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About This Episode

Organizations often focus their marketing on a few channels that have worked for them in the past without understanding other opportunities to promote their business and make an impact. Unfortunately, this leaves their organization vulnerable if even one of their previous tactics or channels doesn’t produce at previous levels.

 

How can leaders at these organizations better use all marketing channels – both online and offline – to help them achieve the best possible results? 

 

In today’s episode, Tricia will be joined by our friend, Michael Taggart, the COO of Envoy Media Group, an award-winning direct-response marketing company. He’ll talk with us about how he uses online and offline marketing channels for his clients so they can better market their organizations.

1. Find your one thing.

When it comes to marketing, find one differentiator and use it over and over again. Try not to say all the things that make you awesome because that just gets overwhelming and confusing for customers. With marketing, less is always more. Focus on your one thing and hit it again and again.

2. Get all your data and insights in one place. 

Though you might be using different marketing channels, do your best to funnel it all into one place to see the end result. Envoy built their own tool for this, but many companies offer this as a service as well. This will make it much easier to interpret data and build strategy when you have everything in the same place.

3. Use a sticky marketing strategy.

When you use that one sticky point over and over again, people will remember you – even if they don’t click on the ad. They are more likely to search for you after the fact. This type of strategy speaks directly to a problem, a need someone has, and shows how your solution fixes it. With that, your product/service is “living rent-free” in someone’s mind.

 

What do you believe is the differentiator you can use to market your business?
What is your approach to offline and online marketing?
What are some of the best/worst online and offline experiences you’ve had with marketing?
What’s your view on outsourcing certain aspects of your marketing, like social media?

Our ultimate job is to put the right message in front of the right person at the right time.

Michael Taggart

Marketing is a game of quality, not quantity.

Michael Taggart

Sticky marketing is like living rent-free in someone’s mind.

Michael Taggart

Obsess about figuring out your one big idea.

Michael Taggart

Michael Taggart on LinkedIn and at Envoy Media Group.

Tricia Sciortino on Instagram and LinkedIn.

Lisa Zeeveld on Instagram and LinkedIn.

BELAY Solutions

Rolls Royce

(01:40) Michael talks about being a licensed pilot and how he got into flying. 

(04:12) Michael discusses his journey in marketing and how he got to where he is today at Envoy Media. 

(08:17) What are the misconceptions and differences between online and offline marketing?

(10:56) How do you prevent spreading yourself too thin across channels and making sure you find the right balance? 

(15:00) Find the one thing to focus your marketing on and use it everywhere. Don’t try and cover all the things at once because that confuses people. Focus on one thing. Less is more. 

(16:40) Michael talks about using technology in marketing and how to not get overwhelmed by all the options. 

(20:06) What is a “sticky marketing strategy?”

(24:03) Michael talks about his thoughts on leveraging contractors and outsourcing within marketing teams. 

(28:47) What’s one practical tip someone can take to move toward an integrated marketing approach?

Michael Taggart:

I think about sticky marketing strategy. The thought that comes up for me is like you’re living rent-free in someone’s mind. You’ve planted a seed. So to do that, you’ve got to speak directly to a problem that a person is having and how your solution is there for it.

Speaker 2:

Welcome to One Next Step, the most practical business podcast in the world, helping you get more done, grow your business, and lead your team with confidence, with tips and tools you didn’t get in business school. Here are your hosts, Tricia Sciortino and Lisa Zeeveld.

Tricia Sciortino:

Welcome to One Next Step, the practical business podcast that helps you run your business so it stops running you. I’m Tricia. LZ is out today, so I’m going to be going solo on today’s episode, featuring our friend Michael Taggart, who’s here to chat about all things integrated marketing. Michael is the COO of Envoy Media Group, an award-winning direct response marketing company. He believes strongly in the value of integrated marketing, how both offline and online channels work together to help promote businesses and make an impact. Today, he’ll talk with us about how he uses online and offline marketing channels for his clients so they better market their organizations. Take a listen.

Tricia Sciortino:

Hey Michael, thank you so much for joining us on the One Next Step Podcast today. It is an honor to have you with us.

Michael Taggart:

Thank you. It’s an honor to be here.

Tricia Sciortino:

And a BELAY client, nevertheless.

Michael Taggart:

I am, for a long time, and our company is continuing to add more BELAY assistance as we go. It’s been a real help to our growth.

