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About This Episode

Sometimes being pushed in a different direction can turn out to be the biggest blessing of our lives and careers. That’s exactly what happened to Steven Carse, one of the brains behind King of Pops – the delicious popsicles. King of Pops all started as a conversation in Central America. Over the years, that conversation and dream turned into a reality.

 

Steven was laid off from his corporate job during the Great Recession so it was on to a new dream for him. A few months later, Steven’s brother left his job as a lawyer to join the family business. Now, not only does King of Pops want to provide good food, but Steven and his brother are relentless community supporters and strive to generate unexpected moments of happiness for everyone they encounter. Today Steven Carse joins us to talk about growing a business from the ground up.

 

Your One Next Step

Go download our activation guide: “Steven Carse on Grassroots Branding & Marketing,” which includes some of Steven’s best tips on marketing and branding. Steven and his team have built one of the most beloved brands and best popsicles in America, King of Pops. As a bonus, King Of Pops has generously included a special offer to their online store. (Yes, they ship popsicles now!)

 

Download Now

 

In each episode, we highlight one next step for you and provide an activation or delegation guide to help you immediately take action, start applying what you learn, and get your team to help you.

1. Use the pandemic season as a lesson moving forward.

The team at King of Pops developed a neighborhood partnership program this year in which out of state customers could sell popsicles in their local communities. Needless to say, we’ve all had to adapt in 2020, but what can we take from this time when it’s all over? Some of our changes may only work during a time like this, but some of our changes might be adaptable with our old business model. Always be looking for ways to learn and improve.

2. The best marketing is authentic marketing.

The King of Pops developed its brand using wholesome, gritty grassroots marketing. What can you learn from that approach? It’s easy to look at big brands like Apple and Starbucks and think you want to be that size one day. But, at the same time, people are craving for human connection, especially right now. They are looking for authenticity and genuineness. It’s okay if your brand doesn’t look and “feel” perfect. That’s relatable. None of us are perfect. Use your marketing to build connections and relationships by letting people know who you are and getting to know them.

3. Create unexpected moments of happiness.

We’re stealing this from The King of Pops because it’s so good. In other words, find special ways to make your customers smile, ways that they didn’t see coming. That might be a really big smile yourself, a special gift, or just simply going out of the way to do something they never expected you to do. Kindness goes a long way toward building brand loyalty.

How has your business fared in 2020? What’s been the most important thing you’ve learned? In what ways have you had to pivot?
What lessons will you take from this time once the pandemic is over?
What are some ways your business could create unexpected moments of happiness for your customers and clients?
How could a grassroots marketing approach work for you?

Grassroots is all about figuring out how to connect with individual people.

Steven Carse

The most effective marketing is a one-on-one conversation.

Steven Carse

Your business is about serving other humans and so you need to be human.

Lisa Zeeveld

Some of the most valuable lessons in grassroots marketing come in having to
pivot.

Tricia Sciortino

(03:03) Steven talks about his elf name and King of Pops Christmas tradition. (pre-Covid) of delivering Christmas trees while dressed as elves.

(04:51) How has the pandemic affected King of Pops’ business?

(07:15) Steven talks about how being authentic has played into their marketing in 2020.

(09:14) How would you define “grassroots marketing?”

(11:04) What about your brand makes it so appealing to so many people, almost with a cult following?

(14:51) How King of Pops will be moving forward with the lessons learned during the pandemic once it’s over.

(16:59) Fundamental differences between branding and marketing.

(19:15) Creating “unexpected moments of happiness.”

(21:15) Your business is to serve other humans, so you need to be a good human.

(26:03) Go download our activation guide: “Steven Carse on Grassroots Branding & Marketing,” which include some of Steven’s best tips on marketing and branding. As a bonus, King Of Pops has generously included a special offer to their online store!

Steven Carse:

All of that is grassroots and it’s just that it’s kind of the decision that you make. Are you going to take out an ad in big media conglomerate? Are you going to spend that same money figuring out how to connect with individual people?

