite at BELAY, so we’re glad you’re back.

 

Jeff Henderson:

The last time I was with you, I remember when we used to get in a room, and we could actually do that.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Oh, in person.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah.

 

Jeff Henderson:

Yeah, Brian and Shannon Miles in the cheerleading outfits, I loved it, so that was awesome.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Oh yes, yes. I just shared the cow story is one of my favorites, but something that’s actually very practical is your notes of gratitude, still stays with me from the last time that you joined us at BELAY. So, thank you for always imparting your wisdom.

 

Jeff Henderson:

Well, I love what you all do, and thanks for having me.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah, great.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. So before we get started, I would love, we’re going to put you on the hot seat and ask you to share a fun or interesting fact about yourself. What about you, Jeff?

 

Jeff Henderson:

Well, like I told you before we recorded, I’m not the fun one in my marriage, my wife is the fun one, but, and I don’t have this because you’re going to go, “Oh no, everybody says that”, but I literally have the world’s ugliest driver’s license picture. And anytime I share that with people, they’re like, “You should see mine.” So what I’ve done, is I have a driver’s license competition. And this isn’t actually my current one, this was back in college. And every time I’ve shown this picture, I always win. Because when people go, “No, my driver’s license picture’s uglier.” I’m like, “Are you you ready?”

 

Jeff Henderson:

I’m a former pastor, so I probably should bet money, but I don’t. But I’ll tell you how bad this driver’s license picture is, when I got it renewed, they don’t let you keep your old license. But this picture was so bad, they cut it in half, and the guy gave me this picture back and said-

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Oh my gosh.

 

Jeff Henderson:

…”I think you need to keep this, we don’t want to keep it.”

 

Tricia Sciortino:

That’s awesome. I feel like you are leaving us hanging. We need to see this thing.

 

Jeff Henderson:

That’s why I said, I probably should come up with another, because I can’t show you. I will say this, I actually worked, my first sports marketing job was working with the Atlanta Braves. And I worked when, back in the Atlanta Fulton County Stadium days, and so that was the Freddie Brace fans, Dale Murphy, Phil Niekro, who had just recently passed away. So, but I loved sports and loved baseball, and so, but that stadium no longer exists, because as you all know, in Atlanta, we blow up stadium turf.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

I know. So dramatic, you Atlantans. So dramatic.

 

Jeff Henderson:

We can’t stay with it for long. We’ve built more stadiums than we’ve won championships here in the city of Atlanta.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

We keep hoping that the stadium is the key to the championship.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

If you build it, they will come, right?

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

But you know what they say, a poor craftsman will always blame his tools, right?

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Oh, nice.

 

Jeff Henderson:

Lisa, pulling out the craftsman quote.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

I know, It’s so good.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well, talking about good, what exactly do you mean by the quote, “doing good”?

 

Jeff Henderson:

Well, doing good is good for business. I think that’s a great strategy for businesses right now. And what I mean by that, is when you do something good, customers can comment back to you, and they will tell your friends. And here’s why this is important, when it comes to business, I know this sounds like something a former pastor, like myself would say. What does this guy know anything about business or marketing? But I spent in first part of my career in business, then in nonprofit, and now transitioning to help businesses and churches. And when it comes to business, this is true for a church, but a business is no longer what it tells customers it is, the business is what customers tell other customers it is. It all goes back to word of mouth advertising.

 

Jeff Henderson:

You have to be remarkable, and when you do remarkable things, then that allows customers to remark about you. It creates a remark-abel business. And so, when you do good, people notice it, and it doesn’t take an extraordinary amount of doing good. I remember when I worked at Chick-fil-A, and Truett Cathy, the founder of Chick-fil-A said that he went to the Ritz-Carlton, and they said, when he said “Thank you”, they said “My pleasure.” And he said, “Hey, I’m going to take that.”

 

Jeff Henderson:

And those two little words, over time, just “my pleasure”. It was a different take, it was honoring people in a different way, and that was a small way of doing good. And so for me, one of the things I really believe, when you look about the nonprofit and the for-profit world, just the way we talk about that, over here you have for profit, BELAY is for profit, and over here, we’re for purpose, you can be for both. And that’s one of the things I love about your organization, is that there’s a purpose behind it, and the more purpose you have, the more profit you’ll have, and the more profit you have, the more purpose you can fuel. And so, I think this whole idea of purpose and profit traveling together, I think it’s the future of business.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

People want to like who they do business with, right? Like me, you just want to like them, you want to believe that their purpose and their passion aligns with yours, and so, I don’t think anybody says, “I want to go buy something, or work with the company that does bad.” That just doesn’t ever come up.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Nobody wants a bad experience, yeah.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

“I want to work with those people that are just shysters, let me work with them.”

