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About This Episode

We want you to win in your organization. In order to win, you must work well with others who don’t think or process the way you do. And whether you are working from home or back in an office setting, the key is putting forth the effort to learn how to work better together, even if that is using helpful resources like the Enneagram. 

 

It’s a challenging time with many organizations working remotely, which brings another challenging layer to team connectedness and understanding. In this episode, we’ll dive into a  discussion on how we learned to use our differences to our advantage.

 

Your One Next Step

Download this episode’s activation guide, our Personality Assessment Cheat Sheet. We rounded up all of the personality assessments we use at BELAY and where you can find them. Collectively, they can help you discover how you interpret the world, manage your emotions, and show up to others around you. And, if everyone on your team shares their findings, you’ll be on your way to leveraging your differences to better the organization.

 

Download Now

 

In each episode, we highlight one next step for you and provide an activation or delegation guide to help you immediately take action, start applying what you learn, and get your team to help you.

1. Know Yourself.

The first step to working better with others is to simply know who you are. Know your strengths and weaknesses, what sets you off and energizes you, and how these traits come out when you are communicating with other people. A great place to start is one of the many personality tests out there. We love the Enneagram, but you could also consider the DISC or Myers Briggs personality tests. When you know yourself, you’re more equipped to be authentic and get to know others, which ultimately leads to better communication and an easier time working together.

2. Don’t let your personality profiles become labels and excuses.

For instance, if you’re a high D on the DISC, you don’t want to be known as the high-energy person who never listens to others and has a “bull in a china shop” mentality. At the same time, saying “that’s just the way I am” does nothing to help you grow or improve your relationship with others. Use these tests as a starting point to build from – a way to improve yourself as a leader and better understanding those you work with – instead of an excuse for bad behavior.

3. The best leaders/team members have aligned their personality style with their jobs.

Everyone should want to work in a position that aligns with their natural strength. That’s why most accountants are high Cs or maybe 1s on the Enneagram. When you’re following your natural strengths, instead of working in the tension of your weaknesses, you’re more energized, more productive, and a better leader.

Have you taken any personality tests? Talk about what the results were and what you learned. 
Without naming names, what are some examples of times when, no matter how hard you tried, you simply couldn’t get along with a co-worker. What was the core issue on both sides, and how did the situation end? Would you do anything differently?
Does your current job fit your personality style? Why or why not?
What is the best way to avoid taking feedback personally?

To successfully leverage your differences, you have to first know yourself.

Tricia Sciortino

At the heart of every great relationship is compromise.

Lisa Zeeveld

Every leader needs to have a healthy amount of humility.

Lisa Zeeveld

Don’t let your differences become an excuse, use them as an opportunity for growth.

Tricia Sciortino

Your weaknesses may never become your strengths, but you can always strive to have a few less weaknesses.

Tricia Sciortino

(05:14) Tricia and LZ talk about their Enneagram profiles. 

(07:03) The more you know about someone, the more you’ll be able to understand their point of view. 

(8:24) How do you lean into differences that you might view as challenges?

(12:48) The most important first thing you can do on this subject is simply know yourself. 

(14:20) People tend to allow personality and communication differences to hurt their relationship too often. 

(15:57) To truly be emotionally intelligent, we need to know ourselves, know the other’s motives, and find the middle ground in between. 

(17:20) Nobody wants to work for a “boss.” They want to follow leaders who inspire them. 

(18:19) Don’t allow your personality profiles to become labels (“that’s just the way they are!”), which can lead to the labels becoming an excuse for bad behavior.

(21:00) At the heart of every great relationship is compromise.

(22:50) Make sure your personality style aligns with what you do and your objectives. 

(25:59) Practical step to take: Find out about yourself (take personality tests like Enneagram, DISC, Myers Briggs) and do the same for your team and peers. Once you know each other better, you can easily spot the tension and build a bridge. 

(27:08) Don’t take feedback personally.

(28:43) This episode’s One Next Step: Download this episode’s activation guide, our Personality Assessment Cheat Sheet. We rounded up all of the personality assessments we use at BELAY, share why we use them and share where you can find them.

Tricia Sciortino:

If you let the communication differences become a wedge between you and other people, it can become unrecoverable for a lot of people, very tense. I think the best thing we can do to be true, emotionally intelligent adults.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Is to really know yourself, know the other’s motives and then find the middle ground in between.

