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About This Episode

In this special edition of One Next Step, we’re celebrating the 50th episode of the podcast by sharing a few highlights from some of our most popular episodes. We have had so many great episodes, so it was hard to narrow it down but we picked a few favorites. 

 

You’ll hear from Daymond John from Shark Tank, Michael Hyatt, Megan Hyatt Miller, Colleen Stanley, and the founders of BELAY, Bryan and Shannon Miles, as they talk about topics like the biggest barrier to work-life balance, the most important part of your strategic plan, why salespeople underperform, and how delegation empowers team members and drives performance. So settle in and enjoy this special episode. 

1. Life is a series of mentors.

No matter where you are in your career, whether you’re just getting started or have been at it for years, you always need a mentor. And, eventually, you always should be looking to mentor others. Look for people who have been there before you, and be willing to share with those who haven’t gotten to where you are yet. And that doesn’t always relate to age – think of what an 18-year-old could share with you about certain technologies or social media you might not be familiar with as a 50 year old.

2. Vision is where you’re going, and strategy is how you get there.

Michael Hyatt suggests going beyond making just a simple vision statement. Make a vision script. This is a short 3-5 page document, written in the present tense, that talks about where you want to be in the future, as if you are already there. Real vision is about thinking of the future of your team, your product development, your marketing, and your eventual impact.

 

3. Every business leader should always be prepared for sudden change.

 That should be a huge takeaway from the 2020 global pandemic. David Farmer talks about how Chick-fil-A had to suddenly adapt its business model from dining room and drive throughs to exclusively making to-go orders with dining rooms closed. If you aren’t prepared for changes, you’ll never be able to quickly adapt to keep your business running smoothly, even through a national crisis.

 

What is one thing that changed about your business because of the global pandemic? Were you ready for that change, and how did you adapt?
Who are some of the most important mentors you’ve had in your life? 
Have you had the opportunity to mentor others? What effect has that had on both of you?
How would you quickly summarize the vision you have for your company 5 years from now?

Life is a series of mentors, and I am a product of a lifelong list of mentors.

Daymond John

Your organization is always going to move at the speed of trust.

Daniel Tardy

Any business leader needs a portfolio full of new ideas.

David Farmer

If you aren’t focused on soft skills you are missing 50% of what it takes for your team to be successful.

Colleen Stanley

Always be looking ahead of the curve.

Brian Miles

(01:36) Daymond John shares the best investment you can make in business. 

(06:47) Shannon Miles talks about how it can be difficult to delegate and spend money on new hires at first. 

(09:44) Michael Hyatt talks about how to create vision and strategic planning as leaders and entrepreneurs. 

(14:29) Why communication and trust matter to an organization’s leadership.

(16:29) Colleen Stanley shares details on what she calls the “sales leadership insanity loop.”

(19:16) David Farmer from Chick-fil-A shares how every business leader always needs to have a portfolio of new ideas and be ready for change. 

(21:54) What prevents leaders from winning at both work and life? Megan Hyatt Miller shares her thoughts.

Speaker:

Welcome to One Next Step, the most practical business podcast in the world. Helping you get more done, grow your business, and lead your team with confidence, with tips and tools you didn’t get in business school. Here are your hosts, Tricia Sciortino and Lisa Zeeveld.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Welcome to One Next Step — the practical business podcast that helps you run your business so it stops running you. I’m Lisa Zeeveld.

Tricia Sciortino :

And, I’m Tricia. Today, we’re celebrating the 50th episode of One Next Step by sharing a few highlights from some of our most popular episodes. We have had so many great episodes, so it was hard to narrow it down. But here are some of our favorites.

Lisa Zeeveld:

In today’s episode, you’ll hear from leaders like: Daymond John from Shark Tank, Bestselling author, business coach, and leadership expert, Michael Hyatt, the CEO of Michael Hyatt & Company organization, Megan Hyatt Miller, Sales expert Colleen Stanley, and the founders of BELAY — Bryan and Shannon Miles.

