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How to Implement What You Learn from Business Books

 This week’s download is from Bryan and his team at Stroke of Genius to help you start getting the most from the content you read. It recaps the WIT framework he shared with us during this episode.

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About This Episode

If you’ve ever searched for business books on Amazon, you know the choices are almost unlimited. Where do you even start?

 

In this episode, Lisa and BELAY’s Director of Marketing, Amy Appleton, are joined by Bryan Kelly, a strategic advisor, investor, and founder of Stroke of Genius. His Stroke of Genius program provides busy leaders with key ideas to execute from popular business books. Today, he’ll chat about how leaders and readers can identify the right books for them, then quickly identify and retain the advice they need to become better leaders.

1. We write to remember, but we remember because we write.

This is important to think about when you are reading a book. Actively taking notes, whether it’s in the margins or in a separate journal, helps solidify the information in your mind. You’re much more likely to remember something you’ve written down versus simply highlighting it or taking note of it in your mind.

2. Know the difference between creating demand and capturing demand.

Those who create demand are in tune to their customers’ needs. They understand the customer and their problems and can directly respond to them. Those who capture demand rely more on brand agnostic consumers and usually focus on the “scraps” left over from demand creators via Google, etc to sell their product or service.

3. Be open to hearing honest feedback about your idea during market research.

If they don’t like what you offer, dig in and find out why. When it comes to your consumers or potential consumers, every answer is a right answer. It’s there for a reason. It’s your job to understand why they feel the way they do so you can better answer their needs in the future – or simply understand that it’s just not a good fit. 

 

How would you describe product differentiation?
How do you think your product or service stands out from your competitors?
What could you do better to differentiate?
Do you believe your strategy is more about capturing demand or creating demand?

We write to remember, but we remember because we write.

Bryan Kelly

If you're able to be curious, go in with no other objective than just to learn.

Chris Walker

Focus on what gaps exist in the market and understand what problems you are solving.

Chris Walker

No matter what answer the customer gives you, it's the right answer.

Chris Walker

(02:40) Bryan answers the question, “What’s one book you wish you would have thought of to write?”

(03:45) Bryan talks about his background and how he got to where he is with Stroke of Genius. 

(07:28) Bryan explains his WIT framework (Writing. Imagery. Talking)

(09:56) “We write to remember, but we remember because we write.” It’s very important to take notes while reading. 

(13:38) 80% of our brains are dedicated to processing images, and those images trigger emotions. 

(15:44) The person who does the teaching and the talking is the person who is learning the most. 

(16:58) Comprehension is built by 1) reading it. 2) thinking about it. 3) restating it in our own words. 

(20:36) How do you put the WIT framework into practice?

(22:10) Bryan’s program helps you understand the 3-5 things you need to understand from the business books they cover. 

(27:19) If you can picture an image of what you’re reading in your mind, it really will help you remember it more. Drawing a quick sketch is even better. 

(28:03) Lisa talks about her difficulty with audio books and needing to go back to the physical book and highlight a phrase for her to remember it. 

(28:51) This week’s download is from Bryan and his team at Stroke of Genius to help you start getting the most from the content you read. It recaps the WIT framework he shared with us during this episode.

Bryan Kelly:

A mentor of mine once told me, “We write to remember, but we remember because we write.” So it’s very important to be diligent about taking notes while reading. The brain science basically says that when we write, it stimulates our memory first and foremost. So it activates all different parts of our brain that we don’t use when we read.

Speaker 2:

Welcome to One Next Step, the most practical business podcast in the world. Helping you get more done, grow your business and lead your team with confidence with tips and tools you didn’t get in business school. Here are your hosts, Tricia Sciortino and Lisa Zeeveld.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Welcome to One Next Step, the practical business podcast that helps you run your business so it stops running you. I’m LZ. Today, we’re going to talk about a really unique topic that is, how to quickly identify the best content most applicable to you and your organization from business books. Guys, I know we have a ton of them, I’ve got a stack on my desk right now. Then we want to efficiently implement those ideas into your life and your work.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Before we introduce today’s guest, let me bring in my co-host for today, the fabulous Amy Appleton, Belay’s director of marketing.