Tricia Sciortino:

I love that. That is great news. That is great news. I’m glad it’s working out well. You’re also an expert marketer, and I am excited to talk all things marketing today. But before we get there, I heard you fly. Are you a pilot?

Michael Taggart:

I’m a private pilot, yeah. I haven’t flown in a while, though, and so all it does is plague every life insurance application I do from here on out. Yeah, when my first daughter was born, that was kind of like, I don’t have the time, and at the time, or the money, to keep doing it. And so I kind of put it on pause, but yeah, flew for several years. And I didn’t think it was that long since I’ve flown, but my last flight was 2007. So yeah, it’s been a while.

Tricia Sciortino:

Oh, that is a long time. So how did you even get into flying in the first place? I’m asking because actually my husband is retired from the airlines, so he’s kind of an airplane guy also.

Michael Taggart:

I had, with the first company that I founded, you know, you go through all the entrepreneur stuff of getting a company set up, get it scaling and all that, profitable. And I got to a point where I don’t know, I just got this idea in my head. When I was a kid, I really always wanted to be a doctor, but for a brief stint, I wanted to be a pilot, and I always wanted to fly. And I’m one of these people that I’m always really, really curious about learning new things. I might not necessarily make it my entire life’s passion, but I really want to learn it.

Michael Taggart:

So I said, you know what, I’m going to get my private pilot’s license, and kind of did it on a lark. And a buddy of mine said, “I’ll do it, too.” And so I just signed myself up at the local airport. I did an intro flight, said this will be really fun, and I wanted to experience it. And so I did that. During the course of that training, I got engaged and married, so that lengthened out my time and I ended up spending more money because of it. But yeah, it was just something I always wanted to do.

Tricia Sciortino:

I love that.

Michael Taggart:

And so I just kind of just went out and did it and experienced it. It’s something I know I’ll pick up later in life. I’ve got three girls and three young kids keeping me on my toes. So taking the time to go to the airport pre-flight, check it out, go fly somewhere, come back, it’s not in the cards right now for me.

Tricia Sciortino:

Oh, sure.

Michael Taggart:

And if you’re not flying often, then you’re not really safe. It’s one of those things that rusts. You don’t want to sit a lot. So I’m hoping to get back into it, but yeah, just wanted to do it.

Tricia Sciortino:

I love it. Yeah, three young girls will put a hinder on anything.

Michael Taggart:

Yeah, it’s great, don’t get me wrong. I wouldn’t trade it for the world, but certain things and certain time commitments are a little bit trickier.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, I totally get it. I have two daughters. They’re now teenagers, but the years of freedom, the giggles are well worth it, with little girls, but yeah.

Michael Taggart:

It’s awesome.

Tricia Sciortino:

Raising youngins certainly does take time. Well, I love that. That’s a great story. I’d love to hear, you know, to continue on your journey, how it is you transitioned and what your journey has been like into marketing, and especially where you are today in your organization now, with Envoy Media.

Michael Taggart:

Sure. It’s quite a long story. I first started in ’99, developing and doing stuff online and some marketing. And in 2000, 2001, I founded my first company, and we specialized in organic search, figuring out the Google algorithm and getting traffic. And that company grew to like 400,000 visitors a day, 200 national clients. It was great. But we shifted in 2005, 2006, to Envoy Media Group, because the cat and mouse game of algorithms changing in search, it just, it was too volatile as a thing, even though we had some success up to that point.

Michael Taggart:

And so we decided that what we’re going to do is we’re going to buy every click and we’re going to do a performance-based approach, where we can control who our clients are and who we decide to work with because we’re going to build our own websites, pay for our own media, and then just deliver leads or sales or what have you on the other end. And so in 2005, we founded Envoy Media Group and started doing that and built, I’m kind of the technical part of the co-founding team, there’s four of us. My degree is in marketing. I love it. But on the tech side, we built our own platform from the ground up to profitably buy the traffic and figure out in a lead generation thing, artificial intelligence, to figure out which client to match a lead up to, and all sorts of fun stuff.

Tricia Sciortino:

Fascinating.

Michael Taggart:

And so starting with four of us, and now I believe we’re pushing over 20 people at the company now, not counting BELAY people, assistants. And some I am, because some BELAY assistants we’ve actually hired on full-time, because BELAY has a certain caliber of people that’s pretty hard to find.