Tricia Sciortino :

And in these short clips, they’ll share things like: The biggest barrier to work-life balance, The most important part of your strategic plan, Why salespeople underperform, How delegation empowers team members and drives performance, The connection between communication & your organization’s culture, and Now, we’ll start with Daymond John of Shark Tank sharing the best investment you can make in business.

Daymond John:

I heard Warren Buffet say this is, “To constantly educate themselves on what their competition is doing and where the market is going, what they haven’t done already, and where they need to be stronger. Warren Buffet said it best, he said, “You’re not going to be able to change what happens in the world, but the only thing that is going to be stuck with you for the rest of your life is you, yourself, and your education.” Alright? And no matter where you go, you’re there and your education, your skillset, and your ability, and your knowledge is going to be the thing that either is going to help you avoid landmines or look for goldmines.

Daymond John:

So it purely is education. I mean right now, if you’re that person who is home and your retail operation is shut down. Are you understanding how to convert on online and build a social media presence? If you have to shut down your business, so are you going to start over more wisely because you really didn’t know how you were looking at your finance and you didn’t have whether enough cash on hand or you didn’t have enough profit margin or you were paying too much because you just weren’t financially intelligent. How are you going to educate yourself in those areas? I mean it’s always going to be only education.

Tricia Sciortino :

Yeah. I think as leaders, right? Your business will only grow as far as you grow as the owner or the CEO. If you limit your growth and education, you’re going to limit the organization’s ability to grow. So we can become the cap or the lid on growth if we don’t continue to insist in our own professional development. So I know we believe that at Belay, sounds like you do too, Daymond, that investing in ourselves is the best gift we can give our companies to make sure that we are wiser and smarter and better and more educated tomorrow than we are today.

Daymond John:

And listen, running a business is hard, right? There’s so many different categories. There is manufacturing, distribution, advertising, marketing, finance, all kind of taxes, all kinds of things. You can educate yourself in everything. So if you are somebody running a business, one of the things you may need to educate yourself in is, “Who can help me in this area? How can I get somebody virtually to help me in this area or whatever the case is? Because I don’t know and I’m going to put out this fire right here and I’m going to then educate myself on who else I need because I need to educate myself on my weaknesses. So I can focus on my strengths to bring somebody else in.” So, I don’t want people thinking they’ve got to read a hundred books and be the most brilliant person tomorrow. It’s just educate yourself on what you need. If you’re working out, don’t you need to educate yourself on your nutrition and different ways to work out and your body mass index and things of that nature? You’ve got to educate yourself, no matter what.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And have a mentor too. Obviously, that you spend a lot of time, I know, mentoring business leaders. That’s pretty incredible to have somebody in your corner, so you don’t have to read that big stack of books. They already read it. They’re going to give you the quick version of it.

Daymond John:

I think you said something that I totally forgot and that is true. Life is a series of mentors, period. I am a product of a lifelong list of mentors. I still seek mentors. And sometimes, in my company, there’s reverse mentorship. I’m Batman and everybody else is Robin. But most of the time, I’m Robin and they’re Batman, because I shouldn’t have hired them if they weren’t smarter than me and sometimes the mentors are the 18-year-old digital natives that are communicating on the Tiktoks of the world and the Twitches of the world. And I remember somebody said to me, probably about six months ago they go, “Daymond, why are you studying TikTok?” Now I haven’t found my DNA on TikTok. And with this craziness, I’ve been a little busy.

Tricia Sciortino :

I’m going to be looking. Yeah.

Daymond John:

Yeah. Well, you know what I said to them? I said, “Why? Because the 15-year-old kid on TikTok, who’s on there today, is going to be your consumer in 10 years. And you need to think about that. We’re in this thing for the long haul and you need to basically go back to mentorship and who’s going to mentor you the best on TikTok? Probably your daughter.”

Tricia Sciortino :

My 16-year-old daughter is taking me to TikTok school every day.

Daymond John:

Exactly. Exactly. And then still, let’s not forget that people who’ve been around for many years and they are seniors, they are very, very smart. They’ve forgotten more than you’ve learned or the veterans who have completed tasks in the most craziest circumstances and did it within a system and there was no “no.” So there’s so many ways that you can be mentored. And if you don’t have those people around you, then get a digital curriculum, pick up a book. Find that way to get that in. We’re going back to education with mentors. They’re really, really important. They’re the number one reason for success.

