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Harnessing The "It" Platforms: Turning Social Into Sales & Followers Into Ambassadors

This week’s download is Phil Pallen’s popular download, “100 Evergreen Content Ideas to Post.” If you’re ready to create brand ambassadors and leverage social media for sales, this will make sure you never have to worry about what to post next.

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About This Episode

When companies think of staff or customers posting on their social media channels, they become fearful. What will be said? Will this hurt my business? How can I make it stop if it gets out of hand? 

 

Phil Pallen, CEO of Phil Pallen Collective and the host of the Brand Therapy podcast, joins Tricia and Lisa to help you overcome these fears and see how social media can be an incredible sales tool, allowing you to use your team members and customers as ambassadors for your brand.

1. Branding is simply recreating the in-person experience online, as closely as possible.

You should want to humanize your marketing, keeping in mind that social media types might change over the years, but they will always come down to interactions between humans. Don’t make it overwhelming and complicated.

2. When it comes to marketing, make it a conversation, not a broadcast.

Listen to your customers. Really listen to them! Don’t be afraid to have a conversation about their experiences, interests, and life priorities. It’s becoming less and less about traditional demographics and more about qualitative features and characteristics of your customers. Your customers will have interesting things to say if you will listen.

3. Listen to yourself.

It’s all about content and personality. The content is what you say and the personality is the unique way only you can say it. Phil Pallen uses a transcription tool called Otter that allows you to see your conversations and how you are reacting to different things in real time. When you capture everything in this way, you’ll always be able to find little nuggets of wisdom that you might have forgotten about before. You can use those as social media posts!

 

How do you feel about the following groups as brand ambassadors for your business right now: 1) Customers 2) Employees 3) Leadership?
What are the strengths and weaknesses of your brand when it comes to social media?
Have you ever felt self-promotional for posting something about yourself or company? Did Phil’s advice help? If so, in what way?
What are some current examples of brand ambassadors in your company?

Branding is based on how we communicate, how we connect, how we love, and how we find passion.

Phil Pallen

When you do something interesting and creative, that's what people remember, and when people remember, that's branding.

Phil Pallen

Brand ambassadorship is about making a variety of different people fall in love with and speak positively about your brand.

Phil Pallen

Companies are not exempt from humanizing.

Phil Pallen

(02:03) Phil talks about the one city he’s never visited that he wants to visit the most. 

(03:54) Phil explains how he got into marketing and helping people build their brands. 

(06:20) What is a “brand ambassador,” and what type of value do they bring to an organization?

(07:32) Branding is simply recreating the in-person experience online, as closely as possible. 

(09:55) Three ways to build brand ambassadors: 1) Customers 2) Employees 3) Leadership

(12:49) What’s a practical tip for how leaders can steward their teams to be ambassadors?

(13:41) How do we help our customers become brand ambassadors?

(16:25) When you do something interesting and creative, that’s what people remember. And, when people remember it, that’s branding. 

(18:39) Branding success is not built overnight.

(19:44) What are some tips for people who feel like marketing themselves is a form of bragging and self promotion?

(25:37) What is one area that a leader should start in first if they feel like all of this is overwhelming?

(32:48) This week’s download is Phil Pallen’s popular download, “100 Evergreen Content Ideas to Post.” If you’re ready to create brand ambassadors and leverage social media for sales, this will make sure you never have to worry about what to post next.

Phil Pallen:

When they decided to launch a new product, it was a candle. They hadn’t done a candle before, rather than them deciding on the scent, they took it to their audience in a blog post and said, here’s what we’re thinking of doing, but we want you to be a part of this decision-making process. What do you think our first candle should be?

Phil Pallen:

Comments on this blog post were over a thousand comments of people wanting to contribute. So some of these things we don’t think immediately, “oh, we can do that.” But actually, you can. And when you do something interesting and creative, that’s what people remember. And when people remember that, that’s branding.

Speaker 2:

Welcome to One Next Step, the most practical business podcast in the world. Helping you get more done, grow your business, and lead your team with confidence with tips and tools you didn’t get in business school. Here are your hosts, Tricia Sciortino and Lisa Zeeveld.

Tricia Sciortino:

Welcome to One Next Step. The practical business podcast that helps you run your business so it stops running you. I’m Tricia.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And I’m LZ. In this episode, we’re joined by brand strategist, Phil Pallen, to talk about how you can create brand ambassadors and turn social media into a sales tool.