 

Speaker 2:

Welcome to One Next Step, the most practical business podcast in the world, helping you get more done, grow your business and lead your team with confidence with tips and tools you didn’t get in business school. Here are your hosts, Tricia Sciortino and Lisa Zeeveld.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Welcome to One Next Step, the practical business podcast that helps you run your business and make it stop running you so you can enjoy your work and your life. I’m Tricia Sciortino, the CEO of BELAY.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

I’m Lisa Zeeveld, the COO of BELAY. Together, we are T and LZ. We’ve known each other since 2005 and have had the privilege of working together for almost a decade. We’ve grown a 100% remote business from startup to being recognized on the Inc. 5000 Fastest Growing List of Companies for six years running.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

LZ and I have learned a lot along the way and have made some great friends and partners. For the One Next Step, we are cashing in some favors to bring you episodes filled with excellent content delivered by some talented people and we may have a thing or two to add ourselves. The One Next Step is here to help you on your leadership journey.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s right and each week we release a new episode, answering your questions about running an organization. We will always highlight one next step for you to take immediate action and we’ll also include an activation guide that reinforces what you’ve heard today.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

So every new business must start from the ground up. Branding and marketing are essential to growing and maintaining a successful organization. Today, we are joined by Steven Carse. Steven is the brains behind King of Pops. Have you ever had one of their popsicles, LZ?

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

I have and I love them.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

They are amazing. King of Pops all started as a conversation in Central America. Over the years, that conversation and dream turned into a reality. Steven was laid off from his corporate job during the great recession, so it was on to a new dream for him. A few months later, Steven’s brother left his job as a lawyer to join the family business.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Wow, isn’t it amazing how things work out? Sometimes being pushed in a different direction can turn out to be one of the biggest blessings of our lives and careers. Not only does King of Pops want to provide good food, but Steven and his brother are relentless community supporters and really strive to generate unexpected moments of happiness for everyone they encounter. Wow, that’s so cool. Listen in, as we talk to Steven Carse about growing a business from the ground up.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Welcome to the podcast, Steven.

 

Steven Carse:

Thanks. I’m excited to be here.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

We are excited to have you. Before we get into the juicy goodness of all things marketing, I would love to ask you to share something interesting or fascinating about yourself. You have a fun story, fun fact, fun experience you’d like to share with our audience?

 

Steven Carse:

Oh man. Well, it is being recorded Christmas time, December 1st, typically if it was a non-COVID year, we would be in elf outfits delivering Christmas trees, which is what our business typically morphs into for the holidays since people are not buying quite as many pops.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s really good.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

No popsicles in December.

 

Steven Carse:

The interesting fact would be my elf name is Chimney the Elf.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Oh, okay. You can’t just leave us hanging like that. Why Chimney.

 

Steven Carse:

I don’t really know. Everyone has an elf name. That’s what we answered the phone with, our elf name. It just seemed kind of like oxymoron-ish. I don’t know, opposite of what an elf, you would think. So I don’t know. I don’t smoke so I don’t know anymore.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Why Christmas trees? How did you morph from pops to trees?

 

Steven Carse:

Yeah, we were trying to think of a business that was not during the popsicle season and Christmas trees were it. So we delivered Christmas trees in elf outfits and normally, I would have been saying, “Go right on over to treeelves.net to order,” but it’s a different year this year. I’m just going to tell you a secret, I’m kind of enjoying not schlepping around Christmas trees.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Dressed as Chimney the Elf.

 

Steven Carse:

Yep.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well, next year I’m going to have to watch out for that and order a tree. Does Chimney deliver my tree?

 

Steven Carse:

Oh, yeah. Chimney, Taco, I think there’s all kinds of great elves out there.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

That’s awesome.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

That’s so awesome. I like it.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well, you kind of opened this up for me then. So specifically speaking about King of Pops and what you’ve been doing there, really, how has the pandemic affected your business and how you guys have been operating?