 

Jeff Henderson:

That’s where I give my hard-earned money towards.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, have a lackluster experience, right?

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Who wants to be mediocre? Nobody wants to brag about being a mediocre organization, right? You want to be, lit to your point, remarkable. You want to be stand-out. And even just having that as your purpose, to say our goal is to be an exceptional organization that provides and exceeds people’s perception of who we are. And then to your point, Jeff, who you think you are is great, but what other people think you are is the truth. Perception really is reality.

 

Jeff Henderson:

Right. That’s why I love just working with business leaders like yourself. And in fact, I think I was accused sometimes as a pastor, being a marketing person disguised as a pastor. But I just have so much respect for business leaders like yourself. An example would be Dana’s Spinella, who launched the Women’s Boutique Fabric. And they have a key performance indicator every day that they have to measure, or actually report back to the home office, and that is, “What did you do to wow the customer?” You have to deliver wow to at least one customer, so it’s not just your sales report for the day, but what was your wow. And that moment of wowing a customer, and knowing that you had to do it every single day, that’s a challenge. But it does, over time, it does add up.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, I love that. So let’s say you’re onboard and you believe everything you’re saying to be true, where it just is very easy, right? Okay, I see how having purpose and doing good in my organization helps my business. Can you give us some how to, some how will, how can and will an organization do good to help them achieve their goals and grow as an organization?

 

Jeff Henderson:

Absolutely. Well, the good news is, and I think this is a good… It’s challenging, but it’s good news. Research, when you look at marketing research, it’s showing that the younger you go in the demographic, the more they’re asking, “What are you doing to help make our community a better place? What are you doing to make the world a better place?” In fact, my friend, David Butler, who was the innovation director at Coca-Cola, he’s now the chief global marketing director for Kids2, they do Baby Einstein. So they’re looking at young moms, young parents and young demographic. And he was the first one, actually that I sent my book to. Wendy and I only have two kids, but it’s like our third child, here’s my third child, my book, tell me David, if you like the stuff.

 

Jeff Henderson:

So I’m waiting here to get this feedback from David. And he said, this is the, not my book is the future, but he goes, “What you’re talking about is the future.”, Because people are asking the question, “What are you doing?” But yes, can it be philanthropic? Absolutely. But it doesn’t necessarily have to be. An example of this, I tell all small business owners, one of the best things that you can do for our community, if you can afford to do this, is hire people, pay them as well as you possibly can, because that’s going to flow to the community. In other words, one of the best things that you can give our community is a healthy business. And one of the ways you change the world, and one of the ways you improve the world is one community at a time. So you have to ask the question, “How do communities improve?” If we want to improve the world.

 

Jeff Henderson:

Well, there’s lots of ways, but specifically, I think you have to have thriving businesses. If you don’t have thriving businesses in a community, that community will dry up. So when I talk to business leaders… Yeah, if you want to be philanthropic, that’s great, but I think you can run a well-run business and treat your team and your customers exceedingly well, and that’s a gift to the community. That’s one of the things I love about BELAY, that’s one of the things I saw when Brian and Shannon put on those cheerleading’s out outfits and all that, because one of the questions specifically, to talk to your question, Tricia, is a question I think every leader needs to ask is, “What does it feel like to work here? What does it feel like to work here?”

 

Jeff Henderson:

And the reason it’s so important to treat your staff exceedingly well, is how the team is treated is eventually how the customer is treated. Every single time. We could have business leaders that would say, “We have the best customer strategy in the world.”, but if they have a dysfunctional staff, and a dysfunctional staff culture, it eventually will flow to the customer.

 

Jeff Henderson:

I saw that when I worked at Chick-fil-A, when we would go to different competitors, and we would even go to our own stores, I would walk up to the counter and I could tell how the person behind the counter was being treated, because it was flowing right to me. So when I talk about doing good for goodness sake, and doing good is good for business, what I mean is that seeing people as people who have dreams, who have hopes, who have worries and fears, and how can a business platform serve people, and serve them really, really well.