Tricia Sciortino:

Phil is the CEO of Phil Pallen Collective, LLC, and the host of the Brand Therapy podcast. He’s a brand strategist and keynote speaker who helps people and companies position, build, and promote their brands.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah, this guy’s like the Yoda of brand strategy. He has so much wisdom and energy. Today he’s going to talk with us about how to use social media as a sales tool, and how to equip our clients and fans to be brand ambassadors. This is great information. So let’s get going with our talk with Phil.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Welcome Phil. We are super excited to have you on the podcast today. So thank you for joining us.

Phil Pallen:

I am so happy to be here. I’ve known you both for about 30 seconds, and I’m already so impressed by you. So this is going to be good.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I think so, too. Well, thank you. Well, we always love to start these interviews off with kind of a fun question. Maybe something that your normal listeners might not know about you. So are you ready for our question?

Tricia Sciortino:

Readier than ever.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Okay, great. Now we’ve talked a little bit about travel, so I think you’re going to have a hard time with this one, but my question for you is what is the one city that you’ve never visited, but that you want to visit the most, and why?

Phil Pallen:

I have no trouble answering that because it’s been plaguing my mind. At the time of recording this great little chat we’re about to have, I’m in Istanbul, Turkey, and I’m feeling probably how a lot of us feel, which is like this sense of freedom after being cooped up in the house for over a year. So this question is very easy for me to answer. I am so physically close to Greece right now, a country I’ve never been to. And my dreams are full of images that I’ve seen from Google images instead of real life of Santorini.

Phil Pallen:

So the answer to that question is not hard for me. It’s Santorini, Greece, which is so close to me right now. It’s a little tricky to travel around Europe. And I just got my vaccination over here. And I have some days to wait, but I hope to visit that city in the next few months. So we’ll see.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Oh good. Okay. We’re going to need an update from you because that is also on my list. And I know it’s on Tricia’s too.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes. Like I was just emailing a travel agent about, can I go next summer, spring fall? When can I go to Greece?

Phil Pallen:

Just give me something to look forward to!

Tricia Sciortino:

Let’s just get it on a calendar and then have a countdown.

Phil Pallen:

Get it on a calendar and have something to look forward to. That’s almost as important as the trip itself.

Lisa Zeeveld:

It totally is.

Tricia Sciortino:

Totally.

Lisa Zeeveld:

It really is.

Tricia Sciortino:

Hope. Yes. So Phil, tell us your story. What’s your bio? How do you wind up being the brand ambassador you are, the marketer you are? Tell us a little bit about your journey and your story that brings you where you are today.

Phil Pallen:

I would love to. And I’m going to keep it brief because I love the format of this podcast. It’s short and it’s punchy. And I tell people, if you want to know more, Google me, baby. My name is Phil. I’m originally from Canada. I’ve been based in the US for many, many years. I lived in LA for lots of years. Worked in entertainment.

Phil Pallen:

My longest client is a shark on Shark Tank who worked on a lot of TV shows. And 2017, packed up my comfortable life in Santa Monica and decided to work full-time remotely. So now I am a digital nomad, have been for quite some time. Pre-pandemic. Now it’s very trendy to be digital nomad. Honey, I started that trend years ago. They didn’t start it. But I rode that wave.

Tricia Sciortino:

You were a pioneer.

Phil Pallen:

I was a pioneer. I’m going to go with that.

Tricia Sciortino:

Pioneer.

Phil Pallen:

You called me a pioneer. We’re going to rock with that. And so luckily in this job, as a brand strategist, I help people and companies position, build, and promote their brands. And I’m able to do this completely remotely. My clients don’t really care where I am. I mean, some of them are like, Phil, it’d be nice to get together in real life, which I’m a bit like Carmen Sandiego. It’s like, no one asked how I am. They ask where I am. Where are you today? And the answer is usually outrageous.

Phil Pallen:

But given this type of work, I’m able to do it. As long as I get my work done, I can do it from anywhere. I’d say the thing that makes me different than other people in marketing or in branding is that I focus on people. And so I will brand startups and companies, but my area of expertise and my reputation, now it’s been a decade as of this month, is really in personal branding. I started doing that in 2011 before it was really a thing or at least as we know it now. So that’s what I get really excited about. And I’m sure we’ll talk about it today.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes. Well, and that really leads us into a question about personal branding and also like a brand ambassador because I feel like that term – I’m ready to learn a lot because I feel like in my mind I have one idea about what a brand ambassador is. And I think that you’re going to kind of rock a world here and kind of steer me in a different direction. So help us understand what a real brand ambassador is, and the type of value that they bring to businesses.