Tricia Sciortino :

Yeah. Well, you got Daymond on demand. So, we can have you all the time as our mentor.

Daymond John:

Absolutely, I have Daymond on demand. But again, listen, what I find is, why do I listen to a lot of audio books? It’s because all of these books were written and, or by different people that may not know each other. Everybody from Gary V. to Napoleon Hill, to Tony Robbins, but if I see the same things throughout all these books, what is it, a big conspiracy? No, they are all telling you these ways.

Tricia Sciortino :

They’re on to something.

Daymond John:

Yeah. They’re on to something, so why don’t you listen?

Shannon Miles:

I think for a leader that’s reluctant to turn over leadership. Like I was in the beginning, it felt you’re responsible to, right out the gate, start delegating things to people. It just did. I’ll just be totally honest. It became easier to do over the years as those points of delegation were proven to be successful. But in the beginning, I’m thinking about 2010 going into 2011, it felt frivolous to delegate. To spend the money on a hire? To spend the money on a hire. Yeah. I remember I was doing the bookkeeping back in the day, which was very much not a good use of my time.

Tricia Sciortino :

I can remember not getting a few paychecks.

Bryan Miles:

Bad idea.

Tricia Sciortino :

[crosstalk 00:05:56] Keep it in the family.

Shannon Miles:

Bryan was always looking ahead of the curve. So I think you’ve got two different types of leaders and he and I were, like you said, he was always looking out in the distance and anticipating what the needs were going to be at hiring ahead of that. And I was more like, no, let’s save money. Let’s not bring on an additional team member at this time. There’s something we can do this, we can do this. And that was such a short sided view that ultimately would have hampered our growth as a company. If that mindset had been the prevailing one in that Bryan’s.

Bryan Miles:

And I felt like collectively, we had a gun to our head. Like it was time to go and I never wanted to create something small, and I wanted people to kind of gain in our vision and join in what we were trying to do and accomplish.

Bryan Miles:

So I never envisioned that Belay would be a tiny thing. I wanted great committed people to come along for the ride that I care for. And that’s certainly been the case, but I felt a sense of pressure. So for me, it was like if Tricia could do these early on things and Shannon could do these things early on and L.C., Then that would allow me to focus on what I need to do is just get on an airplane and go meet people and network and grow our company in a different way that only I could do.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well, I think it’s really interesting because working with both you and Shannon, you just mentioned it Shannon. I mean you guys kind of were coming from this from two different points of view. You didn’t quite want to spend the money and, and Bryan had this big vision. And so I think that really might resonate with our listeners right now, who somebody may feel like you do Shannon. I can’t spend the money to delegate. How is this possible? And there’s others who are big dreamers who were like, of course, I’m going to spend all the money.

Lisa Zeeveld:

And so the one thing that I want to say though, is that you guys were able to come together and really cast a vision. And so for me, as an emerging leader, I wanted to be a part of something really awesome and great. And I think that that’s what you both did really, really well. Is you cast a vision around the idea, the business that you wanted to create. And so it was really easy for me to have passion and drive and want to work hard because I knew why I was working hard.

Lisa Zeeveld:

What are some perhaps tips that you could help our entrepreneurs out there who don’t even know how to put it out in the universe? What are some great things that you could tell them about how to create that vision in order to get out of that space and create these strategic plans?

Michael Hyatt:

Well, there’s a number of elements that are involved in strategic planning, but the first and most important, the foundation of everything else is your vision. And in fact, I call it a vision script. So in my newest book, The Vision Driven Leader, I outlined this in detail. But so often people think that, you know, they’ve got to have a vision statement, you know, some short, pithy, super clever thing that you could put on a t-shirt, you know, or, you know, put as a motto in your, in your lobby. That’s not going to be robust enough to really drive kind of execution and to drive, drive the vision forward for your business. So I talk about a vision script. And what I mean by that is that it’s a short document, three to five pages in length. It outlines a clear, attractive, practical, and inspirational version of your future. It’s written in the present tense as though it’s already happened. And it describes the reality is you see it three to five years from now.