Tricia Sciortino:

Thank you. Thank you. That’s what we’re trying to do. We’re trying to provide quality support to businesses like you. See, and we didn’t even ask you to say that today.

Michael Taggart:

Yeah, no.

Tricia Sciortino:

I appreciate the unsolicited.

Michael Taggart:

I am kind of an evangelist in a lot of ways, because it solves a real tough point when you’re bootstrapped. If you’re getting venture capital, that’s one thing. But if you’re bootstrapping and doing old school build a business, you don’t really have the luxury of having a bad hire. And the truth is, there’s a lot of work that doesn’t necessarily need a full-time person hired, but it’s such a huge win to be able to bring on someone on a contract basis, and if it doesn’t work out with them or the hours shift or whatever, you’re agile that way, and you’re not committed, especially because we’re a California corporation. And the list is a mile long of all of the regulations around a W2 hire. So you have to be very, very careful.

Michael Taggart:

So BELAY solves that really important bit, where you’re ready to scale, you’re starting to, but you can’t commit to full-time bringing on a ton of people and you just need to get some more hands helping. And I say it’s not just hands, like many of the BELAY assistants we’ve hired are MBAs. I know my personal assistant Jackie was. And they’re phenomenal at helping out in different stages of growth at the company.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, gosh, I love that. We still, you know, our team is over a hundred employees strong and we still outsource in contract work too, because the concept, and especially in our marketing department and kind of aligns with you and your organization, is what a great area of your business to contract new positions out, bring on expertise, and then expand and grow those relationships in those roles specifically. We’ve done it time and time again. We still do it now because we find it to be such a great way to find and leverage talent, even if you need it fractionally. I mean, sometimes you don’t need a full-time person to run Google ads. You need somebody fractionally who’s doing that for you. So it’s been great for us.

Tricia Sciortino:

And to your point, I mean Google and the analytics and the changes. So that’s a great tee in to my first question. When we’re talking about the misconceptions or the differences between online marketing and offline marketing, I’d love for you to talk a little bit about those misconceptions.

Michael Taggart:

So really, I think the biggest misconception I’ll hear, when you talk about the different channels of online and offline, is that they’re siloed from each other, that they operate in a vacuum, is kind of the way most marketers approach that, or business owners, as you’re looking at it, like, what’s going to be my TV spend, my radio spend, my Google ads spend, or online or Facebook. There’s somany different channels. And so the biggest misconception is that you treat the channels like people, but they’re not. The channels reach people. Our ultimate job is to put the right message in front of the right person at the right time.

Michael Taggart:

So if you think about it in your daily life, people, we all know we interact with multiple channels in any given day, week, month. I mean, I’ve seen studies, like hundreds of ad exposures a day. So when you’re doing online and offline, we’ll talk about those two big things, the real kicker is you need to combine them strategically because they have a compounding effect. I’ve got a friend who runs a different agency, and they do tons of media for a lot of places. And he said something once to me that always stuck. He goes, Mike, I have this solar panel client doing a ton of stuff. And they said, you know what, the radio spend is just not quite working for us, the way that they were measuring and stuff. Let’s cut the radio spend and see what happens.

Michael Taggart:

Now at the time, the radio spend was about 10% of their budget. The next month, sales dropped 50%. And so when you have this compounding effect, one plus one plus one is five, and you don’t exactly know how or why. It just does, if you align things correctly. So I’d say that’s the biggest misconception, is that they don’t help.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. We always kind of felt that way, that there are just some parts of marketing that it’s really hard to tie a direct ROI to or a direct customer to, that maybe a lead came in and the source may say Google, but really what happened is they first saw an ad somewhere else. So they heard something on a podcast, then they went to Google. Or, they heard a radio ad, and then they went to the website, or then they went on social media. And so it’s hard to track. And so we kind of live by that motto, that we want to be in multiple places. And we never really truly know what the first time is somebody heard our brand.

Tricia Sciortino:

But I think you also can run into, especially if you’re truly a creative team, how do you prevent going off the rails, really? I mean, you could really spread yourself, is there such a thing as spreading yourself too thin across channels? How narrow do you remain? What is some good coaching you would give to somebody around the channel management and what’s too much and what’s right on?