Phil Pallen:

Yes. I love this question because when we think, or when we discuss this idea of brand ambassadorship, I guess I’ll start by saying this technology is always evolving. Social media platforms that we’re spending our time on right now are going to be different than where we are year, two, three from now. But there’s one thing that’s not going to change. And it’s the human component of how we interact, of how we market, of how we communicate.

Phil Pallen:

So this idea brand ambassadorship is based on humans. It’s based on how we communicate, how we connect, how we love, how we find passion. And so the medium might be different now, or when you’re listening to this, or five years from now, but I love these instances of business, or at least functioning of business, that are based on humans. So when I define personal branding, branding, even, this is connected to this idea of brand ambassadorship, I think branding is simply recreating the in-person experience online as closely as possible.

Phil Pallen:

We juggled two versions of ourselves. The in-person experience. I have the privilege, distinct privilege to be looking at both of you in the eyes. I mean, if we were together in real life, we’d probably have maybe a little glass of wine, depending on what time it was, and we’d laughing.

Tricia Sciortino:

Does the time matter time?

Lisa Zeeveld:

Does the time really matter?

Phil Pallen:

Time doesn’t matter. I was saying that just to be polite.

Lisa Zeeveld:

OK. Good

Phil Pallen:

Time does not matter to me. If it’s breakfast then it’s mimosas. We’ll find a way.

Tricia Sciortino:

That’s right.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Light on the orange juice.

Phil Pallen:

Light.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Light.

Phil Pallen:

In fact, if you’ve run out of orange juice, don’t even worry.

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s right.

Phil Pallen:

So this is pretty close to real life. And it’s a privilege in 2021 to have this kind of interaction. And so when I think about this concept of brand ambassadorship, making a variety of different people fall in love and speak positively about your brand, harder for corporations than for individual brands, we’ll speak to that in just a moment. I think this is all based on how humans interact, and that is never going to change.

Phil Pallen:

And that’s why we need to invest in it. We need to prioritize it. We need to wrap our heads around how can we do this in a way that isn’t confusing or overwhelming? I hate buzzwords. Hopefully I don’t say any of them in this. I don’t even love the term branding.

Tricia Sciortino:

Pivot, pivot, pivot!

Phil Pallen:

Oh, I don’t even like the term branding, to be honest. I use it to give context for what I do. But I just, I like the human. I think you already can tell this by my energy. I like the human part of interaction, of marketing, of branding. So let me just give one other quick thought I have on this. People in a more corporate environment are going, well, how does that make sense? How do we make corporation more human? Or what are those opportunities to humanize or build brand ambassadors?

Phil Pallen:

This is literally what I speak about. If I go in and do a keynote for an organization, I go in and teach. There are three opportunities in this organization to build brand ambassadors. We have three. Let’s do it. Number one, customers. Your customers, that’s an obvious one. So making your customers love your brand so much that they use their valuable minutes and words to talk about you in a positive way.

Phil Pallen:

And we can talk about examples, but I’ll move on to the next. I think we can all think of examples of companies that do a great- Glossier Makeup is a great one. Or I was reading about Rihanna today in the news. She’s now a billionaire, not because of her music, but because of her makeup.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And lingerie. Yes.

Phil Pallen:

And lingerie, I was just going to say. And then other companies that have been founded from this. So that’s an example. And there’s a lot of people who speak positively about that that buy her products, and love her products, and love that. That’s humanizing of a brand. For corporations, two other distinct opportunities. So we talked about customers, one that gets forgotten about, employees.

Phil Pallen:

We want our employees and the people on the inside of this to be brand ambassadors. Let’s not forget about them. Let’s not forget about empowering the people on the inside that actually make it happen. Sometimes we get so focused on our customer and all of these like made up things like archetypes, whatever, but sometimes it can get a little too much. And I think we need to think, wow, how do we make sure people on the inside are having a great experience, are speaking positively about the company they work for?