 

Steven Carse:

I can remember when the pandemic started to become a reality, just feeling such a ‘woe is me’ feeling because we sell at large events and we sell to corporate gatherings and weddings. For some reason, I felt like we were the one business that was going to be impacted early, early on. Then, as things happened, you started to see the reality that this is just going to affect literally everybody and the vast majority of businesses negatively. But for us, pretty much a third of our business is catering, which is going to corporate events or activations for corporate events or weddings or bar mitzvahs and that stuff’s all gone.

 

Steven Carse:

Then, another third of our business is going to events like large music festivals or down to farmer’s markets and such and that pretty much went away. So we were down to wholesale, which is our last third. They always say you want to have a diversified business, so in that way we were lucky. So also, we’re in about 600 stores. Our largest customer is Whole Foods and some of that piece of our business, even like Stone Mountain and event areas like the Braves and stuff like that was down. But thank goodness for the little bit of grocery that we had and there’s not a nice way to say it. It’s been a challenging year for selling gourmet popsicles. Let’s just put it at that.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Sure. When I think that you probably are sharing some sentiments that a lot of our listeners are feeling-

 

Steven Carse:

No doubt.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

… in the moment. So thank you for being transparent and real. I know that we all appreciate that.

 

Steven Carse:

Of course.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

I know. So then it feels like a really hard shift to go talk about marketing, but I think, when you look at, okay, so you’re in this during this place where two-thirds of your business is really kind of off the table and you’re focused on your one-third that’s viable for you at this time. Then I know really, your expertise in truly grassroots marketing and the effects that the pandemic can have on it or not. I’d love to get your thoughts on marketing in the new day and age and maybe what you guys have done or are going to do from that perspective.

 

Steven Carse:

I think a little bit, you guys just hit on, was the transparency. That’s been something that’s been important to us from the beginning. When we started our business, we kind of invited people in to be a part of it with us and I think for that reason, people kind of cheer for our brand a little bit more than they might just another food item. So we share what it feels like to have to let go of someone that has worked closely with you for six years that you care deeply about and consider them a friend. We talk about what it’s like to pivot to E-com and how we can try to make that work from a popsicle business and then really each of those pieces is, I don’t know if marketing is such a interesting word, but it’s certainly grassroots and authentic.

 

Steven Carse:

I think those are the two things that we’ve always focused on is just telling a true story and letting people say what they will about that. The challenges and the difficulties of making a beautiful Nike or Apple-esque advertising campaign are really just so far out of the reach of so many brands that are in the one to $10 million range that I think it’s really kind of the only really option you can do is just to try to connect with them in your advantages that you aren’t that big and that you are able to respond to comments on Instagram or like someone else’s post if they’re talking about a challenge that they’re going through and relate it back to what you’re doing. So from the grassroots side, I think that’s where we are. You can’t fake it. It’s just you’re either doing it or not and if you’re sitting in a marketing meeting trying to think of how to appear as grassroots, that’s probably-

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Then you’re probably not grassroots. So I guess I would ask you if you had to define what grassroots marketing is, the definition of it, would you say authentic, organic, engaging? What are the words you would use to really capture somebody understanding what grassroots marketing is?

 

Steven Carse:

Gosh, I don’t know. I guess I’m thinking in my head right now, I know that there are people and maybe I’m thinking of what people consider guerrilla marketing that are doing things that maybe they are grassroots. They’re similar in nature, but at a different scale. But for me, grassroots marketing would have to do with your story, your brand story and getting whether it’s a, I think authentic is the right way to say it, an authentic look at kind of what that is. If it is 100% pretty, I don’t really know. I think we can all imagine the grittiness of it, but there has to be some imperfection within it.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

I was almost going to say when it’s so cropped and perfect and filtered, it feels like it’s fake.

 

Steven Carse:

I’ve heard that about Instagram posts now. I’ve heard that the Instagram posts have gotten so beautiful that now people are responding to things that are clearly not perfectly edited and are not filtered.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

I just did a #makeinstagramrealagain. I did that the other night, right? People want to see who you are.