Amy Appleton:

Hey, everyone, I’m pumped to be here today and to introduce you to today’s guest Bryan Kelly. Bryan Kelly is a strategic advisor, investor and founder of Stroke of Genius. His Stroke of Genius program provides busy leaders with the key ideas to execute from popular business books.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah, you’ve always heard the saying, “Leaders are readers.” How many memes and GIFs have been made about that? Well today, Bryan is going to show us why that is so true and how to be extremely efficient in pulling the best information from what you read. This is information that will not only help us as leaders, but also help our team members grow too. So, so super important. So you know what? Let’s get started with Bryan Kelly.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Welcome Bryan. We are so excited that you are here to join us today.

Bryan Kelly:

Yeah, thank you. I’m actually a big fan of the show. I’ve listened to quite a number of episodes. Although somehow I’ve managed to miss the ones that Amy’s been the host or co-host.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Now you have some homework.

Amy Appleton:

You do, you have some homework to do right after this.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. Well, we always love to start out with sort of a fun question. So maybe these are questions that folks who’ve heard your podcast and seen your content before might not know about you. So are you ready? Are you ready for your fun question of the day? Okay.

Bryan Kelly:

I’m ready.

Lisa Zeeveld:

What’s one book you wish you had thought of to write?

Bryan Kelly:

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Oh, good answer.

Amy Appleton:

Oh, that is a good answer.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And what a phenomenal story, right?

Bryan Kelly:

Yeah. That’s the one that kicked it all off and started a massive career for J.K. Rowling. So I figured, “Why not? That would be a great one. If I wrote that, maybe I would have had the same success.”

Amy Appleton:

You would have a movie empire and a book empire, so it would be great.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes. And a theme park.

Bryan Kelly:

Right.

Amy Appleton:

And a theme park.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And a theme park. I love theme parks, so that would… And like I said, she’s got such a great story. I will always love kind of the underdog. And so I think we would just hear her talk about her journey. It’s so inspiring and encouraging all at the same time.

Bryan Kelly:

I agree.

Amy Appleton:

Well, Bryan, like I said, we are so excited to have you today. You’ve got some great things that you’re going to share with us. To get started, just tell us about your background and how you got to where you are with Stroke of Genius.

Bryan Kelly:

Sure. Well, I started my first business when I was in my mid-20s and that quickly grew into a seven figure operation, and later on down the road sold that business. Then I went into the software industry, I was an executive at an enterprise software company, and during the time that I was there, we tripled the revenue for that business and then sold it to private equity. So that’s kind of the highlights. There’s all sorts of nuances and little details I could get into, but they’re probably not relevant to our conversation. It’s done some really interesting things and been involved in some cool stuff.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. I love that. I’m going to go back and maybe a little off track here, but what was the first business?

Bryan Kelly:

Well, before we started recording, we were talking about architecture in Chicago, which is my hometown and the business that I had, we were the first licensee of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. And actually not the first, we were the youngest licensees of the Franklin Wright Foundation. So we would take designs from their archives that Franklin Wright had in different houses and create things like home decor products, artwork for the walls, we had stencils, we had vases and all sorts of stuff. We started with that niche of like Frank Lloyd Wright’s kind of the museum world. And then we launched a few other product lines kind of off the back of that, they were interesting to our Franklin Wright audience, but a little bit broader appeal and we ended up in stores like Room & Board or Crate & Barrel and things like that.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Wow. Okay, we have so much to talk about after the show but that’s awesome. That is awesome. Especially coming from, I like how you touched on that when you started college, this would not be the trajectory that you would have seen yourself on. And so I think that’s probably really resonates with a lot of our listeners out there. I’ve got a college-age son. Amy does as well.

Amy Appleton:

I have a daughter.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. And so, it’s so hard sometimes for people to think, “Oh, I’m going to go to school to get this one degree and I’m going to do this thing forever,” and you kind of took that and said, “Well, this is what I have my degree in. I don’t have the necessary skills I need to kind of go to the next place that I really think that I am best suited for, but I’m going to read and I’m going to learn,” and you were such a giver that you said, “I’m going to teach other people how to do that.” Phenomenal, I love that.

Bryan Kelly:

Yeah. Well, I get excited. My wife sometimes is like, “You’re sharing too much information, people don’t care about that.” But when I’m passionate about something, I love to share. It works out really well with the program to be able to help people get to the core of what’s going to be most important and relevant to them.