Phil Pallen:

The final opportunity for building brand ambassadors within an organization is the leadership at the very top. This helps us paint a picture for where it started, where those storytelling opportunities exist. Why did the founder create this? What was their motivation? What continues to motivate the organization as a whole?

Phil Pallen:

Richard Branson and Virgin is probably the best example of humanizing a brand through leadership. And so all that to say, companies are not exempt from humanizing their brands to build brand ambassadors. Those are my- I said I’d keep it short, but I really like the question. So I went a while.

Lisa Zeeveld:

No, I like how you said humanize, because I think that’s one of the things that, as I kind of jump into the whole social media, understanding that it’s the human aspect of it. Because some people are so just doggone polished, and everything looks amazing. But you’re right. I don’t really feel like I know them.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And so it’s sort of the realness is what I appreciate the most about the folks that I, gosh, can’t believe I’m going to say, but then I wake up in the morning, I’m like, oh, what is she doing today? I don’t care where she’s at. I’m just sucked into her whole life because I feel like I know her because she has- that person or that brand has humanized the whole experience for me.

Phil Pallen:

Totally.

Tricia Sciortino:

So, if we talk about, you talk about your last point about leadership, leading the company to be ambassadors. Would there be a practical tip or example you can give on how leaders can steward their teams to be ambassadors?

Phil Pallen:

Yes. Give them attention, give them a voice, give them a say, give them stake in decision making rather than you deciding on a campaign, or a certain look, or a color of a logo, or any of these types of things that maybe the leadership might decide because it’s an important decision. Let your team be a part of that decision making process because they’ll feel more stake. I mean that’s an immediate one right away. If people feel like they’re involved with a decision, then they care more about the outcome.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. So then because we can’t really do that with our customers. I mean, I guess you can, you can put out polls and those types of things to get their buy in.

Phil Pallen:

You can, yeah.

Lisa Zeeveld:

But how do we help our customers become brand ambassadors?

Phil Pallen:

Sure. I mean, one of the ways immediately that I can think of is it’s not totally different to what I just said about employees, but listening, but really, really listening. Not being afraid to have a conversation with your customer about their experience, about their interests, about their life priorities. I would say the direction that marketing is heading, it’s less about traditional demographics.

Phil Pallen:

My customer is age 24 to 48, men and women in the United States. It’s just not enough anymore. Those kinds of traditional demographics are so lame, lame, lame, lame, lame, lame. What’s more interesting are the qualitative features or characteristics of your customer. And so I think we forget that we can talk to our customer. We can discuss, listen, start to actually make sense of the data we get from them. And also not be afraid if they have something constructive to say. Sometimes we’re a little afraid to hear like, oh, it wasn’t a good experience, or they have something negative to say. Let it be a humbling moment. Learn from it.

Phil Pallen:

Just because it’s coming from one person doesn’t mean it’s a universal truth. But to your point, it’s actually, yeah, I mean, to let customers- there’s an interesting example of this. I mentioned Glossier a few minutes ago, and maybe I’ll use them as another example. But Glossier, a makeup company, started as a blog about makeup. And when they decided to launch a new product, it was a candle. They hadn’t done a candle before. Rather than just deciding what the- I was going to say flavor, but you don’t eat a candle. So it’s not a flavor. The scent of the candle.

Tricia Sciortino:

The scent.

Phil Pallen:

Not a flavor. We’re not going to eat it. Rather than…

Tricia Sciortino:

I mean, if you’re two. You might.

Phil Pallen:

I mean, if you’re hungry, maybe.

Tricia Sciortino:

A toddler might.

Phil Pallen:

Yeah, exactly. Rather than them deciding on the scent, they took it to their audience in a blog post and said, here’s what we’re thinking of doing. But we want you to be a part of this decision-making process. What do you think our first candle should be? The comments on this blog post were over a thousand comments of people wanting to contribute.

Phil Pallen:

So there was just a- my brain is like a little encyclopedia of little examples of this stuff. But some of these things we don’t think immediately, oh, we can do that. But actually you can. And when you do something interesting and creative, that’s what people remember. And when people remember that, that’s branding.