 

Jeff Henderson:

And especially in my former industry, in quick service restaurant industry, you could see that sales results were tied into employee retention, and employee retention is so high in the QSR category. But one of the reasons Chick-fil-A is thriving is because their employee retention rate is so incredibly low. And you know why that is? Is because for the most part, those team members are treated incredibly well.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

If you’re anything like me, then keeping up with the daily tasks of AR, AP and account reconciliation are not your favorite things, but you also know how necessary and important it is. The good news is, it doesn’t have to be your thing anymore, BELAY can help.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Numbers are totally my thing, Tricia, and thankfully numbers are BELAY bookkeepers’ thing too. Our sponsor, BELAY, believes you deserve top notch bookkeepers to produce balance sheets, pay bills, reconcile bank and credit card statements, and monthly reports to keep you up to date on the numbers of your organization. Whether you’re a church, nonprofit, or a business, they have the right people ready to help. Talk to their team today and never lose sleep over your financials again. Get started by visiting belaysolutions.com/services/bookkeepers today.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

There are people out there who this idea of doing good, like you said earlier, feels a little squishy, feels like a pastor is telling them to do good. They’re having a hard time of looking at the profitability, and perhaps themselves, they’re not used to the idea of doing something good. So you said it has to come from the leadership team. The leadership team has to value, just like Brian and Shannon value us, and they have to be fun, and they have to communicate that so it can trickle down. But I think there’s probably some leaders out there who are listening, who probably don’t know how to do that. They maybe don’t even know, going back to the title of your business and your book, they don’t even know really what they’re for. They’re for-profits, so it’s like switching over, helping them switch over, that really doing good is good for business. So how do you work with individuals, leaders and shift that mindset?

 

Jeff Henderson:

Well, I asked them two questions, Lisa. First is, what do you want to be known for? What is your business known for? That’s your unique vision. That’s your unique strategy you want to bring to the marketplace.

 

Jeff Henderson:

The second question is, what are you known for? And so, that’s the customer’s reflection back to whether or not you were delivering on question number one. So the reality for any business is, there’s typically a gap. There’s a gap between what you want to be known for and what you are known for, and the goal for any leadership team, really the goal for any team, should be to come to work every day, and to shrink the gap between what we want to be known for and what we are known for, because there’s a gap with any organization, because there’s no perfect organization, there’s no perfect people.

 

Jeff Henderson:

But the reason that leaders need to be for people is the way that you close the gap between those two questions, is you have to be for four groups of people. You have to be for the customer. You have to be for the team. You have to be for the community. You have to have a larger purpose in mind, because if your goal in today’s world, if your goal is just to stay in business, you won’t. Because again, in a competitive landscape, customers are asking, “Who are you, and what are you doing?” And then ultimately, you need to be for you. One of the best gifts you can bring to your team is a healthy and inspired you. And so, when I teach leaders, and owners, and pastors as well, is that if you want to create an others focused business, which is where you need to go, then you’ve got to be for these four groups of people, for the customer, for the team, for the community and for you.

 

Jeff Henderson:

And for me, what happens is, is when you do that, it creates what I call an outside focus perspective versus a company focused perspective. And for example, when I was at Chick-fil-A, I would encourage operators to come out in front of the counter and see the businesses at noon when it was the busiest, and they would often say, “Jeff, no, no, no, you don’t understand, I’ve got to be behind the kitchen.” No, no, no, I understand that, and you need to do that, but if you never see this from the customer’s point of view, if you never see it from the team’s point of view, if you never see it from the community’s point of view, you’re missing something as a business leader.

 

Jeff Henderson:

And so I think ultimately, when they experience… This is why I tell church leaders, churches close every single week, probably every single day, and the community just drives right by because they never felt value beyond the four walls of the church. And in today’s world, you’ve got to get beyond the four walls of the business. That will bring people into the business, when you’re genuinely and authentically for them.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah, I love that.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. Well, and what a unique time to even make a statement like that, right? Where a lot of the four walls have so been dissipated because of the state of the world, where businesses and churches are trying to figure out how to thrive without those walls. And so you talk a little bit about, in this same realm, the importance of meeting people where they are, rather than asking them to come to you. So can you unpack that, that concept, a little bit, and as far as that strategy for success in business.

 

Jeff Henderson:

Well, I think I’m talking to the experts in terms of what this new world is. But, in fact, I was talking to a pastor in Australia, I’m helping some churches over there, and he said, the question they’re asking right now is what can we do for our community? Because our community is no longer coming to us, we got to go to them. And that’s exciting, and that’s great, but we should have been asking this question long before a global pandemic. And for me, give you an example, is when we launched our church at Gwinnett, which we bought this piece of property, and the city said, you could put a sign up that says, Gwinnett Church coming soon. I said, that’s exactly what I don’t want to do. That’s not the first statement I want to make. The first statement I want to make is just #forgwinnett, that’s what we are.