 

Steven Carse:

Yeah, for sure.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

If I think back to your journey and King of Pops and just sort of this phenomenon that came out of nowhere, I would be in a meeting and people were talking about we, as an organization, brought you guys in. I’ve been at events and seen you, but there was almost this kind of crazy following that happened around it and kind of going from the pinnacle of that success and even in the pandemic, I think it’s that, or maybe that’s the question here, do you think it’s that people kind of look at you and it’s almost like you’re the brother or the best friend and they can be a part of it where they can’t be a part of a Ben & Jerry’s. There’s a familiarity to it.

 

Steven Carse:

For sure. I think people find success in our success, so a lot of when I’m speaking to college students or even our own staff, I’ll talk about I sat on the same corner for three years and people came up and I didn’t know who they were and some of them were influential and some of them were famous and I was bad at knowing if people were famous or not. Some of them were just neighbors, but were people that we bank with I met there. I didn’t know they were bankers at the time. Buyer for Whole Foods was a customer and I didn’t know he was a buyer at Whole Foods.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Oh wow.

 

Steven Carse:

So all of these things over time just culminated and I guess grassroots marketing can mean all of these things, but in a way, that was marketing. There’s a very ineffective and not scalable way, but you can’t do a better job than a one-to-one conversation and that maybe that’s sales and that’s a different thing. I don’t really know, but to me, it feels like from the very beginning, something we did, and I honestly don’t know exactly what it was other than just being kind of oversharing that people wanted us to succeed and wanted to help us succeed.

 

Steven Carse:

Oftentimes, that was like people suggesting a flavor, which we made a lot of and sometimes it could be annoying and sometimes it could be fun or it could be someone saying, “Hey, my friend has a parking lot in Buckhead that maybe you could set up a cart at,” or, “We’re having a concert,” or, “XYZ.” It could be a million things. Our story is really approachable. I was laid off from a kind of regular American big company and started this business. I guess another format of marketing, of grassroots marketing, is just the things that you’re doing and the actions that you’re taking.

 

Steven Carse:

So our response then was, “Hey, this is much different than my corporate job. Now I’m kind of out in the streets and I need to figure this stuff out.” Part of our response as a company when the pandemic did happen, was we realized that a lot of the same things that happened in 2008, 2009 recession were going to happen again. We wanted to create an opportunity to help people in a similar way and also help ourselves. So we never thought that we would have, we call them neighborhood partners, but essentially resellers that are out on our carts. We’ve always done that and held it very near and dear to ourselves.

 

Steven Carse:

But this year, it felt different and it felt like a good time to make that pivot. That’s been a really fun change that has, in a kind of grassroots marketing way, have been things that we can talk about. We have a partner in Augusta who works closely with her daughter and is teaching her about business. We’ve got a partner in New Jersey that just missed the South and this was the one thing that kind of reminded her of it and she goes and just sets up at the end of her driveway and has met a bunch of her neighbors that way and-

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Oh, that’s awesome.

 

Steven Carse:

All of that is grassroots and it’s kind of the decisions that you make. Are you going to take out an ad in big media conglomerate? Are you going to spend that same money figuring out how to connect with individual people?

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

I love that. So what do you feel like will remain the same? Hopefully, a year from now when we’re out of the pandemic, do you feel like the lessons that you’ve learned through this pandemic, are you going to bring with you?

 

Steven Carse:

Yeah, I think so. We’re 10 years in and I feel like it was a good reminder, other than our first couple of years when we were just starting, we felt really confident each year, we’re going to be profitable each year, we’re going to grow. I think this was just a reminder that nothing’s for sure.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Right.

 

Steven Carse:

When someone orders 100 pops and is willing to pay hundreds of dollars for them and have you come out and say thank you a little bit deeper I don’t know what the right adjective would be but all of that stuff has changed and we’re humans. We’re going to forget this in two years, what this feeling feels like, but there are certain things that you can kind of build into the business when you’re reminded. We’re really trying to do that at this point in time, when everything is so much scaled down. It’s a handful of people that are kind of keeping the business going whereas in years past, we had 300 people that would be out selling pops.