Tricia Sciortino :

So it gives you the light. Your leading light, where you plan to go.

Michael Hyatt:

And most people don’t know how to do this because it’s not taught in college. I couldn’t find a single college or university that had a course on vision. There’s only a couple of books on it. And most people mistake vision for mission, but this is really about designing the future. And so I had the book set up and I talk about a vision script about having four different categories that you really need to envision.

Michael Hyatt:

First of all, the future of your team, what does your team look like three to five years from now? What does your product development or your service offerings look like three to five years from now? What is your marketing look like three to five years from now? And what impact are you having three to five years from now? So those four categories, and for us, it’s strategic planning.

Michael Hyatt:

And the first time you do this, it’s the most involved takes the most work. But once you lay the foundation, it pretty much stays the same. Now I just, I want to contrast vision with strategy. This is an important distinction. Strategy, I mean, it doesn’t usually change every day but it could change every day, because vision is the what, that’s where you’re going, right? And as a leader, you have no business leading unless you know where you’re taking people. So that’s why vision is so incredibly critical as a leader, you’ve got to be able to articulate where it is that you’re going. Strategy is how you get there.

Daniel Tardy:

The organization is always going to move at the speed of trust. Stephen Covey told us that the power of trust and how much it dictates the speed at which an organization can move and can scale. So how is trust built? Well, it’s built through relationships. Well, how do you build a relationship? Well, you build it through communication. And so it’s weird cause we get into the business world and we think, okay, I’ve, we’ve had the staff meeting, so I’ve checked the communication box. So we don’t have to talk to anybody again until the next staff meeting.

Daniel Tardy:

But think about your social life. Think about who you build relationships and your social life. You know, you don’t have a to-do list that says call my friend every third Wednesday and make sure that I’ve checked it. No, you just, I’m thinking about you. Hey, I’m checking in. How are you doing? How are your kids doing? You know, because you have a relationship with that person.

Tricia Sciortino :

I think it’s so important. Like you say that most leaders realize that the relationship part that they have with their teams and employees is what’s what gives them the grounds to have influence. And to your point, not be just directing workflow or directing feedback, but the relational part and the communication part is what, what gives us great influence in which makes people want to work for you as a leader?

Daniel Tardy:

Absolutely. And you know, John Maxwell defines leadership as just that influence. I think about what creates influence with your team. When you hire somebody and you sign their paycheck, you’ve got the title of the boss and they’ve got the title of the employee. You’ve got some influence, but it’s the influence of I’m going to fire you if you don’t do what I said, that’s only going to get you about 15% of the potential out of that person. The other 85% comes from them seeing that you have a heart.

Daniel Tardy:

That you care about them. You’re interested in who they are, not just professionally, but also personally, and that you’re actually connecting with them and building relationships so that they’re interested in your advice. They’re interested in, not just, what did you tell me I have to do, but “Hey, could you mentor me? I’m struggling with this.” They feel safe actually coming to you with their problems. And they’re not going to get smacked because you’re the boss and they’re that. But no, this is my friend. This is somebody I can trust.

Tricia Sciortino :

Right? And they want to do great work for you. You know, I find that right. We, we have great relationships here at Belay and we’ve seen that our team wants to rise up and do well for the leadership because we have such great relationships that they want to serve us well and serve the organization. Well, because we have a kindred relationship amongst everybody. So people really want to serve their leaders well when they have great relationships, friendships and love for their leader aside, I know that personally.

Daniel Tardy:

That’s the key and relationships are the difference between leading somebody, just from their head and actually leading to their heart. You know, when somebody brings their head and their heart to the equation, you’ve got the full person and you’ve got buy-in on the mission and it’s safe to do healthy conflict and a pushback and all the things that make a great team.