 

Jeff Henderson:

And I got feedback from people saying, “Hey, how are they going to know this as a church? How are they going to know this is a religious institution?” And I said, “Exactly, they’re not, they’re going to have to figure it out.” So what I want us to do is go into the community with t-shirts on that say, we’re for Gwinnett, and live this message out. To me, this isn’t a marketing slogan, it is who we are, as we are genuinely and authentically for people. And that’s why I tell business leaders, don’t leave out the humanity of the business. I appreciate the technology, we’re on technology today, your business is based on technology. I love it. I watched the online experience at Word Point Ministries, which is the organization I formerly worked with, so I love technology, but don’t lose and miss the humanity of the business.

 

Jeff Henderson:

And here’s why, and this is going to sound like a pastor, I totally get this, aliright, but hang with me. At the end of your days, the end of your life, you want to stand for something more than just going to work for nine to five for a few bucks… And business can stand for that. That’s why it always bothered me when people ask me, “When did you decide to go into full-time ministry?” I’m like, “I was already in full-time ministry.” And so for me, business is an opportunity to reach people. In fact, I tell business leaders, “You’re able to reach”… I was jealous of business leaders. I said, “You’re able to impact people that, as a pastor, I can’t even get close to.”

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Sure.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah.

 

Jeff Henderson:

So I just quit as a pastor and became an entrepreneur so I can reach people.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Can get in front of more people.

 

Jeff Henderson:

Yeah, but for me, I think just practically speaking, business is such a huge platform. But I think to tell people now, “Hey, we want to go out in the community.” And one of our social media strategies is, Gwinnett Church was to talk, and I tell this to business leaders as well, talk more about your customer in your community than you do yourself.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Sure.

 

Jeff Henderson:

Because when I worked with a lot of organizations, I’ll look at their Instagram feed, and I’ll show it to them, and I’ll say, “Now hang with me, this is going to sound a little critical, but if a business was a person, many businesses would be considered narcissists, because as I look at your Instagram feed, it’s all about how great you are, and how great your products are, and I get that, I totally understand that, but it says here that the hero here is you, instead of saying the hero is who we’re trying to serve.” And there’s a subtle shift there, but it’s an important shift from a messaging standpoint to make.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well, I don’t think there’s anybody better to ask this question then, too, just with your marketing background and the fact that you’ve worked in nonprofit, for-profit, and now as an entrepreneur. But what is a practical piece of advice that you could give somebody who’s listening right now and they’re going, “Okay, I hear what you’re saying. I need to be more people focused. I need to do that, but how?” How do they change the messaging? What is a small tweak that they can do relatively soon, today, tomorrow, where they can start, their clients, or customers start to feel that they are who is important, not the business?

 

Jeff Henderson:

Great question, Lisa. And this is going to sound a little smart alecky. So I don’t mean it that way.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

We love smart alecks around here. You are welcome.

 

Jeff Henderson:

Really smart aleck is the word, but there’s another smart, and I would want to say that. I don’t mean it to be flippant, would probably be a better word.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Flippant, yeah.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Flippant is a good word, yeah.

 

Jeff Henderson:

But again, here’s what I tell leaders. If you want to serve people and be for them, here’s my question, do you genuinely like people? Are you genuinely and authentically for your customer, or are you just trying to get something out of them? At the end of the day, would you be willing, every now and then, to lose money to keep a client, just because it’s the right thing to do? It’s a heart test for leaders. Do you genuinely love people? There’s a great book that I’m reading right now, is called The Greatest Salesman in the World. Have you all read this book before?

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

No, I don’t think so.

 

Jeff Henderson:

It’s this book right here. It’s several years old. It’s the shortest book, and it’s the longest book. You have to actually… It has 10 habits in it, and you have to read the habits three times a day for 30 days before you go on with the next habit.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Wow, interesting.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Wow, Okay.

 

Jeff Henderson:

This is going to sound like a pastor talking about, but this is a business… Greatest Salesman in the World. It says, “I will greet each day would love in my heart.” Now I know we don’t like the word love in the business, but okay, hang with me. “I would greet each day with love in my heart for the people that I come in contact with.” And that’s why I love what Andy Stanley says. When he says, “Do for one, what you wish you could do for everyone.” If you do that 365 days a year, that’s 365 people every single day. And so practically speaking, I think there’s a heart check.