Amy Appleton:

I also like it because it shows the many journeys that you’ve actually been on, right? In terms of sometimes I think it’s easy when someone has a program, you’ve read a lot of business books that you’re like, “Oh, okay.” But what I hear is there’s so much diversity in your background of the different things that you’ve done and then being able to apply, knowing that it can apply regardless of the business for the industry that you’re in.

Bryan Kelly:

Yeah, that’s so true.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And, Amy, I think that’s why what resonates with both you and I because that’s our background. It’s like we try all these different things and yet it makes us such great leaders because we’re able to pull from all those different experiences. It’s not just one lane that we’ve always kind of stuck to. I think that’s the best leaders overall.

Amy Appleton:

Exactly.

Lisa Zeeveld:

So would you be willing to share with us your three-part-framework?

Bryan Kelly:

My secrets?

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes, you said your wife always says you share too much. So right now don’t listen to her, share, share, share.

Bryan Kelly:

All right. The framework is really simple. I kind of have it as a three-part system. The first, and actually I call it WIT, which is W-I-T, it’s fun

Lisa Zeeveld:

You’re a witty guy.

Amy Appleton:

Witty?

Bryan Kelly:

Yeah. But wit is essentially defined as something like mental sharpness, which I thought was appropriate. And so the W in the WIT framework stands for writing. I is imagery, and then the T is teaching.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Okay.

Bryan Kelly:

So those are kind of three key actions that as you’re consuming content today, we’re talking specifically about books, but really any kind of content is focused on writing, focused on imagery and focused on teaching. So I’m going to break all that down and kind of extrapolate on each of those three parts.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Okay.

Bryan Kelly:

Actually, before we get into the three parts and defining those in more detail. I’ve got this framework, I think I shared this with, with your team, but I have a download that goes through specifically the three parts of the framework.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Bryan Kelly:

So if your listeners are curious and want to have that as a reference tool its a PDF, they can download and they can get that on my site at getstrokeofgenius.com/belay.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Awesome.

Amy Appleton:

Excellent. Thank you.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And I think we’re going to link that in the show notes as well.

Bryan Kelly:

Awesome. It’s something I created for myself and I keep it close at hand when I’m going through the process of reading a book that I want to really get a lot of the meat extracted from so that I can take action on it. So let’s talk about this first part of the framework, which is writing.

Bryan Kelly:

Writing is super foundational and that’s why it’s kind of the first part of this framework. I know a lot of people have talked about this in different books. Other authors have highlighted this, it’s become popular kind of on the circuit so to speak. But it’s really important because it sets up the next two pieces, which I’m going to share and are less known by most people.

Bryan Kelly:

So a mentor of mine once told me, he said, “We write to remember, but we remember because we write.” So it’s very important to be diligent about taking notes while reading. And the brain science basically says that when we write, it stimulates our memory first and foremost. So it activates all different parts of our brain that we don’t use when we read. So it engages the brain more fully instead of this partially. And that the reason is that the brain stores information differently so that it’s more accessible later.

Lisa Zeeveld:

So me highlighting in my book is probably not the right thing.

Amy Appleton:

Does that count?

Bryan Kelly:

It helps you, so you can go back and write the notes based on that later.

Amy Appleton:

Okay.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Oh, okay. Good to know, good to know.

Bryan Kelly:

It’s part A of a two part sequence. But the next thing that’s really important is that writing is what they call kinesthetic. So it’s really the physical act of moving the pen across the page that makes writing a better learning strategy than just reading alone. Again, it’s tidying this idea that the interaction between the brain and the hand helps cement what we’re learning.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Sure.

Amy Appleton:

Sure.

Bryan Kelly:

And then the last thing that brain sciences revealed about this is that writing is what they describe as visual spatial. And this means that we remember where we write. We get this mental image, like this location of specific bits of information that you see on the page, when you think about it. In a minute, we’ll talk about imagery, but the addition of visual cues, things like icons or shapes or connecting lines, all that good stuff, those all create a mental image of the content that we’re consuming that we’re reading.

Bryan Kelly:

So again, that helps make it more memorable, helps it stick in our brain. And it’s kind of that first foundational layer that helps us really get the most out of what we’re reading, as opposed to skimming. Skimming has its place in a process of reading so you can kind of get a sense for what’s coming, see if it’s like, “Is this really even in line with what is important to me?” But when you’re really trying to get the most out of that content, this first part of writing.