Michael Taggart:

Yeah, I think it’s a really good point, because if you start thinking about the myriad of ways that you can run ads, it’s just almost infinite. There’s so many places. And the truth is, I guess my advice, it’s a little bit different as you’re scaling up spend to millions of dollars a month and that kind of thing, but the same concepts apply of how you keep everything aligned, whether or not you’re just running with one person, all the channels, or you have individual people running.

Michael Taggart:

So I think about it like this, in kind of four stages, like top down. There’s vision, then there’s brand, then strategy, and then tactics. So vision, we know what vision is, what we’re going to do. Brand is like, it really centers with who your target customer is and everything about them. And what is the brand voice? Is it witty, funny, professional? What are the rules about the way you present yourself in any given channel, agnostic of channel? And then we kick into strategy, and this is, David Ogilvy, who was a legendary marketer, coined the term, a big idea. And this is what I think about in terms of strategy. A big idea, it’s one single thing, one single kind of benefit, if you will, and I’ll unpack it a little bit, of your advertising that stays the same across all the channels.

Michael Taggart:

When you get to tactics, that’s all right, what’s our Facebook campaign structure? What’s our Google structure? How are we doing the buys by zip code and radio, whatever. You put that on the shelf and you say, what’s our one big idea that we’re going to go to market with, because what you don’t want is your online ad saying one thing, your radio ad saying another, your TV ads saying another. Forget if they all look the same. If they’re not cohesive, you lose an unbelievable amount of the power of having all those things there.

Michael Taggart:

So big ideas, some famous ones are Claude Hopkins in the early 1900s did one for Schlitz Beer and his whole big idea of all their marketing, and they became I believe the largest brewery in the country after this, was that their beer was pure. Brewing rooms had filtered in air, prevented contaminants, filtering pumps were cleaned out twice a day, beer bottles sterilized four times a day. Just hit the fact that they were pure. Now, the funny thing about it, all beer is made that way, but the consumer doesn’t know that. And so Schlitz went and got so huge in the market because every channel all talked about how pure their beer was. So you think about, that’s a big idea.

Michael Taggart:

David Ogilvy himself had one that I think is wonderful. Rolls-Royce tapped him to say, all right, we’re going to do cross channel radio, print, TV. This is in the sixties, I believe. And he went to the Rolls-Royce factory. He went through testimonials, and he was trying to come up with a big idea, and he left the factory pretty depressed. So he’s driving back home to the airline, and all he hears is the clock ticking in this Rolls-Royce that they drove him back to the airport in. And then he realized, he has it. And his big idea was at 60 miles an hour, the loudest noise you’re going to hear in the new Rolls-Royce comes from the electric clock.

Michael Taggart:

And so then all their print, radio, and TV talked about how peaceful and quiet. You can talk about luxury lots of different ways. But if you hone in on the one thing and then go to market all of those things, that’s where you get the biggest power.

Tricia Sciortino:

I love that. That’s powerful. That story actually gave me goosebumps on my arm, actually, truly, just how profound finding that one simple thing can be, and what it is for you, and putting it everywhere. I love that.

Michael Taggart:

And marketers have a temptation to do this, but business owners, too, particularly if you’re a small business owner, a florist in a local area, a window repair place. It’s your baby. So you want to say everything. You want to say, like, I do this, this, this, this, this. But all you’re doing is you’re confusing people. You’re giving them bowling balls to hold. You only want to give them one, just one thing. Less is more. And if you’re going to commit money across these channels, you have to focus in one single place.

Michael Taggart:

And it’s hard to just magically come up with what that big idea is. You talked about Google ads and paid search. I always recommend, if you’re going to go into a market selling something and you’re not quite sure exactly what’s going to resonate, go with paid search, Google being, and those searchers, it’s almost cheating in marketing, certain keywords, they’re what we call bottom of funnel or solution aware. They’re like, I want Nike red Air Jordans, and I have credit card in hand. Buy that keyword, and you can’t convert that person, you have no business going to other places to convert a person, right?

Tricia Sciortino:

Oh, that’s a wise little tidbit right there. That’s a wise little tidbit.

Michael Taggart:

With business these days, I always like to start marketing in paid search, and hone your stuff there and then you can go up to the Facebooks and the YouTube.