Tricia Sciortino:

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Lisa Zeeveld:

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Lisa Zeeveld:

I was amazed. I have a teenage daughter. I was amazed, you mentioned Glossier, about how really their tribe supports them greatly. I mean, I stood in an hour for my daughter for two hours to get inside their New York city showroom. Two hours just because people wanted to be able to touch the products, be in that beautiful environment, and you think, how many of us, business owners, business leaders would love it if somebody wanted to wait two hours just to walk inside to a place and to say they were a part of that.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And I think that’s what’s, to me, it’s about creating a product or a service that’s infectious. That becomes so infectious that people all around the world want to be a part of it. Even if they can touch it, smell it, wear it, they just want to feel like they belong to something. And maybe there’s something deeper there.

Phil Pallen:

Well, I’m, first of all, so happy I used them as an example now knowing you have [inaudible 00:18:35] experience. How perfect. We didn’t plan that.

Lisa Zeeveld:

No, no.

Phil Pallen:

I think there’s an important point to be added here and that’s that it’s not built overnight. And we all want it, but we all can’t have it tomorrow.

Lisa Zeeveld:

True.

Phil Pallen:

And so I think we have to remember, this is a marathon, not a sprint. Rather than focusing so much on that end goal that we want, it’s like, yes, that’s important, but let’s take some small steps backwards and work towards that finishing the marathon and not just focusing on the first mile. So I think one of those first steps is what we’ve talked about is instead of broadcasting your product, your service, letting people know as if it’s an announcement on a loud speaker, let’s turn the broadcast into a conversation.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Oh, good.

Phil Pallen:

However way that feels right for your brand, let’s make it a conversation. And I think that’s mile number one, I think that’s mile number one to achieving that level of brand ambassadorship or just brand enthusiasm, whatever you want to call it.

Tricia Sciortino:

I love that. That goes into the next question I have for you. And I just ran into this with one of my girlfriends last week. So she’s starting her own business and she’s starting to talk about herself and her business on social media, and it feels completely awkward and braggadocia. Am I bragging about myself? How do I – even though the first couple things she put out there were client testimonies and quotes like that.

Tricia Sciortino:

And so I think some people are nervous or scared to kind of put themselves out there in the universe. And so what are some maybe tips or advice you would give people who feel that way? And are there any things maybe you should look out for or not do? I feel like maybe you answered part of that now where you said don’t just loudspeaker and speak yourself into the universe. But any tips for a situation like that?

Phil Pallen:

Yeah. I have some additional ideas to add to that because what you’ve described sounds like something we can all relate to. Let’s say we’re at a party and we’re standing there, not by choice, having a conversation with someone that is bragging about themselves, or in whatever way it’s manifesting, they’re seemingly not self-aware. We can all relate to those people.

Phil Pallen:

And so, immediately I jumped to not I don’t like this person, but I think, why are they this way? Or where is the disconnect? How does this person not know that they have horrible breath? How does this person not that they sound completely insane? Or how can they not hear that they are just bragging and one-upping everything that I’m saying. So it’s a classic example of that. We talk about this idea of personal branding is achieving consistency between who we are in real life and how that’s communicated online.

Phil Pallen:

I would work, as a good friend, maybe you can find a way to say this politely, but how can that person, how can we all, actually, work towards becoming more self aware so the experience online feels consistent with how we show up in real life? And I will give an example. If I post something on social media that is too serious, people are going to be concerned. I don’t go very many minutes without cracking a joke. That’s just my personality because it’s just how I am. I like to keep it light.

Phil Pallen:

I do the same thing online. Once I write an Instagram caption, I’ll go through it and I’ll go, how can I make this a little more true to how I would speak it out loud in real life? And that’s how people know Phil. Not to say that everyone needs to be funny or humorous. People can be thoughtful. They can be reflective. There’s a lot of softer qualities that we can become aware of. It’s really all about being self aware.

Phil Pallen:

I would say that person, that example is an instance where someone needs to build an inventory system of how they show up in real life. You said they’re your friends. So there’s something you like about that person. And I want that thing that we like about that person to come across online. And so there’s a great free tool that I recommend for people to do this. If you are active on social media, this thing can save you a ton of time, and actually improve the way you show up online. This free tool is called Otter.

Phil Pallen:

I know podcasters that use this to transcribe their podcast audio into notes. There’s other ways of using this. You could record meetings and have those meetings transcribed. But Otter is a free transcription tool. And I recommend that people learn to listen, not just to the people around them, but actually to yourself. Listen to yourself. How you speak, what you say, content, and how you say it, personality. Those are the two components that make up you from a sense of understanding, okay, you in real life and you online.