 

Steven Carse:

So just our ability to know each of those, we call them slingers, kind of well, it becomes difficult, but now we know what we didn’t like about that. When we rebuild, we can rebuild with those lessons in mind. So that is, again, coming back to the Neighborhood Partner Program, that’s a big piece of that is that these people are going to be able to connect with their, whether it’s their PTA or whatever nonprofit they’re involved in, or just the park that is down the street from them better than we could when we were selling kind of from an office where we were reaching out to people to the deltas of the world to say, “You guys going to hit your quota this year? Would you like to buy 8,000 pops?” It’s just a different feeling.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

Would you say there’s a fundamental or maybe what are the essential components of branding versus marketing? So if you were going to give advice to somebody listening right now and give them some kind of just fundamental tips and differences between what’s essential for branding right now, all things considered, versus essential for marketing, what would you advise somebody listening right now, who’s struggling to grow and market their business?

 

Steven Carse:

I guess in my mind, marketing feels like it can be less long-term. You can have a plan for a quarter in a year, whereas branding, you feel like maybe isn’t permanent, but it’s at least going to be sticking around for a long time. So you can do damage to your brand, but you probably can’t do it. You can’t ruin it, I don’t think, in one quarter. I’m sure if you tried you couldn’t.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

We all know our businesses have to have a social media presence. That’s a non-negotiable in today’s world. Today, social media moves fast sometimes at the speed of light if the headlines are compelling enough. So more and more businesses are hiring full-time strategists to handle the 24/7 influx of activity, engagements and opportunities.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

You know those menacing red number notifications and deafening pings and dings from your phone, tablet, computer? As prospects and customers alike all engaged with your social media, a BELAY Social Media Manager can handle that, or what about when you see no new notifications and instead are met with the deafening silence on all your social media accounts? Yep. You guessed it. A BELAY Social Media Managers can handle that too. Take your social media to the next level with an expert who can manage your social channels, engage with your audience and tackle your scheduling. Get started by visiting belaysolutions.com/services/social-media today.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well, Steven, one of the things that you are known for is that you would love to create unexpected moments of happiness. So I would love to hear a little bit more about that.

 

Steven Carse:

So we were having kind of an introspective moment, my brother and I, that who started the company with and we’re at kind of this point where we had people maybe interested in investing and most of that about a year or two after we found some success we just thought a lot about, “Why are we doing this?” Or, “Why do we want to do this?” We were at an amazing place called ZingTrain where they teach a lot about purpose and how to apply that to your business. We realized what we thought was special about our business was something that was just incredibly simple and super easy to say and not always the easiest to do, but just to create unexpected moments of happiness.

 

Steven Carse:

So for us, that is something as simple as just handing someone a pop with a smile on a hot day or as convoluted as we had a Birthdays Aren’t Canceled surprise with Puddles the Clown this last year, where we went to a super fan’s house, he sang happy birthday and we gave him a bunch of fan pops, or like our yoga event, which is like a lot of people’s yoga event, but just a little bit, I don’t know. It just feels a little bit more, like the words we were using before, grassroots are authentic and there’s really no ulterior motive and you might get a popsicle at the end of it, but it’s just a piece of a moment that makes you feel happy.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

I love that. I love that and I think that that just speaks volumes to what you have created with King of Pops. I think that who we are hearing today in your transparency and authenticity is really how you’ve been able to grow this business. I think that’s really important for our listeners to hear that you need to be yourself and you need to be human, right? It’s so simple, but at the end of the day, if your business is about serving other humans and so you need to be human and just be a good one and I love that.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

You want to make people smile. To me, popsicles make me smile, so I think that anybody who gets a popsicle just immediately smiles, but I just love what you guys have been able to do. I think that sharing that with our listeners probably means a lot to them. I think you’ve given them a lot of good nuggets today on how to pivot and perhaps look at that third of your business that is doing well and just take away some lessons knowing that this isn’t going to last forever.

 

Steven Carse:

Yep. Exactly. It’s not going to last forever and we can build it back better and I think are the two pieces that helped me sleep at night through this tough time.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Well, this is awesome. Well, Steven, thank you so much for spending time with us today. This has been awesome and I know I’ve got a ton of stuff that I wrote down and can’t wait to share with my team.

