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About This Episode

Everything was different in 2020 as we all faced new and challenging hardships. Some goals shifted, some were thrown out the window, and some we were able to hang on to regardless of what was happening around us. However, no matter what 2021 looks like, we can try to find balance as we continue to lead our organizations and personal lives. 

 

If this new year continues to throw us curveballs, the great thing is, we are adaptable. With an initial plan, we just need to reevaluate and adjust when things don’t go according to that plan. So join us as we talk about focusing on your professional and personal goals.

 

Your One Next Step

Download this episode’s activation guide, which is our Goal Setting worksheet. It will help you create and organize your personal and professional goals so that you can succeed at work and life.

 

Download Now

 

In each episode, we highlight one next step for you and provide an activation or delegation guide to help you immediately take action, start applying what you learn, and get your team to help you.

1. Know yourself.

One of the biggest aspects of goal setting is simply knowing yourself and where you want to go. This may be more difficult than it sounds. But the point is that you can’t possibly make yourself better through goal setting, personally or professionally, without having some idea of who you are, what you truly want, and the why behind all of it. Are these truly your goals? Or are they ideas that have been pushed on you by others – a parent, a spouse, or someone else who might have misjudged your desires. Working through these issues will help you make more sound, reasonable goals that truly represent what you want.

2. It’s okay to advocate for yourself.

You matter. And choosing to make yourself a better person is absolutely a worthy cause. Don’t get caught up in some type of self-guilt that says you’re being selfish or inconsiderate by having your own set of hopes and dreams. You can look out for others while you work on your own goals – it isn’t an either/or situation. 

3. Don’t overdo it.

One of the worst things you can do when goal setting is to shoot too high and too far. Take it easy, especially when starting out. Consider possibly just making one or two goals in each area of your life. And make sure your goals are attainable! You want them to be specific, measurable, written down, achievable and with a time limit. These are the keys to good goal setting. 

Keeping the guidelines mentioned in this episode in mind, what are some of your personal and professional goals for 2021?
How would you describe your history with goal setting? Where have you performed well and where have you struggled?
Do you have one long-term, possibly “far-fetched,” goal that you’ve never shared before? Would telling it to others give you more motivation and possibly make it more real?

A better you is better for everybody around you.

Tricia Sciortino

The first challenge in setting your goals is knowing who you are and where you want to go.

Lisa Zeeveld

It's not selfish to want things for you.

Tricia Sciortino

Your vision and values should be the litmus test that helps to guide your goals.

Lisa Zeeveld

Don’t set yourself up for failure by creating unattainable goals. Keep them short and sweet.

Tricia Sciortino

(04:42) What are some of the challenges LZ has faced when setting personal and professional goals?

(06:45) The problem with living the hopes and dreams of someone else. 

(8:00) It’s okay to advocate for yourself. 

(8:55) How to find time for yourself when you’re busy with business. 

(11:48) Is it a misperception that you can have perfect balance in your personal and professional life?

(14:10) Don’t overdo it when starting out with goal setting. 

(17:05) Determining your core values as an individual before you set goals is extremely helpful. 

(18:14) The worst thing you can do when setting goals is setting a personal goal that is unattainable. Start reasonably. 

(18:53) What are some examples of personal goals, and what are the tactics used to meet them?

(24:24) Key aspects of goal setting (measurable, time limit, specific, written down, etc.)

(27:45) This week’s one next step: Download this episode’s activation guide, which is our Goal Setting worksheet. It will help you create and organize your personal and professional goals so that you can succeed at work and life.

Tricia Sciortino:

Guess what guys? I wrote a new book that’s coming out later this month. Rise Up and Lead Well: How Leveraging an Assistant Will Change Your Life and Maximize Your Time. An assistant is the secret weapon you need to level up your leadership in the new year. Someone should be in your corner, managing the details so you stay focused on the priorities. I’ve spent more than a decade at BELAY, a virtual assistant company, and I’ve led VAs, trained them, and even worked as one early in my career. I’ve seen all sides and know the secrets for success. Use my new book to get a clear plan for how to effectively use an assistant. This isn’t fluff, or theory, or inspiration. It’s battle-tested tactics that really work. Find it on Amazon on January 26.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

So many business leaders invest so much time, energy, and effort into their careers, but, at the end of the day, it’s one segment of who we are as individuals. That we are mothers and brothers and sisters and mentors and teachers and members of communities, and we don’t spend as much time really investing in, “What are my goals there?”