 

Speaker 3:

Welcome to One Next Step, the most practical business podcast in the world, helping you get more done, grow your business and lead your team with competence with tips and tools you didn’t get in business school. Here are your hosts, Tricia Sciortino and Lisa’s Zeeveld.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Welcome to One Next Step. The practical business podcast that helps you run your business and make it stop running you so you can enjoy your work and your life. I’m Tricia Sciortino, the CEO of BELAY.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Hey, I’m Lisa Zeeveld, the COO of BELAY. Together, we are T and LZ. We’ve known each other since 2005 and have worked together for a decade growing a 100% remote business from startup to now being recognized on the Inc 5,000 Fastest Growing List for six years running.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, LZ and I have learned a lot along the way, and we have made some great friends and partners. For One Next Step, we are cashing in some favors to bring you episodes filled with excellent content delivered by some talented people. And we may have a thing or two to add ourselves. One Next Step is here to help you on your leadership journey.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Each week we release a new episode, answering your questions about running an organization. We will always highlight One Next Step for you to take immediate action and include an activation guide that reinforces what you’ve heard.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Welcome. In today’s episode, we’re going to explore how we use our differences to work better together. How we have practically used various tools, including the Enneagram on things like decision-making conflict resolution and team communication. Now more than ever as organizations are working remotely, teams need to come together and work to understand their coworkers and employees. Today, we will share with you our own case study and dig into real-life experiences.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes. Now, this might surprise some folks, but my thought processes do not always align with how Tricia processes information. I know, right?

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Shocking.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Shocking. We had to learn how to work together if we wanted our work to be successful and impactful. By using various tools, it has allowed us to overcome challenges, support each other’s strengths and help each other in our weaknesses. If teams can get to that place with each other, they will have a recipe for success. That’s an asset you can’t put a price tag on.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

We want to let you know that One Next Step is brought to you by BELAY’s Social Media Strategists Service. While social media is great for business, we know it’s a lot to manage. Most small business owners don’t know what to do or how to use social media, so they don’t even try. Are you unsure of which articles to share, what to retweet or how to schedule that video? Do you feel like you don’t quite know or understand how to speak to your audience? Are you daunted by learning the ins and outs of a new or any social media channel?

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

And even if you’re trying to get into the game, managing your social channels, promptly responding to comments and messages and tackling scheduling takes time. And well that may be time that you don’t have to spare, you can make the most of your social media presence. And that’s where we can help.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Every social media specialist boasts the BELAY vetted expertise that we’ve provided to thousands of entrepreneurs and executives for the last 10 years. With a social media strategist, you can stay ahead of your competition and make lasting connections with your community and your target audience. For more information, visit BelaySolutions.com.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

We want you to win in your organization. In order to win, you must work well with others who don’t think or process the way you do. As we said earlier, many organizations are working remotely, and that brings another set of challenges to team connectedness and understanding.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Absolutely. And this topic is so relevant right now, but whether you are working from home or back in an office setting, the key is putting forth the effort to learn how to work better together, even if that is using helpful resources like the Enneagram. Let’s dive in today and discuss how we learned to use our differences to our advantage. I’ll get started. Okay, LZ?

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Okay. Sounds good.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Like LZ mentioned a moment ago, we have very different thought processes. We tease each other and say, “We are the yin and the yang to each other’s leadership as partners over here at BELAY.”

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

I’m the Anna to the Elsa.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes. The Thelma to the Louise.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s right.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Whatever it is. And it has been a journey. And so to use Enneagram as a relevant benchmarker and to set the stage, I am an Enneagram eight, which is a protector, very expressive, a little bit overly direct, and I have the urge to act swiftly as an eight. Now, you, LZ are a one, which is a perfectionist.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

So we have some commonalities and some very big differences in that.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Totally. Yeah. As a one, I am labeled the perfectionist and so I can sometimes get lost in the details because I’m really worried about making everything just right. I also believe in injustice and all those things. And it’s interesting because what I have found out doing more research on the Enneagram is that the ones, the perfectionist tend to suppress their anger and their impulses because again, we want to seem perfect, so it kind of makes sense. But sometimes when we finally do get angry and that spills out, it comes out as righteousness, which is not very good. That’s not how I want people to remember me. The cool thing about an eight and a one though, the perfectionist and the protectors are that we are concerned with being right and justice and truth and fairness. And I think that that’s really where we’re able to come together in our differences and be such a great partnership.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. Because at the end of the day, we both believe in what’s fair. And I think if we could use that as our level set place that we make our decisions from together, we have found that that has been the thing that has worked in our favor. And then, really the more we know about each other. The more we’ve been able to understand the other person’s point of view and then be able to cohesively work together with less and less challenges over the years. To be honest, if we go back to when we first started to work together, when we were maybe less educated on how we each showed up, maybe we hadn’t taken many personality tests, we just knew we were who we were, who we were. We did have some struggles. We had some challenging times where we were coming from very different perspectives and we had a hard time aligning.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

