Skip to main content
Reading Time: 27 minutes
Your One Next Step

Access this week’s activation guide

3 Tools to Unlock Your Leadership Potential

For even more leadership insights from our very own Lisa Zeeveld, watch her Ted Talk, “Going Beyond Growth Mindset with Self-Efficacy.”

 

Watch Now

Apple Podcasts

Spotify

Google Podcasts

Stitcher

About This Episode

Business professionals often lack the guidance they need to grow their careers, which limits their opportunities, influence, and impact. When they have a proven process to help them develop their emotional intelligence, relationships, and skillset, they gain confidence, accelerate their growth, master their goals, and succeed personally and professionally. 

 

In this special episode, Tricia will interview Lisa about how you can unlock your leadership potential, a topic she’s extremely passionate about.

1. Don’t just promote leaders.

Help them grow into one. You can do that by helping them understand what it means to be a leader, what it means to be a better person. That takes time. It’s an investment. True mentorship isn’t just about passing along a book to read. It’s about building relationships that foster growth.

2. You need to understand yourself before you can really grow as a leader.

This is emotional intelligence. It’s about how you show up and the type of influence you have in a room. Leaders without emotional intelligence lose influence and effectiveness. It’s not about changing who you are. It’s about understanding who you are.

3. Relationships matter.

You have to value people if you want to be a great leader. You don’t rise alone. You need a great support system with people who will advocate for you. Find people who will speak your name in a good way when you’re not around.

 

Who has been the greatest influence as a leader in your career?
Would you consider yourself emotionally intelligent? Why or why not?
Talk about a time you felt uncertain as a leader. How did you respond and how did the situation resolve itself?
How would you answer the question, “What does it feel like to be on the other side of me?”

When we start to understand how we show up, we can better understand how our leadership affects others.

Lisa Zeeveld

Leadership is about helping others become better leaders and better people.

Lisa Zeeveld

A great leader is somebody who can keep others accountable, but that they can also keep themselves accountable.

Lisa Zeeveld

Great leaders value people.

Lisa Zeeveld

(01:30) Lisa shares a random, fun fact about herself. 

(05:15) Lisa talks about why she’s so passionate about helping people develop as professionals and leaders. 

(07:47) What are some of the obstacles people face in developing as leaders?

(08:59) Don’t just promote people to leaders. Help them grow into being one. 

(10:02) Lisa talks about emotional intelligence and its role in developing as a leader. 

(15:08) What should a leader do first when they feel unequipped or stuck?

(18:10) What are 3 tools someone can take to unlock their leadership potential and take steps in the right directions?

(20:18) “What does it feel like to be on the other side of me?”

(21:12) Find someone who will speak your name in a really good way when you’re not around. 

(23:08) At some point in your leadership journey, you have to learn how to stop being “the doer” and become “the vision caster.”

(25:35) How can someone know if leading people is right for them?

(26:15) A leader keeps others accountable while keeping themselves accountable. 

(30:30) There is a huge value in an outside perspective, people you can talk to outside of the workplace, who will be honest with you.

(32:30) This week’s next step:  Go watch Lisa’s Ted Talk, “Going Beyond Growth Mindset with Self-Efficacy.”

Lisa Zeeveld:

The crux of emotional intelligence is helping you understand how you show up. And I think that when we start to understand how we show up, we can better understand how our leadership affects others.

Speaker 2:

Welcome to One Next Step, the most practical business podcast in the world, helping you get more done, grow your business and lead your team with confidence, with tips and tools you didn’t get in business school. Here are your hosts, Tricia Sciortino and Lisa Zeeveld.

Tricia Sciortino:

Welcome to One Next Step. I’m Tricia, the CEO of BELAY.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And I’m Lisa, the CFO of BELAY.

Tricia Sciortino:

Okay. So today guys, we have a very unique episode for you. I have the honor of interviewing the lovely Lisa LZ today. If you don’t know, Lisa is very passionate about helping develop emerging leaders and new entrepreneurs. And so we’re going to chat about why she’s so passionate about that and how leaders can unlock their potential, make an impact on their teams and succeed professionally and personally, I’m excited LZ.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Wow. That’s a long list of things, right?