Bryan Kelly:

So this is kind of a good example, close your eyes. For those of you listening on the podcast, your eyes don’t need to be closed because you can’t see me. I’m going to say a few words and visualize these: Mickey Mouse, ocean waves, best friend, night sky, first love, an ice cream. All right, open your eyes.

Lisa Zeeveld:

That was quite a trip.

Bryan Kelly:

I know, right?

Lisa Zeeveld:

I know.

Bryan Kelly:

Very, very stimulating words and phrases, but I’m sure as you were closing your eyes and listening to me say those words that images popped in your head for sure.

Amy Appleton:

Right. Immediately.

Bryan Kelly:

Yeah. It’s natural for our brain to kind of populate our mind with images that it recalls that it associates with those words. And the really interesting thing is that 80% of our brain is actually dedicated to processing visuals. It’s immensely important for our brain immensely important for our learning. And again, if we can accentuate the consumption of content specifically, when we’re reading a book by incorporating imagery, that’s going to help us further understand and retain that information.

Bryan Kelly:

So the first kind of reason that brain science researchers have kind of explained that this is why this is why this is important, is that images engage the brain. In fact, I think they say that six parts of the brain are dedicated towards being able to process a visual, basically. So simply put, we pay way more attention to visuals than anything else.

Bryan Kelly:

The second thing is the brain science says that we are triggered or the images basically trigger long-term memory. And the reality is really that it’s triggering emotion. So again those words that I gave in that example, like there was probably a strong emotion tied to each of those things. And the brain is biologically wired to pay attention to information that has a strong emotional connection. So it just, it wakes up, it pays attention. And when we pay attention that deepens our learning that embeds it further into our mind.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Sure.

Bryan Kelly:

Now, I did mention earlier the PDF that listeners can download.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes.

Amy Appleton:

Right, yeah.

Bryan Kelly:

It’s a visually engaging sketchnote. It’s a more polished version than what I would do. Actually, I work with an artist who is really good. And so it’s a sketch note of the three concepts in the WIT framework. It’s a good example of what I’m describing here, it’s just a very simple images we combine with that text. The key idea is that you’re distilling from your notes.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. Okay, great.

Amy Appleton:

All right.

Bryan Kelly:

All right, so we’ve got one more part left.

Lisa Zeeveld:

The T.

Amy Appleton:

T.

Bryan Kelly:

Talking. I did say teaching before. Teaching and talking are interchangeable, sometimes I swap those out. And the reason is that the person who does the teaching or the talking is really the person that is learning the most.

Amy Appleton:

Right.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Sure.

Bryan Kelly:

So when you think about a teacher, whether we’re talking of a classroom environment or even a business setting where maybe you’re teaching a skill set to a small group of employees or your team, you know the most about that thing, right?

Bryan Kelly:

And the more that you talk about it, the more that it becomes ingrained in your brain, which is how you learned it in the first place. But those that are listening, like it’s new to them, it’s foreign. They’re like, “Wait, what? Can you show that again? I’m not understanding.” So that’s really the thing that I encourage a lot of people is, “Flip that around, really think about how you can get those people engaged in what you’re teaching them because that will help them.” So that’s writing, that’s using imagery and that’s talking. So when we focus on this particular piece of it, the thing that is most important to understand is that talking increases the retention. So when we’re explaining something that we’ve just learned, for example, this is kind of similar to what I was saying with writing notes is that we process it three times.

Bryan Kelly:

It’s first when we read it, that’s number one, second is when we think about it, and then the third and final pass at it is when we restate it in our own words. So three times we’re going through our comprehension of what that information is. And each step we get deeper and deeper with the comprehension. So how do we talk, right? That’s probably the question that’s in your mind is, “Great. What’s an example?” It’s super simple. I do this when I go with my wife on a walk each day, we go for about an hour, hour 15 minute walk every morning. And I will just relay to her the things that I had just read, whether that be from a book, whether that be from an article or something interesting.

Bryan Kelly:

And it helps me again, internalize what does this actually mean? Can I explain it to somebody else? It just is like that process of internalizing it, sharing it with somebody else, and most importantly, getting feedback from that other person.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Sure, yeah.

Bryan Kelly:

So because then my wife will ask me clarifying questions about like, “Well, does that mean that such and such?” And I’ll be like, “You’re right. Actually I didn’t explain that properly, but yeah, that’s a good point that you make.” Or helps me really just kind of bounce that kind of volleying back and forth through the conversation of what this really means. And also getting that additional perspective from somebody is really helpful.