 

Speaker 3:

Welcome to One Next Step, the most practical business podcast in the world, helping you get more done, grow your business, and lead your team with confidence, with tips and tools you didn’t get in business school. Here are your hosts, Tricia Sciortino and Lisa Zeeveld.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Welcome to One Next Step, the practical business podcast that helps you run your business and make it stop running you, so you can enjoy your work and your life. I’m Tricia Sciortino, the CEO of BELAY.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

And hey, I’m Lisa Zeeveld, the COO of BELAY. Together, we are T&LZ. We’ve known each other since 2005 and have worked together for a decade, growing a 100% remote business from startup, to being recognized on the Inc 5000 fastest growing list of companies for six years running.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

LZ and I have learned a lot along the way, and we have made some great friends. For One Next Step, we are inviting them on the podcast to bring you episodes filled with excellent content delivered by some talented people. But today, LZ and I are going to be talking about how to set personal goals as a leader. So often we are really good about setting goals for our careers, but we do not do a great job stopping and pausing to set goals for ourselves as whole people. So, I’m really excited to talk about setting goals personally, so that you can achieve things in your entire life, not always just your work life.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Totally. Too often this leads to lives that are just driven by business, rather than values, and that’s just like a personal mantra of mine. Right? I just don’t want to succeed only in business. I want to have a great personal life too. And so, you really do have to have both of those. We want you to win in your organization and in your personal life, but in order to win, you must find balance. Too much of anything is never a good thing. Just as your business would fail if you only focused on your hobbies, your personal life will suffer if you put all your effort just into the organization alone. So, today, we want to help you set goals for not only your business, but for you personally. We want you to stay focused on what truly matters to you.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes. This is such a relevant topic as we start our new year and reflect back on what was 2020. And the new year is always a great time to think through what we want differently for ourselves. It’s a great reflection point for us, to really stop for a minute and say, “What do I want for myself holistically?” and not get out of balance and focus too much on one thing or another. I think it’s very easy, and people do a great job at setting goals for themselves when it comes to business and work. There’s metrics they want to achieve. And as good businesses and business leaders, we set up KPIs for ourselves and our teams and all of those things, but we forget that we are a whole person. And so, 2020 definitely threw us some curve balls, and I think one thing we learned in 2020 is that we are adaptable, our goals can be adaptable, and we can restart. And now’s a perfect time to restart, thinking and focusing on goals for you as a whole person professionally and personally.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

So, as we talk about this topic, LZ, I’d love to know… and you’re a master goal setter, so this is going to be a great conversation. What have been some of the challenges maybe early on, maybe when you first started setting goals, but that you have faced setting personal and professional goals?

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. Yeah, like you said, I love to talk about this because it’s been so relevant in my own life. I did not grow up in an environment where goals were talked about very frequently. I didn’t grow up in an environment where people had great hopes for me and those types of things, and so I really looked for examples outside of my own community and my own family. And so, I think that, really, the challenge at first was even to know what goals I wanted and what I wanted for me, outside of what I was all ready seeing around me. And so, it was focusing on people that I thought were successful or that had things that I wanted. And I really take all my mentees through this when I have a mentorship, is really helping people understand themselves and really where they want to go. So, I think that the challenge, first, is knowing who you are, and knowing where you want to go.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Right? I think it’s surprising. You could ask so many people, you ask them like, “What is it they want for themselves? What would be the end result if you had a bunch of goals?” Forget the goals, but what do you want for yourself that’s not what you have today? And most people don’t have any idea.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

No they don’t.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

… they don’t respond, “Oh, I want to grow this,” or, “I want to be a better this,” or, “I want to run a marathon”. Most people that we run into, and we do programs even here at BELAY where we work with aspiring leaders, there are a good amount of people who have never really taken the time to sit down and think, “I actually don’t know. Let me put pen to paper and determined who am I, and what actually do I want for myself?”