Daniel Tardy:

And again, all that starts with making it safe, to communicate by increasing the frequency of communication. And then we can talk in a minute about, but there’s different types of communication. There’s meetings, there’s texts, there’s certain one-on-one interactions you need to have. There’s group interactions, but suffice to say that at the end of the day, everything in your organization culturally is going to hinge on how well you do communication.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Belay provides staffing to help you grow your organization, whether you need a virtual assistant, bookkeeper, website specialist, or a social media strategist. They have the right team member for the hours you need ready to help you excel without the added stress of having to do everything on your own. Stop juggling, and start getting back to what only you can do growing your organization.Getting started is the easiest thing you’ll do today to find out more, just go to belay solutions.com/get-started.

Tricia Sciortino :

So Colleen, you talk a lot about entrepreneurs, executives, and managers who lead salespeople, how they kind of get stuck in what you refer to as the sales leadership insanity loop, by the way, I love that. Would you mind kind of talking to us about that, explaining it to us and really why is it so important?

Colleen Stanley:

Well, you know what I found in my years, not only being a former VP of sales, but also now for 20 years, working with sales teams is a lot of well-intended CEOs and sales managers are working on the wrong end of the sales performance issue. So let’s start with hiring top sales people now, rightly so, they’re going to be looking at what I call the hard skills. I often refer to this as a sales IQ. So do they have industry experience number of years of selling experience, but when you sit down and talk to a CEO or VP of sales as to why this hire didn’t work out, you never hear things like, well they weren’t prospecting or hitting quota, which, which is going to sound a little amazing for your audience today. You’ll hear things like bad attitude, wasn’t a good team-player bull in a China shop and didn’t care.

Colleen Stanley:

So it’s often they’re missing vetting for the soft skills, the very, very important skills that lead to retention in an organization. When you take a look at training and development. So myself included, I love training the hard skills, negotiation, prospecting, asking good questions, but when you really examine closer, why sales people aren’t demonstrating the right selling behaviors, it usually goes back to lack of development of a soft skill, EQ skills. That’s the insanity loop, where we’re actually having people. It’s the old diet and exercise program. I can go out and run 10 miles. But if I come back and eat a bag of chips, which I love chips, I’m not going to do much good. Right?

Tricia Sciortino :

Donuts. Can we have donuts?

Colleen Stanley:

So we’re actually working on 50% of the success equation in many sales organizations.

Tricia Sciortino :

So why is it so important to then get out of that loop?

Colleen Stanley:

Well, if you like big headaches and big bruises, that’d be your first reason there. But, I’m particularly say in these tough business environments where everything’s getting more competitive. You have a lot of industries where there’s the commoditization factor happening faster and quicker. You really don’t have the luxury of being average. I don’t think you’ve ever had the luxury of being average, but today’s business environment is not kind to average sales people, average sales organizations. So my team is only equipped with 50% of the skills. They’re probably not going to win a hundred percent of the business that they could or should. So it’s really giving them a hundred percent of the skills to be successful, not only in sales, but in life.

David Farmer:

I think any business leader needs to always have a portfolio of new ideas because there’s this sense that even if you’re thriving right now, nothing lasts forever. And there’s a life cycle to products. There’s a life cycle to services. In fact, look at what’s happened with COVID. We’ve seen the life cycle of some things come to an abrupt end. And so, I think leaders, they’re always kind of dealing with what’s now. And sometimes they’re looking at it a little bit, but they’ve also got to look way out into the future and learn to sort of read the weak signals. Where does change come from? What’s going to potentially disrupt my business? That’s sort of a defensive posture, but also what’s the next big opportunity I might want to pursue? That’s the offensive nature of it. And then they can almost have a portfolio of projects.

David Farmer:

Some are ready to go. And some they’re ideas at this point. And I kind of think about like your pantry in your kitchen. You want some stuff it’s on the shelf and it’s, you’ve already tested it. You’ve validated. It’s ready to go when you need it. And other stuff you’re just really on the front end. And then I would say do a little honest assessment of what is in your innovation pantry right now, or your book, as you said. Are you vulnerable? Or do you need to get cranking on some new ideas? And just to share a little story from a Chick-Filet. We obviously had no idea that the world was going to turn upside down, but that second, third week in March, where the close all of our dining rooms, and we were able to quickly pivot all of the service at our free-standing restaurants, either drive through curbside pickup or delivery.