Tricia Sciortino:

What is resonating? What is hitting? What are people aligning themselves to? I love that. Yeah. I also love that what’s very unique and different about what you do is how you integrate technology, how you have made technology such a huge leverage point for how you deliver and experience marketing. I would love if you would talk a little bit about technology as part of marketing, and best tips on leveraging without maybe hitting up against overwhelm or being intimidated by, God, there’s so many platforms and so many things out there these days.

Michael Taggart:

Yep. Yep. There’s a lot. And it’s only going to grow. It’s only growing. I have the interesting perspective of, we don’t use many off the shelf technology things out there. We built our own from the ground up, to kind of do all this marketing, show us what we want. I don’t recommend people doing that, though, unless you have a savant team of programmers or are one yourself.

Tricia Sciortino:

Right, right, right. Or they can work with you, or they can come to you.

Michael Taggart:

Yeah. But the thought really is, no matter what you’re using in your tech stack, the whole point of technology in marketing, the biggest, biggest value, is insight, connecting the dots across channels, across sites, across folders, whatever you’re looking at, across SMS campaigns or whatever. Because many of the tools you’ll use, you’ll use MailChimp for email and you’ll use Twilio for SMS and you’ll use this and that whatever, and Google analytics for your WordPress site, and none of those things talk to each other. They all exist in their own place. So your focus should be to find a piece of technology that goes out and pulls from all those places and brings all of that data into one place as much as you can.

Tricia Sciortino:

Integrate.

Michael Taggart:

Yes.

Tricia Sciortino:

Integrate it all.

Michael Taggart:

Always connecting the dots and integrating it. And the whole point, like, yes, you can have tech optimized automatically, but in reality, the data insights to humans, and algorithms, we will like wag the dog with Google by using our platform to look at lifetime value, not just how much that purchase was, and then tell Google it’s worth more than it really was, to get more of those, right? You can do that stuff, but you have to be able to look at the data in one place to get the insights.

Michael Taggart:

So there are several things out there that are trying to be that one size fits all. We built our own. So I’m unique in that thing. But companies, like Wicked Reports comes to mind, there’s plenty out there that you could take a look at, but really, as a marketer or a business owner, get all of your data in one place as much as you can. And it’s a constant battle, but get it in one place, so you can look at it in one shot.

Tricia Sciortino:

Awesome tip.

Tricia Sciortino:

You are working too many hours, and it’s bleeding over into your evenings and weekends. You are missing valuable family time, and honestly, life is zipping by you. Sound familiar? Let’s get uncomfortably honest here. How long has it been since you were fully present and felt peace? It’s probably too long. You know how I know? Because I’ve been there.

Tricia Sciortino:

But as with any struggle or obstacle in life, the first step is admitting you have a problem. You may not have everything under control. You know who can help you get everything under control? A BELAY virtual assistant. Stop spending countless hours every week on tasks that someone else could do for you. Contact us today to discover how you can reclaim your schedule, focus on what matters, and achieve the growth you and your business deserve. Get started by visiting belaysolutions.com/services/assistants today.

Tricia Sciortino:

Okay, so let’s talk about sticky marketing strategy. What is a sticky, this idea of having a sticky marketing strategy?

Michael Taggart:

I think about sticky marketing strategy, the thought that comes up for me is like you’re living rent-free in someone’s mind. You’ve planted a seed. Let’s go back to our big idea. You planted like your one thing you do. Oh, the Rolls-Royce is quieter than any other car out there. It’s just there. It’s planted. And as people go about their lives, it recalls it. And that can come down to the way you did your ad creative, your messaging, or just the words, like what your main point is.

Michael Taggart:

So you want your marketing to be sticky, such that when you run ads, even if they don’t click, they are more likely to search for you later or they’re able to remember or recall that ad. So to do that, you’ve got to speak directly to a problem that the person or the business, really the business is made of people, but speak to one problem that person is having and how your solution is there for it. So stick to a big idea, run there. And that’s your best bet across all the channels of kind of living rent-free in someone’s mind.