I think part of that too, was emotional intelligence. We both have our way of communicating when we’re frustrated. Again, you’re going to say it, you’re going to come out and be more direct and I’m going to kind of hold onto that. In the beginning, like you said before, we actually had these numbers to help us understand we would butt heads and there was a time when even Brian and Shannon were like, “Y’all better figure this out.” Not in a way that I think was ever disrespectful. I’m going to speak for myself. I don’t feel like it was ever disrespectful, but there was some tension there because we were both driven and we were both passionate. And I could remember both of us saying, “Listen, we want the same thing. We are both hugely passionate about Belay and we want it to be successful. So we’re going to have to figure this out.”

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes. And how do we lean into our differences, which is kind of the point of this podcast today is how do we lean into those differences that used to be a challenge?

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

In the beginning, they really were a challenge for us because for example, I’m very direct and I’m very expressive. I can be very to the point. So sometimes I can come across as blunt or short or curt, or some people would even dare say, rude. How dare they, but rude is a word I have heard. So, really that is never my intention. I’m just wired in a way that that’s how I communicate. And so knowing that about myself, I have really kind of filtered or really worked on my communication style to say, “Some people actually receive me very well and that’s comfortable for them, and some people do not.” And me knowing the difference and knowing myself enough to know, “Okay, some people do receive that as curt and rude, and I need to know who those people are, and I need to think through how I communicate differently to the subset of people.” I mean, that is my job as the leader is to make sure that my communication style is meshing with everybody else’s communication style without losing myself either.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

And I think you, over the years have really, as our relationship has deepened, as we worked so closely together really understood once you knew my heart and you knew my intention was never to be curt, rude, all those things. You were just so accepting of it all, because you could run it through the filter, even though that’s not how you would have said it or not how you would have done it. You were able to kind of run it through that lens and say, “She has all the great intentions in the world, I know what she means.”

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

And it was no longer a thing.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Oh, completely. And likewise, because I really value deep relationships and I value social settings. I’m going to come across and really find a way to say it. I’m not as direct, maybe that’s just the easiest way to say it. I will use a lot of words to say something where you won’t. And so in the beginning I would frustrate you because you wanted action immediately. And I’m like, “No, I’m massaging the situation here.” I will get there, but this is the way that I want to do it. And because I want to do it perfectly, I’m going to sit there and think through every single word and be intentional about the words that I use. But you thought I was slow, because you’re like, “Why aren’t you moving faster? And why do you have to say all these words that make people feel good? Just get to the point.”

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

And so the funny thing is, like you said, that you’ve learned to understand how people take you. I’ve learned that too many words can be a lot for most people and that I value you as a leader and my friend. And so I’ve learned to be way more direct, not just with you, but in leading as well. I think that’s really where I’ve leaned into you to make my leadership style better is I don’t know that I rush anymore, but I’ve learned to speed up my thought process. And I take the words that I really want to say, and I cut them in half and then move forward from there.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

And then I turn the words I want to say and I double them.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

My emails are a little longer, yours are a little shorter and we’ve kind of figured out how to meet in the middle.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

And now that we know that about each other, it’s kind of a joke that we have with each other.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Because I know you love social interaction. You are a naturally gifted storyteller. You have so many experiences you recall and speak into, and that is not my gifting and not my place. So we kind of tease each other about, you have a story and Tricia’s not going to want to hear it or you can tell your story, but you’re just going to make it a little shorter than you might have before.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

But at the end of the day, we have just figured out how to really understand each other and meet in the middle. And I think that’s the message we kind of want for all of you out there is first and foremost, know yourself.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

 

Tricia Sciortino:

It has been because I know these things about myself and I know the things about you. It has helped us have a more cohesive, successful working relationship because now we can leverage what we know about each other, strengths and weaknesses alike and together make better holistic solutions and decisions.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah, I think if you’ve got a team member out there that you’re struggling with, and maybe it’s not a direct report, maybe it’s like Tricia and I, where you’re literally somebody that it’s a peer and you have to work with. I think one of the best things we ever did is it was just me and you. And we’re like, “Listen, I don’t want your job. You don’t want my job. We’ve got to figure out how to work together and really understand each other.” And having that really clear communication and a foundation built on trust. Like you said, I know without a shadow of a doubt that you have my best interest in mind. And so when you come to me to give me feedback, because now you’re my boss,