Tricia Sciortino:

I know. Are you ready to bring it?

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes. So this is super fun. I like this.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. Well, so we’ve done over 50 episodes now, I’m so proud of us.

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s crazy. I know. Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

Look at us, go. And I feel like our audience probably has a good idea about you, they’ve learned a lot about us along the way, but is there some random thing maybe you have not shared that you would love to share as an icebreaker? Like random, fun LZ fact.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. Random, fun. I mean, I feel like, I mean, I’m an open book, so I feel like there’s not much that people don’t know about me, but people are usually surprised to find out that I have lived in 27 different homes.

Tricia Sciortino:

I mean, that’s a lot of houses.

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s a lot, I mean, I feel like that’s a lot.

Tricia Sciortino:

That’s an interesting fact. I don’t think many people could say that.

Lisa Zeeveld:

No. And I mean, I’m not embarrassed of my age, so this is being recorded in 2021, so I just turned 46. So I’ve lived in 27 different homes, so not cities, anything like, but I’ve moved 27 times in 46 years, so.

Tricia Sciortino:

It’s like every other year? More than that year.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Every other year. Yeah. And it’s interesting because that definitely plays into my personality and really how, going back to why I value people so much because moving that often in, I mean, a lot of that movement happened when I was school age. And so I’d be, I went to eighth grade in two different schools, I went to two different schools in seventh grade. So I did a lot of movement and I had to learn to meet people really easily and converge on different social circles. And I know what it’s like to be the outsider and so I feel like I have so much more empathy and compassion because I have been the outsider a lot. And I don’t know, I feel like that helps.

Tricia Sciortino:

The new girl. Yeah. You’ve been the new girl. So here’s what else as your friend, I would say that has shown up in your life is that probably because you’ve moved so frequently, you are one that does not save things. You don’t have boxes of crap in an attic, you could pack three boxes and move your whole life in a minute. You are the opposite of a pack rat, you keep what you feel you must keep and the rest is gone.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes. That is so true. Yeah. My parents were not sentimental people, well, I should say that my mom is not very sentimental. I think that my dad definitely keeps a lot more stuff that my mom does, my parents are divorced and so there you go. Maybe there’s something there.

Tricia Sciortino:

Another fun fact. Yeah.

Lisa Zeeveld:

But neither kept a lot of things from my childhood, so I don’t have like Barbies or old clothes or any of that.

Tricia Sciortino:

Your kindergarten diploma.

Lisa Zeeveld:

No, they got rid of that stuff long before and then my husband, Michael, his mom was also not someone that kept a lot of things. She had one box of Michael’s stuff from when he was a child and that was it. And so I think when we got married and we, and I mean, I like moving now because I did it as a kid, I’m conditioned to like change, I’m conditioned to like moving. And so as we started to build our own family, we just did the same thing. So I’ve had to be really conscious about saving things for my children, because it’s so ingrained in me not to save it. That I’m also, I’m a little of afraid that I might get rid of too much. Now they’re older and so now I can actually ask them those questions like, “Hey, does this bear actually mean anything to you?” And they can say yes or no, but yeah, that’s interesting that you shared that.

Tricia Sciortino:

See, great little tidbit about LZ. So I can see how it leads into this whole conversation, a little bit, talking about why you’re are so passionate about helping people develop as professionals and leaders. And so I know your background and your history plays into all that, but I’d love you to share why you are.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. I mean, I think, like I shared earlier, number one is I really do love people and I want to respect people for who they are and I want to meet them for where they are. Because again, as the new girl, as the outsider, I’ve talked about it before in my TED Talk, I was the redhead with freckles who was picked on, I was poor growing up, it was all the things that made for a really good joke. And so I was always the butt of all the jokes and so being the butt of all the jokes, it really helps you understand how vulnerable people are and what it feels like to be on the opposite side of that. So I think that just generally I care a lot about people because I know what they’re feeling, I feel so much what other people feel and I want to help them.