Michael Taggart:

The Coca-Colas of the world are the best at this. And I used to think of branding as like a dirty word. No, I want to run a click, pay for it, get a conversion, right? Like, simple. And branding is for people that don’t sell. But what they discount when you do that is you’re looking at everything in one isolated channel, and you’re not zooming back. Look at your entirety of your revenue brought in that month. Look at the entirety. It’s the only way you can really gauge it. And if you have sticky marketing, you’re getting more return visitors, more visitors through organic and type in traffic, that kind of thing. And if you turn off your marketing, you get less.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. I think it’s easy for the small business to say, well, I’m going to spend my effort where I can see the value immediately. I’m putting on a paid Google ad. I got the lead form, and I generated a sale. You could easily see, it’s like the quick win scenario, where maybe branding goes kind of to the, when we have time or if we have money at some point, maybe we’ll do some branding, because that’s fluffy. There’s not a direct ROI. But I think they’re missing the fact that there absolutely is ROI. You just might not be able to connect the dots so immediately. I know that’s where we’ve been over the years, is where we’ve gone back and forth on where branding is valuable and whatnot. And it’s easy to revert to lead generating activities versus branding activities.

Michael Taggart:

Yeah, and you want it to kind of infuse throughout everything you do. So like I was telling you before, a paid search with Google ads is where you should start. And guess what? It’s on easy mode. You get the one click, one sale. You can track it’s fairly easy. But you’ll start noticing problems as you move up the stack of Google. You go from red Nike shoes with credit card in hand, to just red shoes, to just shoes. Even those keywords, you’re going to have to rely on kind of that big idea push more, because you don’t really know what they want. So starting with the paid search is there.

Michael Taggart:

But if all you do is that bottom of funnel paid search, you can do that, generate revenue and make money, but you’re very, very limited. It’s a tip of the iceberg where the bulk of it is underneath the water, right? Sure, get the tip, start there. Make sure you can do that. But the real value is if you can live rent-free in a market’s mind and they come back looking for you because of what you’ve exposed them to.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. I love that. I love that. So we talked a little bit at the top of this conversation about, you know, you talked a little bit about your team growing and how you’ve been leveraging BELAY virtual assistants and so on and so forth to help subsidize some great work. But generally speaking, outside of your work with BELAY, what are your thoughts on marketing leveraging, outsourcing to fill maybe fractional key roles, and the theories that go behind using that as a way to scale?

Michael Taggart:

Yeah. I’m a big fan of the contract first mindset, contract out and then you’ll kind of get your lay of the land better. And Envoy, operationally, we instituted an operating system at the company called holacracy. And whether you like it or not is beside the point. The one thing it does really, really well is you clarify the roles the company needs, not who has them. Put that to the side. What are the accountabilities that that role is, if you’re a Facebook marketer or Google ads marketer? What are those things? And we’ll deal with who fills it later.

Michael Taggart:

So it’s helped us notice spots where even, we’re a marketing agency and there’s times, hey, we don’t have anyone here with a depth in Instagram or with a depth in Snapchat, let’s say, or whatever. And we really want to push in it. Well, we’ll look to things like BELAY if possible, MarketerHire, Advisable, all of these places out there that actually help contract experts, people that have done that exact channel, that can be a guide for you.

Michael Taggart:

And then what we like to do is buddy up an internal person with that guide. So the internal person has the role, they’re accountable to it, but they’ve got a mentor and a guide that gives them strategy, that soundboards and kind of gets it going. And it’s a huge thing, especially if you’re not a marketing company or you’re too small to afford it, fractionally you could afford four hours of an expert’s time a week or a month, could make all the difference. Marketing is a game of quality, not quantity. One ad could change the trajectory of your entire company. And it’s just one ad. It’s not about the amount of hours it took. We’re not building assembly lines, widgets, you know?

Michael Taggart:

So it’s a big thing to find expertise, wherever you can find it. And a lot of really great people don’t want to work full-time with one company. They just love marketing so much, they just want to help so many people broaden their horizons. So I hope that answers your question.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. I think it’s good for people to know. You don’t have to be at the place where you have to bring on somebody full-time. There’s so many fractional opportunities out there and so many ways to get your hands onto talent on a very part-time basis. You don’t have to save up and wait until you can afford to hire somebody, that you can actually leverage talent, like you said, four hours a week, five hours a week, especially in the marketing areas of your business and social media and all that stuff. And they are well worth the dollar you spend getting that right, versus having somebody unexperienced try to get it right.