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Boss lady in the house.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s right. When you come to me for feedback, or we’re working on a project together that really impacts the whole company, your directness, or your desires for the business, I know are coming from the absolute best place. I’m not thinking that you’re there to tear BELAY down or there you’re there to tear me down. It’s just a different way of thinking. And I think a lot of times people let personality and communication differences really start to spread them apart and that becomes cancer to an organization.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

I know we talk a lot about intentionality and communication, but I think that at the core of what we’re talking about is you just have to learn to communicate. These assessments are great tools to help you have those conversations. But if you don’t leverage communication and kind of get to the very heart of what you and that your partner are doing there, or you and that team member are doing there, I think that that animosity or tension or those differences could really rot away at things.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. And I think that we were very mindful of our differences to know we’re actually on the same team.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Just because we would handle a situation differently, doesn’t make anybody’s way wrong or right, or better, it was just different. And so now we’re able to kind of, as we look at that and how we make better decisions and resolve conflict, I mean, we really have learned to lean into each other for each other’s opinion, because to your point, I know that you can bring something to my communication style and you do, you add something to it and vice versa that I can support and help you in your communication style.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

I think if people just really realize that if you let the communication differences become a wedge between you and other people or teams or peers, it can become unrecoverable for a lot of people, very tense. I think the best thing we can do to be true, emotionally intelligent adults, is to really know yourself, know the other’s motives and then find the middle ground in between so that the tensions are just normal, natural tensions. And really at the end of the day, we’re all working together and not against each other.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. I mean, every leader needs to have a sense of humility. They need to have a healthy amount of humility. And so if you go into any relationship, personal or professional, and you are arrogant and you think that you were always right and you know everything, your way or the highway, then regardless of what your Enneagram number is, or letter on your DiSC Assessment, you are not going to make friends. Number one, you’re probably not going to have healthy relationships outside of your professional life. And you’re going to have a really hard time rallying your team, your troops, behind what your vision is for your organization.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

If you want something to be successful, you are going to have to learn to be humble, and you’re going to have to learn to be nimble. And you’re going to have to also learn really, to kind of change some of the expectations you have about yourself and about your team because otherwise, it’s not going to happen. If you just think it’s your way all the time, forget it.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. I mean, any organization is built off of a team and I know it sounds very cliche, but nobody wants to work for a boss who’s bossing everybody around, pointing fingers and directing down. I mean, people want to follow leaders and be inspired to do great work. I think regardless of your Enneagram number or your DiSC type, just because I’m an eight and a high D doesn’t mean I need to be bossy and unkind. right?

 

Tricia Sciortino:

I figured out, and I’ve learned over the years as I’ve matured that I can be a direct communicator, but I could also be caring and kind, and somebody worth following and share great vision and all of those things. It’s great to use it as a good tool to really help propel your leadership. Because for me, I’ve used it as a resource to professionally grow as an individual.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right, yes. And never use it as an excuse. Don’t use it as labels. I think in the beginning we did, we were very immature leaders here at BELAY. We had both been leaders before, but here at Belay working remotely and we were learning a lot about ourselves. And so they became kind of these labels, oh, well, you’re a high D and I’m a high S and so that’s just what we do. It kind of almost gave people excuses for their behavior instead of really encouraging to say, “Yeah, that’s a really strong communication tool. And I love that you’re a D but how can you use that D to the benefit of others, not to the detriment of the team.” The same way you would do with a Myers-Briggs test and the Enneagram. We can talk about being an aid and a one, but it’s not in a way that it becomes an excuse, a scapegoat for bad behavior.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Oh yes, absolutely. I actually have a story. Look at me, I’m going to share a story.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

What? I am rubbing off on you.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

See, this is how we help each other grow.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

It was a leader that I worked for in the past, and we were using the languages of appreciation, the five languages of appreciation at work. And one of my languages of appreciation… Again, we love the tests and the tools, they tell us a lot about ourselves. One of mine is words of affirmation. I just like to be told I’m doing a good job. That’s one of my things, I just like to hear it, great job, high five. So that fills my cup and that’s how I feel appreciated.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

My supervisor at the time was not a words of affirmation person. And so we kind of got into a conversation about it and she said, “Oh, how can I better encourage you?” Or whatever the question was? And I said, “Well, I’m kind of a words of affirmation girl, and I would love some more words of affirmation.” And she said, “I don’t do words of affirmation.” And I said, “But shouldn’t you learn how to, since you have somebody working for you who needs them?”