Lisa Zeeveld:

How that translates into being a leader and a professional is I think that we’re all wandering through life, trying to make other people feel like we have it all together and we know what we’re doing and that the crux of it all, we don’t know what we’re doing. Most of us are going through life blindly and I think that that goes to leadership too. I think that you start to work hard and people recognize that you have great work ethic and that you’re talented and so they put you in positions where you start to lead people. But at the core of it, you’re still a person who brings all of that hurt, all that joy, all that happiness, all the things of who you are as a person, you bring that into your leadership.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And so I don’t think that it’s, in most organization, there’s a lot of thought that goes into helping someone be a great leader. And so they end up leading from their own self and that’s not always a good place. Now, BELAY, we do a fantastic job of that. I know you and I have said that time and time again, how much we’ve grown, because BELAY has poured into us with coaches and leadership talent, but I don’t think most people have that opportunity. And so I just want to give back everything that I’ve learned over my 20, some years in leadership.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. I love that. And you do, it’s really at the core of who you are, the give back, the mentorship component of how you show up as a leader. Would you say that’s one of the main obstacles that leaders face in their development? Is it a lack of mentorship or what would you say are the main obstacles you see when you’re working with mentees?

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. I definitely think it’s a lack of guidance, I think it can be mentorship. I happen to really value mentorship because I value relationships and I think that it’s easier to go to somebody and be like, “Hey, I’m struggling with this,” and have somebody that you value or revere speak into your life, but I think overall a good blanket term would just be guidance. I mean, again, if you look at, thinking back to maybe your first job at retail or fast food, you start as a hourly employee, maybe part-time and then you have some freedom and maybe you become full time and then there’s enough movement in those type of environments. So they need a manager well, you could be a manager because you did so good working on the floor.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And they might teach you how to work on schedules and maybe understanding the basic accounting, but they don’t really spend a lot of time with you understanding number one, how to lead people, but number two, also how to help your own career. And so I think that for me, it’s really important when you grow leaders, not just to promote somebody into a leadership role, but really spend time with them and help them understand what it means to be a leader. It’s not just to corral the team members, it’s not just to get them all on the same page, but at the end of the day, I want people to leave my leadership and say that I helped them become a better leader and a better person. But that takes time.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, absolutely. That’s not like, here read this book, read this training manual, it’s not a hard skillset by any means, it’s an investment.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. And one that you may as the leader who is encouraging and guiding one, you may actually not see fully under your leadership. I mean, because the idea is that you’re building leaders who will go out and build other leaders and that may be within your organization and it may not be within your organization.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. And I think we have the ability to affect people who we don’t even work with in a leadership or guidance capacity, which is even more fascinating. Yeah. And so I know you’re a big proponent of emotional intelligence and its importance in the role of a healthy leader. So talk to us a little bit about EQ.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. Well, I have to give some credit to Dr. Scott Livingston. He was a client of BELAY and through getting to know him, I learned a lot about it and of course, have read tons of books and have worked with Scott personally and professionally to really understand emotional intelligence. And now it’s like this, I feel like it’s almost like my buzzword in my vocabulary, you walk by somebody, please tell me I’m not the only person who’s an armchair psychologist, I’ll be at a restaurant, well, that person could really use some more EQ, oh my gosh. So it could be good and bad, but I think that it really, the crux of emotional intelligence is helping you understand how you show up. And I think that when we start to understand how we show up, we can better understand how our leadership affects others.