 

Jeff Henderson:

But for leaders specifically, and businesses specifically, I would give you a very practical marketing suggestion, and that is, most organizations forget the “social” in social media. They don’t do social media, they do digital media. So when I share this with particularly larger organizations, they Tricia, Lisa, they lose their minds. They’re like, “What do you say, we don’t? I could show you my Instagram page. I could show you our Facebook page.” And I’m like, “No, no, no, that’s digital media. What I’m saying is, you’ve got 89 comments here and you haven’t responded to a single one of them.”

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

 

Jeff Henderson:

So your customers are trying to talk to you and you’re not talking back. The reason is, is because you’ve set up systems that the organization is the most important entity. So you’re just pushing content out, which you need to push content out, you need to talk about your product, but there needs to be a balance. In those organizations that lift off their platform and go into their customer’s platform, and communicate with them there, they’re going to win.

 

Jeff Henderson:

That’s why smaller organizations can be more nimble and more effective on social media. That’s why, Gwinnett Church, a lot of people didn’t see our social media strategy because it was on other people’s platforms, because we were commenting.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Sure.

 

Jeff Henderson:

But when I left Gwinnett Church, one of the things that I heard from people is, “Thank you for making this church feels so small.” In other words, two campuses weren’t churches, but I would comment. I would comment to people. I would say, hey… And here’s something that organizations need to tell our customers, or people that are serving. You need to tell them, I see you, I hear you, and I believe in you. I see you, I hear you, and I believe in you, and ultimately, I am for you. So that’s one marketing strategy, Lisa, that don’t forget the “social” and social media.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, there’s an intimacy. How you talk about making what’s big feel very intimate and connected. Connection, especially nowadays, has become even more important to people as we are so disconnected. People are just craving that engagement and connection. So I totally see that. That’s an excellent, excellent point. I love that.

 

Jeff Henderson:

Exactly right. In fact, when COVID hit, when I was still in the church, I got everybody together and said, “All right, number one, here’s the good news, let’s just keep doing what we’re doing to be for our community.” But then I handed out phone numbers of everyone in our church that we had information on, and I said, “I want all of us to start picking up the phone and calling people.” And I said, “You’re not going to get them, you’re going to get their voicemail, but just say, Hey, from Gwinnett Church, just touching base, just want to let you know that we’re thinking of you today.” The feedback we got on this was unbelievable because people were saying, “Hey, I just can’t believe that you all would call me.” And it’s that trying to get, “Hey, I see you out there.” The mistake I made though, is I told our staff that nobody would answer their phone, but since no one had anything else to do, everybody was answering their phone.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

They were on the phone for hours and days, right?

 

Tricia Sciortino:

That’s a great problem to have. That’s a great problem to have.

 

Jeff Henderson:

And small touches are not small.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah, I love this. You’re just speaking to my heart. I love people. I love doing for people. And I really hope that most businesses, most leaders who are hearing this podcast today really take this to heart, and they switched their mindset, and they just really embrace their clients and their customers. Because, T, like you said, people just want to feel that connection. We were created for connection, right? That’s what the body was all about was, the church was for a connection, and I think that as people aren’t able to visit their family members and see their friends, that if they need to purchase something, then they want to know that you understand how they feel. And so, this is just really, really good stuff today. Good stuff. That’s the word of the day, good stuff.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes. Yes.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well, thank you so much, Jeff, for joining us today, this has been awesome. I took away a lot of nuggets and I know that our listeners will too, so I appreciate your time.

 

Jeff Henderson:

Yeah, I’m so honored to be here. I apologize for saying smart alecky. I don’t even know if that’s a word, so…

 

Tricia Sciortino:

It was probably better than the alternative that starts with an A, so we’re going to give you a pass.

 

Jeff Henderson:

But I’m a big fan of what you all are doing, and I hope to see you all again soon.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes. Thank you, Jeff.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Man, every time we see Jeff, he has just so many good nuggets to share. I just really enjoy spending time with him.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

He is so fun.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, for someone who says he’s not fun, I think he’s fun.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

I know, right?

 

Tricia Sciortino:

He’s like self-proclaimed un-fun.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

I you bet his wife and his kids would say just how fun he really is.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

I agree.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah, yeah. Well tell me, what did you take away from our conversation with Jeff today?