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right. Because either, number one, they don’t know because they live in a community where they can’t actually dream of a better life and better circumstances than where they’re in, or, I’ve even encountered this too, they are living the hopes and dreams of somebody else.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Somebody else’s goals.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right. Right. So, perhaps it’s a family member, maybe a parent didn’t have the same opportunities, and so they’re pushing their own goals on them. Or, I mean, it’s just really not who they want to be at their core. So, I think it’s really, really important to know who you are, first and foremost, and know where you want to go, and it truly be yours. Because if you decide that, or if you’ve been told that you need to be a dentist because your dad was a dentist, or that you need to take over the family business, and that’s not really where your heart is, you’re never actually going to be successful no matter how many goals and KPIs that you put in place.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

So, I really think that the challenge to start out, that I have talked with people, is really understanding who they are and where they want to go, and spending time and reflection. It is going to be painful. This is normally not one of those things that’s easy for folks to do because you need to probably go back to your childhood and look at some of your relationships, and really dive into where you are today and where you want it to dream. Be allowed to dream.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes. Well, and I think a lot of people also don’t realize that it’s okay and you should advocate for yourself, and it’s actually okay. It’s not selfish to want things for you. And I think there’s a lot of people who just live life day to day to day, drifting to whatever comes their way, haphazardly, and don’t set goals and things in place because they think that it would be selfish to have a dream or to focus on something that was for them. And so, I feel like, gosh, if somebody could hear this and walk away and say, “No, I matter. I do have goals and dreams, and I’m going to put pen to paper and I’m going to start aspiring and driving towards things I actually want.” And it’s not selfish. A better you is better for everybody around you.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Totally. Yes. Yes. And especially when we talk about personal and professional. Right? Like you have your company goals. I think so often one of the challenges can be how to find time for yourself because you’re so focused on your business. And one of the things, I was relating a story to a colleague, is when I had my very first professional job, and in my mind, having limited resources and where my background came from, I just saw people who had very fancy titles and who drove fancy cars and what I related as to having more resources and more money. And I thought they had it all. And what I saw… I mean, this is, gosh, I was 19 years old. Right? But so many of them, with those big fancy titles, had really bad marriages.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Or like miserable lives.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Right? Like money doesn’t buy happiness.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Totally miserable… Right. Yeah. I’m really so thankful that I had that experience so young because that was really the catalyst for me to decide that I didn’t want to put all my eggs in one basket. I didn’t want to focus on one and let the other one go by the wayside. And so I think that that is the other challenge, is knowing that your personal goals can be tied to the goals of your organization or your particular job or your role, but not giving up and not putting the effort into your own personal goals. I mean, for me, I mean, it could be something as silly as learning an extra language or taking a vacation with my family. I mean, I’ve put goals on there about material things that I wanted to buy. It’s whatever keeps the forward momentum.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, yes. No, I love that. And I think that so many business leaders invest so much time, energy, and effort into their careers, but, at the end of the day, it’s one segment of who we are as individuals, that we are mothers and brothers and sisters and mentors and teachers and members of communities. And we don’t spend as much time really investing in, “Well, what are my goals there? How am I a better mentor? How am I a better mother? What are the things that I can put in place or practice I can put in place so that I’m balanced, so I’m not only focused on my professional development, but I’m also focused on my personal development?” So, I think today’s conversation, really with the hope that really giving yourself a chance to succeed in all areas of your life, is really reflecting on what are the things that you can put in place that help you grow as an entire person, and not only at work? And if we learned one thing in 2020, it’s that at any time work could change or be gone.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right. Totally.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Right? I mean, anything could happen at any time, and a business could shut down, something could happen, jobs can be lost. So, putting your entire livelihood into that one basket is risky.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. So, do you think it’s a misnomer that you can have perfect balance in both your professional and your personal goals? I mean, how do you see that? Have you been able to find a way to have balance in both of those? Or do you feel like it’s always this push and pull between the two?