Tricia Sciortino:

Or what’s driving, what’s behind why we show up that way, emotionally like triggers, understanding your triggers and what presses your button and then how you react to the button.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. And I think that then you start to understand personality conflicts within your own team. I think that you can see why maybe you have a harder time connecting with one person because you just don’t know how to read the room. Emotional intelligence, I think at the end of the day can be summed up as, you’re just really not understanding how to read the room and how you show up in the room. And so I think there’s so many times when people, and again, that’s another skill I get off on another soapbox talking about like, why don’t we teach this stuff in schools? We should be teaching everybody this, but it’s so important that you don’t walk in and become the awkward turtle of a situation or leading a team because you don’t happen to know that your own insecurities are showing up in a way that makes other people feel like you’re not a very strong leader. And then you’re wondering why you can’t get people to do the things you want them to do.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Oh, well, it’s because you show up this way and unless you’re willing to invest the time and understanding yourself and how other people perceive you, then I don’t think that you can grow as a leader. And I think then you’re capped in your potential.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. Because when you lose influence over your team, you’ve lost the ability to lead them well, you lose effectiveness as a leader if you diminish the respect you have in the room, honestly, by how you show up or whatever.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Totally, and it’s not about changing, you and I spend a lot of time talking about this, it’s not about changing who you are, emotional intelligence is just about understanding who you are. So you can be a very emotional person who feels a lot of things and you want to feel, I mean, I just talked about that myself, I feel for people, I’m empathetic, but I also know that that’s not, that I have to minimize that reaction or tailor that, maybe a reaction that I might have, so that it doesn’t come across as that I’m making emotional decisions or that I can’t handle something when it’s hard. And so I think it’s just learning how to take those feelings and modify them in the situation that you are. Again, you still have them, they’re still a part of who you are, but it’s just how you’re showing up with all of them. And that’s what is key to me on emotional intelligence, it’s not about labels or changing yourself, it’s just modifying that behavior over time.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. Know thy self first.

Tricia Sciortino:

If you are anything like me, then keeping up with the daily tasks of AR, AP and account reconciliation are not your favorite things, but you also know how necessary and important it is. The good news is it doesn’t have to be your thing anymore. BELAY can help.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Numbers are totally my thing Tricia, and thankfully numbers are BELAY Bookkeepers thing too. Our sponsor BELAY believes you deserve top notch bookkeepers to produce balance sheets, pay bills, reconcile bank and credit card statements and monthly reports to keep you up to date on the numbers of your organization. Whether you’re a church, nonprofit or a business, they have the right people ready to help. Talk to their team today and never lose sleep over your financials again. Get started by visiting belaysolutions.com/services/bookkeepers today.

Tricia Sciortino:

So when a leader feels unequipped or stuck, what would be the first thing you’d recommend they do or steps they take?

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. I mean, I think that you need to find the right guide, whether that’s a person, I think that we identify with other people because people look like you, that it’s easy to model after that. And so I think that finding somebody that, a guide to either help walk you through it, is great or at least writing it down, writing the plan down, I think is the first step in feeling stuck. I also think that you have to understand and spend time, and this so scary and I’ve actually been doing this myself recently on just some other areas that I noticed are gaps in my life. And so I can actually speak the truth into this, it’s scary to sit alone by yourself with a piece of paper and to go, why am I feeling why I’m feeling?

Lisa Zeeveld:

And I think that when someone is stuck in leadership, maybe they’re not advancing to the leadership position they want, maybe they’re in a leadership position that they don’t want, there’s a lot of reasons for it. But I think that you need to sit down and start with an inventory of why am I here and why am I feeling this way? And then creating a guide around that or looking for someone to help you in a guide, and that could be a mentor. And then you start to model what you see, you start customizing your approach to it, and ultimately you put down some real goals that you can follow through and measure yourself by, in order to get you from A to B.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. And what I find fascinating too, I love that, and I know you are an advocate of this and do it yourself personally, is typically when you tell somebody, what are your goals? Write down your goals. What they usually send you is a to-do list, like, I’m going to, it’s probably a list of things that a leader thinks they should go do, because that’s going to make them a better leader and where you see gaps is, but how do these goals advance you or unlock your leadership potential? Do any of these point back to literal personal and professional development? Not like, yes, okay, if your goal is to get some kind of certification and that’s going to help you in your career, of course those things make sense. But if you have a gap in stage fright or something, I don’t represent well on stage.