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Circling back to the point, that was my story, taking you to the point that says-

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yay.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

… that says, it doesn’t become an excuse. You don’t use it as an excuse and say, “Oh, I’m an eight. I don’t do that. I’m a D, I don’t do that.” No. No, no, no.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

You want to be a better person tomorrow than you are today. You want to be a better leader tomorrow than you are today. If your team needs something from you that you’re not currently gifted in, then you stretch yourself and you learn how do that thing.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

I think understanding your weaknesses and all of these things, they may never become your strengths, but you could have fewer weaknesses. I mean, couldn’t we all?

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Oh yeah. I mean, it’s compromise. I think that at the heart of every great relationship is compromise and you even have to learn how to compromise in a professional environment, not just on the project or not just what you want your outcome to be, but you have to learn to compromise with your personality and your communication style and meet in the middle.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

We’ve learned a lot over the years, and I think that that’s what makes us, you and I such a great team. Now we kind of joke about that. It is like a marriage. We are each other’s work wives. We have deep personal relationships together, but we have a very deep professional, respectful, goal-driven, passionate relationship that is undeniably powerful. And I think that’s why we’ve been able to get BELAY to where it is today.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes. We’d like to say that we’re a power couple. We just haven’t figured out which one that is yet.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Which one.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Hey, that’s a call to action. Call to action, if you know what power couple we should be. Let us know.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Is Brad and Angelina… I mean, there was Brangelina, whatever.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Brangelina. We always say Thelma and Louise, but they throw themselves off of a cliff and that does not-

 

Tricia Sciortino:

We don’t want to drive a car. Yeah.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

… feel right.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

No, we’ll find the right one. Anyway. Just to bring it down to a practical note.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Let’s just talk a little bit as we get to kind of the One Next Step here at BELAY and we talk about a really practical tactical takeaway from this conversation. Maybe let’s talk through some of the things that we’ve even kind of used to align responsibilities or things with our personality types. For example, you are an amazing CFO and oversee technology and operations, because your one, if you will, is gifted in the details, is gifted in the perfectionism. Your personality style meshes so well with what your oversight is because you are naturally so gifted in those areas. And we were very mindful kind of when we were setting up responsibilities and who kind of is overseeing what, that we really did look at where each of our strengths were. And so then, therefore, what were we going to own for the organization and really kind of charge. So I think that your personality style and your giftedness has really served you to be an amazing CFO and COO for BELAY.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well, thank you. And I would say the same about you and your current role as CEO. Granted, you used to be COO, so you’re also great at the details, but I think that because you’re an Enneagram eight and you do have that high D that you naturally exude strength and dominance. You cast vision really, really well, and people naturally want to follow you because of that strength. I think that when you look at who do you want at the helm of your organization to lead them, it’s somebody who people just naturally look to be a great leader, somebody who is going to go into battle for them who is not going to waiver, those are all the things that are just… I mean, literally, seep out of your pores.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

If you say jump people literally go, “Okay, how high?” Not out of fear, so let me get that… It’s because you have such a huge heart. And again, that’s the part that I know that our team sees and feels. But it’s because of your strength and your determination and how you communicate that so beautifully that you’re just a natural CEO in that role. And so I think… Yeah, I love how you put that.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

In the beginning, we had the time to kind of grow into our roles through what our strengths were naturally, that a lot of organizations don’t get that. But if you’ve got key leaders on your staff, really start to look at what their personalities are and their natural giftings, because as we are finding out, sometimes you also have gaps. There’s a lot of numbers between one and eight and one and nine, and so we’re slowly starting to figure out, “Hey, I’m the perfectionist, and I’m great at the details. And you’re a direct, strong, leader visionary, but maybe we need a couple more people in the middle there to kind of bridge the gap between us.”