Michael Taggart:

And you can also push all this out to an agency, an agency that does it full service. The question you have to ask in your mind is, do I ever want to develop these skills in-house? Do I ever want to be able to do this in-house? Well, we’re a marketing agency, so the answer is yes, pretty obvious. But do you know what? If you’re like a florist or you’re a contractor in a particular area, you probably don’t want to develop all that in-house, nor should you. Just be good at the one thing you do, and hand it off to someone or an agency that has the team to be able to put this stuff out. So I always have to remember that, because I come at it from a mindset of we’re a marketing agency, everyone’s doing that. No. For a lot of people, it makes a ton of sense to farm it out to an agency.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. Because you don’t need to be, to your point, you don’t have to be an expert in marketing. You just have to be an expert in flowers and customer service and serving your community. And I think a lot of leaders and entrepreneurs maybe miss that fact, that they have to become experts in all areas of their business and they have to know how to do and be an expert in the sales and the marketing and the operations and the delivery and the service, when really, not at all. I mean, everything is a team approach. So find great talent, put great teams together, whether it’s outsourced, in-house, and you win.

Michael Taggart:

And Tricia, honestly, if you’re in the dentist chair, the last thing I want to hear from my dentist is him talking about what conversion action on Google he should be using. I just want him to do teeth well. He should not spend any amount of time doing any of that.

Tricia Sciortino:

Absolutely.

Michael Taggart:

You’ve got to know your business and who you are, and the truth is, the entrepreneur thing is being chief bottle washer. You have to do everything, so you think you’re good at everything. In reality, you’re not.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. The quicker you can come to that conclusion, the better.

Michael Taggart:

The faster your company will grow.

Tricia Sciortino:

Absolutely. I love that. So if you could give one last practical tip for anybody listening right now, a step they could take to move more towards an integrated marketing approach, what would you tell them?

Michael Taggart:

In terms of kind of that framework I gave, vision, brand, strategy, and tactics, vision and brand I’ll just assume are there. The place where I see people make the biggest mistake, and we make it too, sometimes, is we jump straight to tactics. So hit that strategy level hard, obsess about figuring out your one big idea, and all of your, from print, radio, TV, online, everything is going to drive home that one point.

Michael Taggart:

And that one point is different for each company, so you really have to obsess over existing customer data, reviews, testimonials. I recommend, become a customer service rep. Get trained, man the phones, whatever you have to do. Talk to real people, listen to real people. Out of that data is what your big idea should be. People will talk if you talk to them about what’s their actual solution. And like so many times, we’re inside the bottle, it’s hard to read the label. So you have to obsess about the customer and come up with one big idea you’re going to run across all of your channels, and go there.

Tricia Sciortino:

I love it. That is a perfect practical tip for all of us. Go find your one big idea, leverage your data and your customer base to get it. Thank you so much for joining us. This has been a great conversation, Michael. I really do appreciate you spending time with me today.

Michael Taggart:

Thank you, Tricia. It’s been a pleasure to be here.

Tricia Sciortino:

Hey guys, was that not an awesome interview with Michael? What an honor to have, first of all, a BELAY client with us, but someone who really has leveraged a BELAY client to outsource and then had some really great tips on all things marketing, fractional marketing. And I love what he had to say about branding and the cohesion across your channels. I mean, if that isn’t a good nugget to take away, I don’t know what is. So hope you enjoyed the episode, guys.

Tricia Sciortino:

To get today’s show notes with links to resources, text the phrase “one next step” to 31996, or visit onenextsteppodcast.com to keep moving forward. Thank you for joining us today. We will see you next week for another great episode of The One Next Step. Start by making today count.

Tricia Sciortino:

Check out next week’s episode, where we’ll have Jeff Shinabarger, the CEO of Pilot People. He will share practical ways leaders can learn how to make the best decisions, even when it’s difficult to decide. Here’s a sneak peek into our conversation with Jeff.

Jeff Shinabarger:

Ultimately, if you look back in your year, there’s probably somewhere between eight to 12 decisions you made in that year that determine the success of your business in that year. That happens every time. And I started thinking about that. I was like, wow, when you start looking backwards, you’re like these few decisions I made determined whether we hit our budget, whether we exceeded our budget, whether we won, or we thought it was a rough year.

Speaker 2:

Thanks for listening to One Next Step. Be sure to subscribe on Apple podcasts or follow us on Spotify. Then join us next time for more practical business tips and tools to help you get more done, grow your business, and lead your team with confidence. For more episodes, show notes, and helpful resources, visit onenextsteppodcast.com.

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