Tricia Sciortino:

And so you might have a goal that is something you should improve, but the how, the why, the what, the how are you improving yourself as a person? Not checking off a bunch of to do items on a list that becomes goals. Anyway, it’s something I’ve seen in goal gaps so many times, and I’d love to know specifically from you, if you were to suggest three things, three tools, three actions, three opportunities, for somebody listening, who feels like they have potential that they’re not recognizing, what would you recommend or suggest they do to take steps in the right direction for themselves.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. Well, I want to go back to what you were just talking about in the goal gaps too. So I think that, and you and I have seen this time and time again, I’m sure this is going to get a reaction out of you, when people want to be a leader because either they just want to help people, I just want to help people, I want to lead people. Or they do it because they want the classic, we’re going to call it a virtual fancy office, the glass office, the corner glass office that everybody wants. So often people, well, I want to become a better leader because I want to lead people better or because I want that office and they don’t focus it on themselves. And so their goals are very externally focused, so like I’m going to become a better leader so I can become VP. Well, to me, that’s very externally focused.

Tricia Sciortino:

It’s also the opposite. You are going to come VP because you are a better leader.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes. Or I’m going to work on my leadership because I love people and I want to help people. Well, that’s great, but you have to help them reach your company’s goals. I love people, I just said that, but I’m a leader because ultimately I’m here to help the business grow, which has this phenomenal effect on helping other people grow too. So I just wanted to clarify that, so I think that when I talk a lot about goals, people just make them these very odd goals. And so when we’re talking about unlocking a leader’s potential, it’s about their potential, it’s not about a job title, it’s not about helping people, again, it’s all at external things. I think it goes back to, they have to work on their emotional intelligence, they have to know how other people perceive them.

Lisa Zeeveld:

One of the best questions that we have been taught to ask is, what does it feel like to be on the other side of me? It’s basically like a 365 evaluation or 360 evaluation, what does it feel like to be on the other side of me? And when you start to ask those questions, you get a glimpse into emotional intelligence. So I think that you need to understand your emotional intelligence. I also think that you need to work on relationships, this can be really hard, especially right now in today’s climate to go out and network and get to know people, but relationships matter. You actually do have to value people if you’re going to be a great leader and you have to value people-

Tricia Sciortino:

You’re not climbing to the top, you’re not elevating with nobody around you, you don’t rise alone, you just don’t, you can’t. Yeah.

Lisa Zeeveld:

No. So you need a great support system, you actually need people who are going to advocate for you. I’m a big believer when I mentor women one on one, I always say that they need to find somebody who was going to speak their name in a really good way in environments when they’re not around. So you need an advocate who will go, oh my gosh, Tricia, you’re not here, but I’m with a group of people and I’m going, oh my gosh, she’s the most amazing person ever, you need people in your life to say that. So you need to work on relationships with people who can be your advocate, you also need to work on relationships with the people you’re going to lead because you have to understand that you’re going to be leading people who aren’t like you and that can be hard sometimes because they’re going to different interests, they’re going to respond to things differently and you have to show up and lead them well anyway.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And then lastly, you have to work on your skill set. So if you have a skill gap, then you have to be smart enough to know where to go get that additional education or training so that you can rise above that, depending upon what type of leadership position you’re in, if you’re more of a manager or director, you’re probably going to be more hands on. And so it’s going to be important for you to have a skill, to do that hands on work, as you rise to VP and executive, it’s going to really be about your strategy and your vision. And that’s not easy for everybody. I mean, we have seen leaders who aren’t able to advance because they don’t have those two components right there. And so I think leaning into that is very helpful.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. It’s hard. I don’t think people realize, the further up the ladder you go, you move through these different progressive seasons where, at lower level, you’re more of a doer, then at management you become a driver of things. And then as an executive you will become a visionary, a dreamer, a vision caster. And it’s very different to be a doer than it is to be a vision caster and I know because I went through this evolution in my leadership journey, you were there alongside me where I am a doer, I’m a doer, I love do. It all started and I love to drive, but I had to learn, I had to teach myself because it was important for me because I wanted to get to the next level that I had to learn how to stop being the doer and be the vision caster.