Phil Pallen:

Content, what you say, personality, the unique way that you, and only you, deliver that information or content. Those are the two variables.

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s great.

Phil Pallen:

Otter is a great way- I could be recording myself, and actually not could be, I should be recording myself right now on Otter, and I could have this transcribed. Why? Because I’m having a conversation, not with strangers, with new friends where we’re talking about things and perspectives that I probably haven’t talked about. This is the environment where I’m sharing, for example, thought leadership.

Phil Pallen:

And we’re having conversations that are not scripted, they’re not planned, they’re just happening. And so I could write 10 Instagram captions from this conversation.

Tricia Sciortino:

Off of- yeah.

Phil Pallen:

Exactly. From this conversation. Or even just my own iterations of paragraphs, etc. So Otter’s a great free tool that people can use to build this concept of self-inventory on client calls, on podcast interviews, when you’re out on a walk, when you’re commuting and you’ve got that idea.

Tricia Sciortino:

I love it.

Phil Pallen:

Don’t leave it in your head. Get it out. Say it out loud and get it in your inbox so you can be productive with it.

Lisa Zeeveld:

So Otter, like the cute little animals?

Phil Pallen:

Yes. Otter.ai. That is the tool.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well, my last question for you, Phil, because this has just been amazing, is I’m thinking there’s somebody out there who, let’s take our business owners right now, and they love the idea of having a brand ambassador. They get what you say. We need to focus on our clients and our employees, and them, as the leader, what their tone is. But it all seems a little overwhelming.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Is there one area that they maybe should start first? I don’t know, should they start with the customers and say, hey, can you go out there and talk about me? Or does it really start with them and it kind of trickles down?

Phil Pallen:

Yeah, that’s a really good question. And in this case, I’m not sure that there’s a one answer fits all approach. I think even to start by having the curiosity of what you just said, having the curiosity of where is the right place to begin? I can think of some clients and some examples where the right place to begin is inward.

Phil Pallen:

When we look at some companies that we all know and love that have created a culture that we’ve fallen in love with, many times that trickles down from the top. That is the behavior, the actions, the reputation of the leadership at the top. So I think starting inward or starting with that leadership component is never a bad idea.

Phil Pallen:

At the same time, if this is a bit of an emergency situation, let’s say we have employees that are not happy, then what can we do to fix it? In that instance, if that’s a bit of like an emergency mode situation, then I wouldn’t be starting at the leadership. I would go, okay, let’s listen to our employees. Make them feel heard and actually listen to them, and create a plan of action to improve the situation.

Phil Pallen:

I mean, that’s what consultants do when they go into an organization. They have to hire someone from the outside to come inside. Well, in some instances, ideally we can do that ourselves with small businesses. We don’t have budgets for McKinsey. So I would say it’s case by case.

Phil Pallen:

Then there are instances too, let’s say we’re not selling, or there’s a problem with sales or marketing. Then there might be an issue with our messaging, marketing, etc. That’s an instance where there’s a disconnect from what we’re doing here to pump out a product or services going to the customer.

Phil Pallen:

In that unique instance, I would say let’s focus now on building brand ambassadorship, getting some clarity around the customer piece. I guess all of that to say, it’s going to vary case by case. But the one through line here is that you must be crystal clear on your goals. You must be crystal clear on your business goals as it relates to branding or marketing, which is what I often speak about. Or at least that’s the lens I approach things in.

Phil Pallen:

I would say nothing matters, nothing can be done until you’re crystal clear on your business goals. Don’t have to know them overnight, but prioritize it. Spend some time to get clear on where the ship is going, where this marathon is going to be run so we can start to work backwards and take those false steps that we’ve been talking about.

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s awesome. Well, I feel like, okay. I said it was my last question, but I feel like we have so much more to talk about. And you actually kind of prompted me for another question. So Phil, would you mind just hanging on for another second, and perhaps I can ask you a…

Phil Pallen:

I’m so here.

Lisa Zeeveld:

… a question about sales and we could create something…

Phil Pallen:

I love when you break the rules. You break your own rules.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah, I’m a rule breaker.