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. I think you can. For me, it’s very seasonal. So, there are times when, and I think a lot of businesses are this way, where you may spend more time at work because it’s end of year or seasonally your business may require more of you as a leader because of what it is you do for a living. But I also think that there’s the balance of when that’s not the case, where you are able to invest more into your personal life and family and life. At the end of the day, I am a big fan of, and I talk about separately, ideal work week and monitoring my time. I never want to be so entrenched in one area over the other. I do believe you can have a great career where you’re investing and putting in the time, energy, and effort you should to be successful and grow, while also spending time, energy, and effort on the other things: family life, community, and friendships, and that you can do all the things. It just requires a lot of boundary creating, planning, a lot of planning. It’s very easy-

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Intentionality.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes. It’s very easy to like, “Oh, I forgot to set up my date night,” or, “Oh, I…” It’s easy to stray if you don’t have a plan.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

I think that’s a great point that there’s some seasonality to where your focus goes and obviously where your goals fit in. And I think that’s probably something that a lot of our listeners may not have even thought of, is that maybe it’s January, February, and they’re looking to create some goals, but realizing that the goals are supposed to take X amount of time. They get to set the timeframe by which to complete them, and so you may be really focused on your personal goals, maybe in June and July, because your business also has some seasonality and so you have more free time, but that you’re not a failure if you’re not working on them in February and March, when it’s a high time in your business. So, I hope that we focus on that.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Right. Yeah. And what I’ve seen, too, is when people first start out, maybe their first year going through a goal setting exercise, okay, they sit down and they decide, “Okay, I’m going to have goals for all of my life. A couple of work goals, a couple of spousal goals, a couple of family goals, some financial goals, some goals for my kids.” And the next thing you know, they have 27 goals that they’re, by the way, all starting on January one.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

And they’re done in 12 months.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Right. And you see utter failure and disappointment because there is no way you can have 27 goals you’re starting on January 1st, and you’re not going to… Come March, you’re going to throw your hands up in the air because you’re going to feel like you got nowhere with everything. So, I think part of goal setting is really keep them short and sweet. I like to say, try to have no more than 10 goals. Let them be well-rounded. They could be professional and financial. One in maybe each area of your life. Less than that would even be awesome. And be mindful of when each start. You may have a goal set that’s personal to your point that doesn’t start till May. So, you’re maybe planning out your entire year, but they’re not all starting at the same time.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right. Yes. Completely. So, I’ve seen failure there, where people have really overwhelmed themselves and gave up.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

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Lisa Zeeveld:

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Lisa Zeeveld:

One of the things that too was really helpful for me when I started down this road is that I took time to find out what my core values were as an individual. If you are a business leader, it’s probably something that you think of quite often is your mission or your vision and your values for your business. And you use them as a litmus test to your prospects and to your employees and how you create the business. And really, I transform that into my own personal life. And so, when you’re talking about limiting what your goals are, I use my values as the header to what goals I’m going to create each year. So, it limits me because, as an Enneagram one, I want to everything and do everything, and I want to grow by leaps and bounds, but I can’t do it all. And so, putting some parameters around what your goals are, I think, is very, very helpful, because they need to be bite-sized.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

If you have a big goal, we also talk about breaking it down. So, if you’re going to tackle something in June and July, can you do that? What are you going to do every day or every week to make it really feasible so you can win? Because the worst thing that you can do about creating personal goals, just like in your business, is to create a goal that’s unattainable. Nothing is going to create chaos in your life and truly your own disapproval and wreck what you really believe of yourself is not accomplishing a goal. And we don’t want to set you up for failure.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Oh God, yes, exactly. Then you wind up in a worse place than where you started, even. Yeah. Because failure could be a setback when it comes to goal setting, so you got to take it easier on yourself and start reasonably. I think that’s a great piece of advice. I would love if you would share… I don’t know. And maybe you have a little bit. What are some examples of personal goals? And then let’s talk a little bit about the actual tacticalness of the goal themselves.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. I mean, like I said before, to me, I have a goal to grow by a certain percentage each year. So, I talked about I have my own vision statement, I have my own core values, and so I know where I want to be at the end of the year. And so, then I take those core values, I’m going a little tactical here, but then I create my goal. So, for me, some of the things may sound silly to other people, but they’re just things I want out of life.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