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes. And that that’s been a great exercise. For me, I would say if somebody was going to walk away from listening to this episode, my tactical, practical advice would be to, if you haven’t already really start educating yourself about yourself first and foremost, whether it’s taking an Enneagram test, which by the way, there is resources out there, you can get the test for free. A DiSC, a Myers-Brigg, whatever kind of assessments you take to really, truly understand who you are and then do the same for your team, the people that you work so closely with. Do whatever assessment you feel aligned with and understand who your people are.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

And then you can really see it. It’s amazing to see, “Oh, no wonder there’s tension between this and this because look how far apart we are naturally.” And once you can really define where the gaps are when you really kind of can assess yourself and others, then you can start building the bridge. I feel like because we had the opportunity to do a lot of these types of tests over the years, we have been able to build a beautiful bridge all this time to meet each other on both sides, and that’s what worked for us. So that would be my recommendation. And my One Next Step for anybody out there is to learn what you can so you can start building bridges.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. Yeah, and I would say, take it one step further. After you have those assessments, we want you to share them. We want you to share them with your leadership team. And if you don’t have a team yet, if it’s just you and perhaps one person, maybe it’s you and an assistant right now who are building your business, share that so you can understand each other much better. But then don’t take feedback personally. That’s a hard one.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

It is. It really is.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

It’s really hard, yes.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Because I learned, and I’ll never forget it. And I’m not going to say names, but I remember when we first took the test and people looked at me and they’re like, “Oh yeah, that’s you all day long.” And I was like, “Oh gosh,” again, I’m the perfectionist. I’m like, “There’s something wrong with me? There’s not supposed to be anything wrong with me.” But then allowing myself to be vulnerable and really going into the conversation palms up, I was in a much better space to take the feedback, to then be able to go and see the unhealthy areas of my Enneagram one or my DiSC profile and come back ready to embrace those and actually change them.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

If you are maybe more on the direct side and you’ve got a team member who comes to you and shares some feedback, don’t be gruff. Go in there with open palms and really accept that. And then look to see how you can improve on that and do the same. One of the things we learned is, “Hey, may I give you some feedback? May I share something with you?” That way they’re prepared for it.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes. And all people are perfectly designed.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Even though some of these things might show us weaknesses, we are all perfectly designed. We are all unique and we are all beautiful. And as long as we remember that, regardless of where our strengths and weaknesses lie, we win.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Ugh, What a perfect end right there. That was a perfect bow.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Perfect.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well, now it’s time for the One Next Step. As the most practical business podcast, we want to make sure taking action isn’t overwhelming to you. So each episode we’re going to offer you One Next Step to propel you and your business forward.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Today’s next step is to download this episode’s activation guide, which is our personality assessment cheat sheet. Look at that, we’re already giving you resources. We’ve rounded up all the personality assessments we use here at Belay. We’re going to share where you can find them. Collectively, they can help you discover how you interpret the world, manage your emotions and show up to others around you. And if everyone on your team shares their findings, you’ll be on your way to leveraging your differences to make a better organization.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Absolutely. To download it now, text the phrase One Next Step to 31-996 or visit OneNextStepPodcast.com. And when you request today’s guide, you will also receive a summary of today’s episode, which includes key quotes and takeaways and links to the resources we mentioned in the episode.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Thank you so much for listening to this episode of One Next Step. We hope you enjoyed what you are hearing from us. And so now we want to hear from you. Head over to Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts and leave us a review. We created this podcast to help you lead your team and grow your business, so guess what? We read every one of them.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Until next time. Own your journey. It’s your life and your business. It’s up to you to create the life and organization you want. Join us next week for more practical tips and actionable tools to advance your business one step at a time.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Start by making today count.

 

Speaker 3:

Thanks for listening to One Next Step. Be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or follow us on Spotify. Then, join us next time for more practical business tips and tools to help you get more done, grow your business and lead your team with competence. For more episodes, show notes and helpful resources, visit OneNextStepPodcast.com.

Download this episode’s activation guide, our Personality Assessment Cheat Sheet. We rounded up all of the personality assessments we use at BELAY and share where you can find them. Collectively, they can help you discover how you interpret the world, manage your emotions, and show up to others around you. And, if everyone on your team shares their findings, you’ll be on your way to leveraging your differences to better the organization.

 

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In each episode, we highlight one next step for you and provide an activation or delegation guide to help you immediately take action, start applying what you learn, and get your team to help you.

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Join Us Next Week

Thank you for listening to One Next Step.

Join us next week when we’ll be talking about the power of personal branding with our good friend, Kevin Jennings. Kevin is a personal brand strategist and business coach who empowers entrepreneurs, authors, speakers, and subject matter experts with a plan and resources to turn their vision into value and their passion into profit. He’ll chat with us about what a personal brand is, why it matters, and how it can help you gain more clients and better lead your team.