Tricia:

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Lisa Zeeveld:

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Lisa Zeeveld:

It’s kind of like when I’m learning something new, a lot of times I’ll repeat it back, right? Like, “I heard you saying this, or can I regurgitate that to you so I know that I haven’t missed any details?” The process I’ve already written it down, but by me talking to them, I’m also cementing it in my brain as well.

Bryan Kelly:

Yeah. It’s huge. A lot of us do that in those certain settings where we’re having those conversations where we don’t think to do it when we read.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah.

Bryan Kelly:

Again, it’s we treat reading oftentimes like it’s a very passive activity. But these three things combined or stacked together, as you’re going through reading a book, really help undergird the retention that you’ll have with that information.

Amy Appleton:

Perfect. And that makes so much sense as you’re kind of walking through each of those three pieces of the framework on probably all of our listeners are thinking of their personal experience in each one of those and then how it’s tying it all back together. So we’d love to hear, how does that play forward with Stroke of Genius? So we have the three pieces of the framework and then our audience is… Everyone’s like, “This is fantastic.” But when I get to that actionable item, how do I pull then that actionable item out of the book through the reading and the note taking and the imagery piece?

Bryan Kelly:

Well, the great thing is with this framework, obviously anybody can use it and apply it. It’s incredibly helpful. It’s helped me quite a bit over the years to be able to take information that I’ve learned in book and apply it. With Stroke of Genius we kind of circumvent a lot of that through the program is we basically say, “Look, here’s a distillation of the content from this book by all means, read the book if you don’t have time for it, or you’re just kind of curious, here’s essentially the summary.” So similar to what you get in a lot of other book summary type products or solutions, but it gives you like a chapter by chapter breakdown. Like here’s the big idea, here’s the key thing from this chapter, boom, boom, boom. So in 15 minutes you can read that summary to be like, “Okay, I understand kind of the big concepts of this book.” So we make that shorter and easier for folks in our program. The thing that is really important beyond that, like that’s just kind of like the administrative side of getting the information.

Bryan Kelly:

The next thing that we focus on is say, “Look, here’s the three to five things that you need to understand from this book.” Like the concepts that you can take action on. We’ve kind of vetted it out. We’ve gone through this process of articulating those three to five things. So here’s the action steps. And so they can consume that and be like, “Oh, okay. So in order to implement this concept, this is step one, step two, step three. Or here’s the exercise that we go through in order to think about what does this mean for us?”

Bryan Kelly:

And then the final piece is that we do like a facilitated workshop or discussion once a month to create space or allow time, margin. Everybody kind of describes it a little bit differently, but it’s just like a block of time, 90 minutes once a month to come together, either it’s an individual, or if a leader is bringing their team to say, “Okay, so here’s the action items, but let’s use this time to walk through these exercises and figure out, is this applicable to us? No, this one’s not applicable to us.” But the next action item or action step that we pulled out from that particular book, “Now this is something that’s relevant to us. How do we go from not doing it now to implementing it is something that within the next 30 days, we can actually get something out of it?”

Bryan Kelly:

So there’s a good example. There’s a book. I don’t know if you both are familiar with it, it’s called Who: The A Method for Hiring.

Amy Appleton:

No.

Bryan Kelly:

It’s by a gentleman named Geoffrey Smart. It is incredible, and I know you guys have really great hiring processes I’m sure.

Lisa Zeeveld:

We like to think we do, yes.

Bryan Kelly:

For sure. But for the entrepreneur or executive that’s like, “Man, we need to hire better. We’re doing a poor job at finding candidates, filtering candidates.” They have a very actionable step-by-step process that they’ve put together that a lot of fortune 500 companies use. And so we would take that and say, “Look, here’s the different pieces of the different action items. And then if you do these things and you work through these exercises to answer the questions for yourself, now guess what? You got a really great hiring plan and process.” Your standard operating procedure to focus on hiring the best people for the role or the right people for the right role is really what it comes down to. That’s huge. If you could have something like that, that goes from soup to nuts, here’s what the concept is. Here’s the things you need to know. Here’s how to implement it. That’s of tremendous value. So that’s kind of how we tackle things through the Stroke of Genius program.