Phil Pallen:

Yeah, I love it.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Great. Well, Phil, thank you for staying on to answer one more question. And hey, you guys, you do not want to miss this. In order to hear the clip, you’re going to need to subscribe to our email list. And we’ll send you the link to all of our bonus content. Or you can visit onenextsteppodcast.com where you can find the link to all of our show notes.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Wow. I mean, I am serious. I am so full of joy right now. Phil really brought the energy. He was so much fun. I loved it.

Tricia Sciortino:

He was fun.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I know, I know.

Tricia Sciortino:

He was fun. That’s part of my takeaway. I mean, that’s not my takeaway, but it is my takeaway. So my takeaway was really how in the beginning of our conversation, he honed in on the humanization of marketing, and ambassadorship is really about people and relationships, which, of course, makes absolute sense.

Tricia Sciortino:

But I don’t know that a lot of organizations invest the time, energy, and effort to really care and listen to their customers, and teams, and those things. So I love- keyword, just humanize the whole thing, which is important.

Tricia Sciortino:

And then my other takeaway was related, not related to the topic, but he is a great fun reminder that we should not take ourselves so seriously, and work should be fun.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Totally. Yes.

Tricia Sciortino:

And to bring joy. And I love how he said everybody would know, like after three sentences, if he didn’t say a joke, something was wrong. And so I totally subscribe to that way of work and life that bringing energy and making it fun is so important to culture, work-life harmony, and it’s one of our core values.

Lisa Zeeveld:

We don’t take ourselves too seriously.

Tricia Sciortino:

We don’t take ourselves too seriously.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Seriously.

Tricia Sciortino:

Seriously. We have a core value of fun. And so I thought Phil was fun. That’s my takeaway. What is yours? What about you?

Lisa Zeeveld:

I mean, I agree with you. And I think a lot of times- I’m going to not share my point real quick because I want to reiterate yours. I think a lot of new business will- maybe even going back to your friend. They look at established businesses and perhaps their Instagram or TikTok. Everything is just perfect. They’re very curated pieces, thoughtful content. And so they start out that way.

Lisa Zeeveld:

But what they’re doing is it makes it really cold and unrelatable because they are missing that human thing.

Tricia Sciortino:

Totally.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And so, really, my takeaway, it was kind of with that is that when you start this journey of building brand ambassadors within your organization is really do it what your business needs. Find where the gap is in your business. I think he’s right, I think you do need to copy, when you’re learning about using it as a sales tool, look at what is resonating with individuals who might be within the space that you’re trying to get into.

Lisa Zeeveld:

But ultimately, don’t think that you have to start out immediately and find customers to be brand ambassadors. If your employees don’t know what your why is, and they don’t even want to rep your stuff or talk about the brand that they work for, if they don’t want to talk about the brand that they work for then I think that’s a problem too. So my takeaway is really just to make sure that everything is customized, and that you fill the gap where you see it most appropriate.

Tricia Sciortino:

Totally agree. I think it’s unique for every organization. So that was a great, that’s a great point.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well, as always folks, we have a download for you, so you can take your One Next Step. This week’s One Next Step is Phil Pallin’s popular download 100 Evergreen Content Ideas To Post. If you are ready to create brand ambassadors and leverage social media for sales, this will make sure you never have to worry about what to post next.

Tricia Sciortino:

I am excited to leverage this download myself. Okay guys, so text the phrase One Next Step to 31996, or visit onenextsteppodcast.com and you’ll get access to today’s resources to help you keep moving forward.

Tricia Sciortino:

Thank you for joining us today. Guys, we will see you next week for another great episode filled with practical tips and actionable tools to advance your business one step at a time.

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s right. So start by making today count.

Tricia Sciortino:

You don’t want to miss next weeks episode when will chat with Whitney Johnson, the CEO of disruption advisors an Inc. 5000, 2020 fastest growing private company in America. Who is also one of the 50 leading business thinkers in the world is named by thinkers 50. She’s going to talk with us about why more leaders should spend more time investing in their teams. Take a quick listen to her talk with Whitney.

Whitney Johnson:

So I do think there’s some element of guilt, but I know for me and perhaps this for other people, we don’t actually know how to rest. We don’t know how to take a break. So there’s some element of learning involved in this and real discomfort of actually stopping and slowing down.

Speaker 2:

Thanks for listening to One Next Step. Be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, or follow us on Spotify. Then join us next time for more practical business tips and tools to help you get more done, grow your business, and lead your team with confidence. For more episodes, show notes, and helpful resources, visit onenextsteppodcast.com.

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