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, the thing that struck me the most was, identifying as an organization or a person, right? What you are known for, and then what you want to be known for, and really the gap that sits between those two places, and that the idea that every day you show up to work to close that gap. Is that who you are today, you’re working towards what you want to be known for as an organization and a business.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

So I think we’re all a work in progress. Organizations are a work in progress. And I just love how he really challenged our listeners and us to say, you show up every day to close that gap. So, I loved that.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. Yeah. I hadn’t really never heard it said that way before, but-

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, so much sense.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

I think that’s a unique way to say that.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, yeah. How about you?

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. For me, wrapping a whole bunch of stuff together as how he’s talked about, so many times larger businesses treat social media as just digital media, but remembering that your clients, and your customers, and your prospects want to know that you see them, you hear them, and you understand them.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, mega.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

It’s so important. I don’t think people understand the value of a happy client, how that tenfold adds value to your organization, how they become your marketing when people are talking. One of the things he said also, about being remarkable.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

How he broke that word up to be remark-able. You want to be an organization where your clients are able to remark what a great experience they’ve had with you, and then that bleeds into referrals.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

It’s such a smart way to look at a great ROI practical reason, of why doing good for your customers does good for your business.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right, yeah. You have to be remarkable. You have to give your clients something to talk about, right? And that also means, and this even goes back to Donald Miller’s StoryBrand, is you not being the hero either. You’ve got to put forth your client and your customer, and they have to be the center of attention. And that is the reason why you continue to do good, is so that they can be the center of attention and you not be that narcissist.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

I thought that was really good too, how he said, so many businesses on social media look like a bunch of narcissists, so…

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, yes, yeah. Well, and the focus on really treating people well, and how that replicates into your client base, right? So as leaders, we’re not on the frontline. I don’t have the opportunity to be talking and working with all of our clients, our team does. And so, that happy team, right, is engaging with the client. So, a happy team transfers into a great client experience, transfers into great clients who want to remark about how awesome you are, so…

 

Tricia Sciortino:

And that’s something I think we do really well at BELAY, is we’re super mindful about how we treat our team. They know that they’re important, and that they matter, and that translates. That’s great marketing also.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right, yeah. It’s pouring into your culture, which is another one of the things we love to talk about, so our topic, ding, ding ding.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well, I’m pretty sure we just recapped the whole conversation-

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Oh, we did.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Which means that we both really, really enjoyed it. So guys, you know what time it is, it is time for The One Next Step. As the most practical business podcast, we want to make sure that taking action is easy. So with each episode, we’re going to offer you one next step to propel you forward, and today’s next step is to download Jeff Henderson’s Know What Your For toolkit. It includes four resources to help you more intentionally communicate and demonstrate that you are for your customers, your team, your community, and yourself. You’ll get access to an organizational assessment to help you discover how effectively your team is being for others, and a weekly social media plan to help you regularly celebrate your customers and team. The other resources will help you navigate and improve how you show up as a leader. This toolkit will help you close the gap between who you want to be and who people believe you are, as both a person and an organization.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

That is a very robust download download. That’s a fabulous toolkit of goodies right there. So downloaded now, text the phrase “One Next Step” to 31996, or visit onenextsteppodcast.com.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Thank you so much for listening to this episode of One Next Step. We hope you’ve enjoyed what you’re hearing from us, and now we want to hear from you. So head on over to Apple Podcast, Spotify or wherever you listen, and leave us a review. We created this podcast to help you lead your team and grow your business, so we read every one of them.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Until next time, own your journey. It’s your life and your business. It’s up to you to create the life and organization you want. Join us next week for more practical tips and actionable tools to advance your business one step at a time. Start by making today count.

 

Speaker 3:

Thanks for listening to one next step. Be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or follow us on Spotify, then join us next time for more practical business tips and tools to help you get more done, grow your business, and lead your team with confidence. For more episodes, show notes, and helpful resources, visit onenextsteppodcast.com.

Download Jeff Henderson’s Know What You’re FOR Toolkit. Included are four resources that will assist you in more intentional communication and equip you with ways to demonstrate your dedication to your customers, your team, your community and yourself. You’ll get access to an organizational assessment that will help you discover how effective your team is performing FOR others, as well as a weekly social media plan to help you show consistent appreciation for your customers and team. This toolkit will help you close the gap between who you want to be and who people believe you are, both as a person and an organization

 

 

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Thank you for listening to One Next Step.

Don’t miss next week’s special episode when Ian Morgan Cron, from Enneagram fame, joins us for the first of a two-part feature on discussing the Enneagram at work. He wrote the best-selling book, The Road Back to You, and knows about personality types inside and out. Join us then when we’ll talk relationships, what motivates people, and the why behind what people do and how they think.