And so, particularly this year, this is 2021, my family is one of my core values, and so travel’s really important to us. And it’s going to be really hard this year to travel, just like it was in 2020, but I put down there what trips that I want to take with my family. And I currently have a student that is in college and one that’s in high school, and that’s a different dynamic because now I don’t control their schedules anymore, especially my college student, because his spring break is different than my high school student’s break, and he’s got his own life, which I’m super excited about him creating. And my daughter’s starting to build hers.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

And so, now more than ever, I look at those opportunities for all four of us to be in one place as a real gift. And so, that continues to be a goal of mine, is we take two week-long vacations, just a couple of quick trips. I mean, from the outside looking in, they may not seem that exciting, but again, it’s all of us at the same point at the same time, doing all the things that we love to do and making memories. And still today, my kids talk about, when they were smaller and we could get one hotel room and two queen beds, and they sleep in the same bed and we’d all four be sharing the same bathroom. The great memories.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Long gone are those days.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

It is.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

I pulled one of those over the holidays and looked over at my husband towards the tail end of our vacation and go, “I’m pretty sure this is the last time we all stay in one hotel room.”

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Oh, totally. Yeah. Yeah.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Everybody’s too grown, there’s one bathroom. We’ve moved on from that.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

And you have two girls, so bless your husband’s heart. Right?

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Poor Paul.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

There’s a lot of estrogen in the room, and he barely got bathroom dives.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, yes. Yeah, I love that.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

And then something silly is there’s a certain hand bag that I want that I put in there. So, I mean, that’s just a high level. But how about you? I mean, what are some of your personal goals? Whatever you’re comfortable sharing.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. Yeah. So, similarly, I usually set, I have some kind of personal financial goals, I want to save a certain amount. I have a daughter who’s in high school who’ll be going to college next year, so I have goals around two-part. One is financially making sure we’re set for college, and then the other part is her senior year, through this remote work, pandemic, non-senior year, really around having special moments with her through this year that she won’t get. So, specifically, one of them is we’re going to take a graduation vacation because there won’t be a graduation. So, that to me is a goal that I want to have that time with her, mother/daughter time, graduation celebration. So, that’s a personal goal.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Another one is my husband and I have have date nights, so we have two date nights a month. And I also have a goal for once a month to have social goals. So, we go out with other couples and things like that, which can sometimes be limited, depending on who’s comfortable going out and who’s not and restaurants and seating and all the things. So, it really requires planning. Unfortunately the day and age we’re in, that we actually have to plan a couple dates and what restaurants we can go to or what we can do with other people. So, that’s actually a goal, is to remember to be social in a season where it’s hard to be social.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. I love that. I love that. You and I talk about this a lot, but I think for some of our listeners, we are so intentional here in our business life that it really does roll over into our personal life. And so, I find that when I’m talking to people who are maybe not as intentional and haven’t created those goals, they wonder how we get so much done. Right? But we’ve literally planned all of our vacations.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. My entire PTO calendar for the month of 2021 is all ready locked and loaded.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right. Yes.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. Right.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

And so, I think that’s the other point, too, is in the same way that you do with your business goals by saying, “Hey, these are the meetings that we’re going to have. This is the cadence we’re going to have them,” and you get them on the calendar, like you have deadlines. It’s like with your personal goals, it’s also having deadlines. So, people ask how do you accomplish so much? Well, because it’s on my calendar. And I love the reminders. So, I have reminders that pop up on my phone all the time, like, “Hey, did you read tonight?” And so, that is really how you start to create this very dynamic, purposeful, personal life, just like you do within your own organization.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Oh, yes. It’s like having important birth dates and dates and reminders to send birthday cards or whatnot is equally as important as reminders for some report that’s due at work. It’s all considered the same thing. So, I love… In summary, right? If you’re goal setting, to make sure you set goals that are achievable and measurable, like you can actually say, “Check, done.” You don’t want something that’s too wishy-washy or too vague, like, “I want to be a better swimmer.” How? So, think about what’s measurable, have a time limit or a deadline, and consider the timing of it all when things should stop and start or how long things should take you. And make sure there’s spacing all in there.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

And then, also, like we talked about, reflecting and making sure they’re actually things that are motivating and personal. They are literally the things that you want. It’s not for somebody else. It’s for you. And then most importantly, write it down. Whether it’s a piece of paper, a Google doc, a pad, I mean, whatever that looks like for you, write them down, and then check in with yourself. I mean, the most important thing is you can write all these great things down on a piece of paper, but what’s your accountability plan? What’s your rolling plan?