Tricia Sciortino:

And those are very soft, fluffy skill sets, but there’s complete control of mine in teaching myself to make that shift. And I knew if I remained the doer, then I will be forever the doer, I cannot be the leader and the doer, I’ve got to teach, I got to hold myself accountable for letting go of the doing and teach myself because it’s my responsibility, how to be a vision caster and a visionary leader. It’s nobody else’s responsibility, not yours, not my bosses, not the organizations, it’s mine, it’s completely my responsibility.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. And I think that one of the key areas we have seen as people have moved on their leadership journey is it’s usually the person who’s like, I’m so busy, and you go, oh, okay, well, can you tell me what you’re doing? And a lot of times they’re doing something.

Tricia Sciortino:

A list of things they shouldn’t be doing, that’s what they’re doing.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes. And so there are times when we have this very painful time tracking exercise that we’ve all done at one time or another, but it’s so eyeopening because then you start to write it down. If you are at the position where you’re a VP or executive, or just somebody who’s been directed to cast a vision and think strategically in your business, and yet you are still working on spreadsheets or you are the order filler or whatever your job is. And yet you don’t have time to think strategically and to cast the vision, that’s when you know that your priorities are messed up and you need to find someone to delegate that to. But it’s usually a clear warning sign when someone’s like, oh my gosh, I’m drowning. Okay. What you’re working on? Tell me what you’re working on.

Tricia Sciortino:

Because at the end of the day you want your really good leaders to not be executors. And so if they’re executing on things, there’s a reset that needs to be done there, for their accountability, for their potential for you as their leader, even. Yeah. I love that very much. So it’s been said that everyone is a leader in their own way and it’s true. We all in our very own way are leaders, but in terms of leading people, how could somebody know if that’s right for them? Leading people, we’ve had a lot of people we’ve seen through leadership academies that we do here at BELAY where people want to be a leader and then you put them through a leadership academy, turns out that’s not actually for them. And so what would you say to someone who thinks they want to be a leader, but is that actually what they really want?

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. I mean, I think there’s a whole list of things, the first thing that popped into my mind right now is accountability and it goes on both sides. It is somebody who can keep others accountable, but that they can also keep themselves accountable.

Tricia Sciortino:

That is the word, the, in my opinion, that is the word right there, accountability. You can’t hold, if you’re not comfortable with accountability, it’s going to be really hard to be a leader.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes. It’s so hard because what we find is that usually if you have a hard time keeping yourself accountable, you definitely can’t keep other people accountable. And if you’ve been able to squeak by and make people think that you can keep yourself accountable, it definitely shows up when you go to keep others accountable. And we’ve seen this time and time again here at BELAY, where they love people so much, this goes back to what I said before, when people are like, I want to be a leader because I love people and I want to help them. And then they start leading people and then all of a sudden that team’s KPIs, I mean, just are horrible. Or they’re not following through and so there’s missed deadlines, like oh, well, I mean, I told them that they had to get it done and yeah, but did you follow up with them? Did you have strict deadlines?

Lisa Zeeveld:

It’s all because leading people is difficult, like I just said, they’re going to be people with different personalities, different back rounds, different cultures, they’re not maybe going to look or sound like you and you’ve got to lead them. You got to know how to encourage them, motivate them and so it’s not for the faint of heart, but at its core, you have to do what you promise. You actually have to follow through on what your promises were and sometimes you’ve just made promises for a team that you’re going to be held accountable for and so you have to keep those team members accountable for it.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yes, absolutely.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Because poop rolls uphill.