Daymond John:

And we were able to push people to use an app that we had been developing. Now, we had been working on all those things for a while, but had no idea that they would pay off like they did during this season. And we saw the way that people use them, just sky-rocket up. And so we, we benefited from having already done that. So I would say to listeners, you’ve got to adopt this mindset that nothing static, and you kind of have to walk around with it. It’s almost like you got a little chip on your shoulder, this healthy discontent with status quo, even if life’s awesome right now, it may not always be that way.

Tricia Sciortino :

The shoe’s going to drop at some point or another.

David Farmer:

For all of us right?

Tricia Sciortino :

Just plan on it.

David Farmer:

Yeah. I mean the world, the marketplace is so dynamic and unlike ever before, it’s changing.

Tricia Sciortino :

What is the real culprit? What is preventing leaders from winning at both work and

Megan Hyatt Miller:

Life at the same time? Well, this is like literally the million dollar question. You know, this is the question that our clients ask us all the time. It’s the question that we see in the media all the time. And most of us have asked ourselves. And I think it’s a couple of things. I mean, first of all, we live in a culture of overwork. A cult really, if you get down to it, where we think about work as our primary orientation for life, it’s where we measure our success. And we really think that work-life balance is a myth. I think it’s impossible to achieve work-life balance and what we call the double win, winning at work and succeeding at life, unless you believe it’s possible.

Megan Hyatt Miller:

And so I think we’re getting this enormous cultural pressure to overwork. And we really don’t believe it’s possible because unfortunately there are not a lot of good examples around us where we can look at somebody’s life that we respect and say, oh, they’re doing it. You know, they’re really doing it. Instead, what we see is the glorification of overwork and people like Elon Musk and others who are sleeping on the couch in their office and ignoring their five kids and just abandoning a lot of, a lot of things outside of work. And I, and I think the consequences of that are tragic really to our potential professionally, but also of course, to everything that’s important outside of work.

Tricia Sciortino :

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino :

So really the biggest thing is people not actually believing it to be reality.

Colleen Stanley:

I think that, that’s what I hear most often from our clients and that’s really our mission to change their mind.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. I love that. So you’re saying it’s not a myth and that intentionality with the right planner. [crosstalk 00:21:29] The full focus planner that you can actually have that balance. I know now one of the cool buzzwords is integration. Do you find that it’s more of an integration than a balance? What’s your take on that?

Megan Hyatt Miller:

Well I think, when people say balance, sometimes what they mean by that is an equal time spent at work and at home. And I think that’s a kind of rigidity that doesn’t really ring true to most of us. I think if you think more about it, like a balancing act of walking on one of those slack lines, like my teenagers like to tie between trees at the park and you see them walking and they’re kind of adjusting their weight side to side, you can’t see me, I’m rocking my body side. Some of you are watching. I know, but not everybody. And I think that’s a lot more like real life where you’re kind of making these micro adjustments all the time, but I have to tell you, I really think it starts with vision.

Megan Hyatt Miller:

If you know anything about Michael Hyatt and company, you know, that we are passionate about vision and part of the reason we’re so passionate about this double win concept of winning at work and succeeding at life is because we feel like it’s part of a well-rounded vision for your life and a well-rounded vision for your company. And so that’s really where it starts.

Lisa Zeeveld:

Man, what a fun walk down memory lane and what an amazing journey this past year has been! I hope you are enjoying the One Next Step as much as we are! It’s been so much fun to make this for you guys! If you haven’t already, we would love for you to subscribe to the podcast so you never miss an episode.

Tricia Sciortino :

Thank you for listening and joining us for our first 50 episodes. I can’t believe we’re here. Thanks to our guests for generously sharing their time and wisdom with us. Also, thank you, thank you, thank you, to our team for their hard work in bringing this podcast to you every week. See you next week for another great episode of the One Next Step.

Speaker:

Thanks for listening to One Next Step. Be sure to subscribe on Apple podcasts or follow us on Spotify. Then, join us next time for more practical business tips and tools to help you get more done, grow your business, and lead your team with confidence. For more episodes, show notes, and helpful resources, visit onenextsteppodcast.com.

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