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. That’s what I was going to say. Yeah.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Find an accountability partner. And some of it may seem silly, so you got to find someone you trust. Like for me, my silly handbag or whatever, but the accountability is where I think some people fail.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. You got to share them with somebody. Somebody has got to know you have these goals. My husband’s not surprised that I have a goal that we’re going on date night twice a month, so he’s very well aware. It’s happening. So, sharing it, accountability, and follow up. Check in with yourself maybe quarterly, just like you would at work. Quarterly sit down and go, “Where am I at with my personal goals? Darn, I didn’t take that vacation, or I didn’t spend that time with my daughter. I need to course correct.” Hold yourself accountable. Plan the time. Put it on your calendar, and say, “This day, at the beginning of this quarter, I must sit down with myself, and we’re going to have a conversation about where we’re at.”

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s right. Yeah. And I always tell people, too, that personal goals… There’s an old statement, I’m probably going to get it wrong here. If I get it wrong, y’all email me and tell me, but all work and no play makes Jane a very dull girl. Right? And so, that’s really what I keep in mind, I want to be able to go out to dinner with my husband or my friends, and I want to be able to hold a good conversation and not talk about work. Right? I want to be able to share things.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

I did not work for a season of time, I was full-time mom, and it was even important for me then, because when I went out on date nights with my husband, I didn’t want to just talk about the kids. I wanted to have things that were actually, we could leave them at home, not talk about them. And the same thing with your friends. Your friends don’t want to hear just about your business. They want to know what trip you took, if you’ve learned a new hobby. And it’s another great way to meet people, too, because, to your point, if you’re adding something in there, you’re definitely going to meet more people. And you’ll just be a better person all around.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes. Yes. So, you got it, guys. All you listeners out there, today’s the day. Go get that pad and paper, set yourself some personal goals.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

It is time for the One Next Step. As the most practical business podcast, we want to make sure taking action is easy. So, with each episode, we’re going to offer you One Next Step to propel you forward. Today’s next step is to download our goal-setting worksheet. It will help you create and organize your personal and professional goals so that you can succeed at work and life.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, both of them. Download it now. To download it, text the phrase, “One Next Step,” to 31996, or visit onenextsteppodcast.com. When you request today’s guide, you’ll also receive a summary of today’s episode, which includes key quotes, takeaways, and links to resources.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Hey guys, thanks so much for listening to this episode of One Next Step. We hope you enjoyed what you are hearing from us. And now, we want to hear from you. Head on over to Apple Podcast, Spotify, or wherever you listen to your favorite podcast, and leave us a review.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Until next time, own your journey. It’s your life and your business. It’s up to you to create the life and organization you want. Join us next week for more practical tips and actionable tools to advance your business one step at a time.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Start by making today count.

 

Speaker 3:

Thanks for listening to One Next Step. Be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or follow us on Spotify. Then, join us next time for more practical business tips and tools to help you get more done, grow your business, and lead your team with confidence. For more episodes, show notes, and helpful resources, visit onenextsteppodcast.com.

Download this episode’s activation guide, which is our Goal Setting worksheet. It will help you create and organize your personal and professional goals so that you can succeed at work and life.

 

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In each episode, we highlight one next step for you and provide an activation or delegation guide to help you immediately take action, start applying what you learn, and get your team to help you.

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To get practical business tips and tools delivered to you each week, subscribe to the podcast via email here or on your favorite podcast platform (which we’ve listed below).  It’s like DVR for podcasts.

 

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Join Us Next Week

Thank you for listening to One Next Step.

Join us next week when we’ll talk about how learning to leverage your assistant in more effective ways can help you better lead your organization. Lisa and Tricia’s own executive assistants, Kate Sawtelle and Melissa Lawrence, will join the conversation to help us unpack the ways their support has made all the difference to the way we lead.