Tricia Sciortino:

It does in leadership land, does in leadership, yes. Thank you for the edit. And my final remarks, also are, we’ve all heard the phrasing, poop goes uphill, and praise and encouragement usually does not. And so you’ve also heard the phrase, it’s lonely at the top, and the truth is it very well can be. And so deciding to lead is really a very self-sacrificing decision because you are literally putting what is best for an organization and the people inside of it before anything else. And it comes with a lot of judgment and persecution potentially, and disagreement, everybody’s never going to agree with every decision you make as a leader or every word you say. And at the end of the day, if things like that will get to you, you’ll be heartbroken. And so you really have to have tough skin and understand that leadership is really a sacrifice.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah, no, I mean, there’s a microscope really that shines upon you, a magnifying glass, and from what you wear, I know this happens a lot in church leadership, from what you wear to what you drive, to your home, to how you sound, the word choices you make, how you show up on stage, how you shake somebody’s hand, do you embrace them? Do you not embrace them? Every single thing you do is scrutinized. And so I love that you brought that up because I think that a lot of folks don’t understand the pressure. It’s not just that responsibility is the pressure of it, like your decision making, but the pressure on how you’re viewed by others is tough.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. Is it is definitely not for the faint at heart.

Lisa Zeeveld:

No.

Tricia Sciortino:

Well, thank you. I’ve loved this conversation.

Lisa Zeeveld:

So fun. This is so much, oh, wait, before we go.

Tricia Sciortino:

Oh yes.

Lisa Zeeveld:

It’s not an episode unless I ask you what you got from this, because I think that you bring so much also to this conversation because you pour so much into other people, and I know that. One of the things that you love to do is to build leaders and you’ve done that phenomenally well here at BELAY and in your past life. So what, maybe not a takeaway, but what is one more thing that you would tell folks maybe who are listening and who are trying to figure out if leadership is right for them or if they’re unstuck, just I don’t know, maybe a nugget for them that maybe I didn’t hit on.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. Well, I would say, I’ll just build off what you said and my takeaway from this conversation truly is the value of outside perspective. So it is great to work with people that you can have honest dialogue and conversation with and you can bounce idea is off of. But when you think through the idea of who is your guide and who speaks into your leadership and your life, really having a third party outside perspective to me is so important. We’ve had the opportunity to work with mentors and coaches and so I would say, if you’re serious about your leadership journey, find somebody you don’t work with to counsel you and invest in you. And I feel like you hit on that in all of it, and I know you do that personally for other people, but for me, that’s a big one is that I feel like, I’ve felt and recognized growth in my life through the coaching and the opportunities I’ve been presented that are people even outside of my day to day, because they really have a completely different filter and perspective on how they can challenge you.

Tricia Sciortino:

And so that’s my takeaway is that, I believe in coaching and mentoring and the value that it brings to somebody who’s on a leadership journey.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. Perfect. Great way to end Tricia, love it.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yay. So now I get to steal your lines. As always guys, we have a download for you so you can take your one next step. And this week’s download is actually the link to Lisa’s TED Talk, she can say she’s TED Talk famous, I may not, take a listen guys. It’s a good one, it’s full of excellent nuggets. I hope you love it. If you want the link to her TED Talk, please text the phrase one next step to 31996, or visit onenextsteppodcast.com and you’ll get access to the resource so that you can keep moving forward. So thank you for joining us and join us next week for more practical tips and actionable tools to advance your business one step at a time.

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s right. So start by making today count.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Hey guys, you don’t want to miss next week’s episode, we switch things up a little and I get the pleasure of interviewing Tricia. She will share a little more of her story and talk about ways we can stop self doubt and become a more confident leader. Here’s a clip from our conversation.

Tricia Sciortino:

I have this insatiable belief, maybe it’s because of how I was raised that we can do anything, I can do anything, no one can stop you, no one can stop me. I really did believe, I mean, even in the seasons where I felt like maybe I was kicked down and I was told, no, that’s not going to happen for you. Of course, you sit there for a minute, you recognize the self-doubt and then you have to just pick yourself up and say, “I’m going to call bullshit on that.” There’s nothing I can’t do.

Speaker 2:

Thanks for listening to One Next Step. Be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or follow us on Spotify. Then join us next time for more practical business tips and tools to help you get more done, grow your business and lead your team with confidence. For more episodes, show notes, and helpful resources, visit onenextsteppodcast.com.

Subscribe to One Next Step & Start Doing Small Business Big

Apple Podcasts

Spotify

Google Podcasts

Stitcher