Bryan Kelly:

I touched upon it a little bit, but the key is once you’ve gone through the WIT framework of writing, using imagery and talking about that content, that will cue you up to be in a position to really start to tackle those questions of like, why, what, how, when. Those basic questions that we learned in elementary school that most journalists kind of write their stories around when at least the good ones answer those questions. Those are the things that if you can answer those questions, that will set you up to be able to take action in a way that’s most relevant to the situation that you’re in or the end goal that you’re seeking to pursue.

Bryan Kelly:

So in the example of the Who book that I mentioned about hiring. The end goal would be, “We need to improve our hiring process.” And so you can then be in a great place to be thinking about that when you are fully aware of the concepts and begin to work through what does this mean for us?

Amy Appleton:

Excellent.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Awesome. Well, this conversation has been so, so good. And I feel like there’s so much more left to talk about don’t you Amy?

Amy Appleton:

I do.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I feel like we’ve got a lot to talk about. So Bryan, would you mind hanging around just a little bit longer and maybe that will become a bonus-od, a bonus episode, right?

Bryan Kelly:

All right.

Lisa Zeeveld:

All right, great.

Bryan Kelly:

Sounds good.

Lisa Zeeveld:

To hear a clip, subscribe to our email list and we will send you a link to our bonus content or visit onenextsteppodcast.com where you can find our link in our show notes.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well, there are very few people who I can say had this much goodness to share. I really do feel like even after this episode in our future bonus-od, that we could have kept talking to Bryan for another three episodes. Do you agree, Amy?

Amy Appleton:

I completely agree. The science behind what he was talking about was fascinating. And what I am really excited is to see the note-taking that’s imagery. For someone who does stick figures, I thought that was the piece that for me was like, “Oh, because he’s right.” Because if you can picture an image of something, it really does help it stick in your mind. I think that was kind of a key takeaway for me. In having the opportunity to actually draw out some things, and what would that look like? So it was fascinating.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. The whole framework to me seems so simple, right? But at the same time, it’s sort of mind blowing. It’s all the things like when I say myself that I feel like I’m more of a visual learner. That’s why it’s hard for me to listen to audio books because I really need to feel like I need to see the words on the page. And like you said, with his science, he kind of validated what I really feel.

Amy Appleton:

He really did. He absolutely did 100% and you’re an avid reader.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. Sometimes what I’ll do is I’ll start a book in the physical copy, and then I’ll go listen to it. Like if I’m in the car, but here’s the funny thing. Okay. Listeners, I’m going to tell you something really silly about me and please no judgment. I will go back to the parts of the book I listened to and highlight because again, I know that I won’t retain it if I don’t go back and listen to the words and kind of capture those key moments that stuck out. It saves me time listening to the audio portion, but I find I don’t retain it unless I go back and look at those words. Oh, my gosh. I just admitted that.

Amy Appleton:

I know. I don’t think it’s bad. I go back and listen to it. I try to hunt in my audio books for the chapter that I should remember the main point from and have to listen to it again.

Lisa Zeeveld:

I know. So, so good. Well guys as always, and we have talked about it a lot in this episode, we have a fantastic download for you so that you can take your one next step. This week’s download is from Bryan and his team at Stroke of Genius to help you get the most out of the content you read. And it recaps the entire WIT framework he shared with us during this episode.

Amy Appleton:

Yes. And if you want to text the phrase One Next Step to 31996, or visit onenextsteppodcast.com and you will get access to today’s resource and it will help you get moving forward.

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s right. So thank you guys so much for joining us until next time, lead wisely and lead well. Start by making today count.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Tune in next week for our conversation with Sheri Riley, a life strategist and empowerment speaker who is committed to helping high performers stop spending 100% of their time on 10% of who they are. You heard me, right. If you’ve reached a certain level of success, but still feel like something’s not right, then this episode is for you. Take a listen to our talk with Sheri.

Sheri Riley :

This narrow definition of success. How many zeros do I have in my bank account? And how many commas do I have between those zeros? What are the letters before my name and what are the letters behind my name? That narrow definition of success is robbing us of our peace, of our joy, of our happiness, of our marriages, of our relationships with our children. When our children are 16 and won’t talk to us, when we get to those critical moments and we go, “Oh, my God. Is this really happiness?”

Speaker 2:

Thanks for listening to One Next Step. Be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or follow us on Spotify, then join us next time for more practical business tips and tools to help you get more done, grow your business and lead your team with confidence. For more episodes, show notes and helpful resources visit onenextsteppodcast.com.

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