 

Steven Carse:

Great. Thanks. I really appreciate you guys. Keep up the good work.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Oh my goodness. Steven really gave us some good stuff to think about today.

 

Tricia Sciortino :

Yes. It was a great education in grassroots marketing, for me, just his definition of really what it means and how it’s really helped him craft his business.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

What was your takeaway? What are you looking forward to sharing with our team?

 

Tricia Sciortino:

For me, it was really just how he’s going to leverage this time to use it as a lesson, right? So he talked a little bit about some different strategies they kind of had to consider since the pandemic. He talked about his neighborhood partners and really leveraging new marketing strategies to get his brand out there and that he would continue to use that going forward. So I think we’re all learning things through having to pivot where getting really creative on how to market our businesses and really remembering that, if and when things get back to normal or get back to a different place, that we’ll take those lessons with us. We will have learned a thing or two about what works, what doesn’t work, how to diversify. He talked about his business being a third, a third, a third, so I found that, they really just made it happen-

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yes.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

… which is kind of what we’re all doing. So I found that to be extremely interesting, fascinating information. So how about you?

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

I think it’s the whole grassroots branding and marketing thing and the authenticity behind it. I don’t know about our listeners or about you, but I think sometimes it’s really easy to look at big brands like a Target or Nike or Chick-fil-A or these big beautiful brands and you imagine yourself growing your business to that size. Yet, at the same time, people really are craving that human connection. There’s so much out there that’s perfect and you know that you’re not perfect and so you’re looking for something that feels very genuine and authentic just like you are.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

So that’s really what resonated with me with that grassroots marketing and branding is it’s making something that’s not perfect and it’s being authentic to tell your story. It’s having real connections and real relationships with your clients and your team members and so I think that’s really important, especially now, right? This year has turned out in a way that’s, it’s not what anybody thought it was going to be and it feels like the brands and the businesses that are being successful are the ones that have come out and said, “Hey, we need your help. We’re feeling it just like you’re feeling it.”

 

Tricia Sciortino:

I love that. I love that he really had a support system through his customer base of people who were just like you said, cheering them on because he created this very authentic, real brands that people could relate to, so being relatable and authentic.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

I personally relate to both of those words.

 

Tricia Sciortino:

I strive to be relatable and authentic and so that really does resonate with me even as a brand.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Yeah. Yeah. Those unexpected moments of happiness probably help. Well, you know what time it is, it is time for the One Next Step. As the most practical business podcast, we want to make sure taking action isn’t overwhelming to you. So with each episode, we’re going to offer you one next step to propel you and your business forward. Today’s next step is to download our activation guide. Steve Carse on grassroots marketing and branding, which are some of the best tips on marketing and branding from Steven himself. He and his team have built one of the most beloved brands and best popsicles in America, King of Pops. As a bonus, King of Pops has generously included a special offer to their online store. Yes, they ship popsicles now.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Who knew you could ship popsicles?

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

I know-

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Fascinating. So okay, guys. To download the guide now, text the phrase One Next Step to 31996 or visit onenextsteppodcast.com. When you request today’s guide, you’ll also receive a summary of today’s episode, which includes key quotes and takeaways and links to resources mentioned in the episode.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

Thank you so much for listening to this episode of One Next Step. We hope you enjoyed what you are hearing from us and we want to hear from you. Head on over to Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you listen and leave us a review. We created this podcast to help you and your team grow your business, so we read every one of them.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:

As we kick off the new year, we’d like to make sure the podcast is helpful to you. So submit your business questions so one of us or a future guest can answer them during an upcoming episode by calling the One Next Step listener line at 404-480-3003. That’s 404-480-3003. Until next time, own your journey. It’s your life and your business. It’s up to you to create the life and organization you want. Join us next week for more practical tips and actionable tools to advance your business one step at a time. Start by making today count.

 

Speaker 2:

Thanks for listening to One Next Step. Be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or follow us on Spotify, then join us next time for more practical business tips and tools to help you get more done, grow your business and lead your team with confidence. For more episodes, show notes and helpful resources, visit onenextsteppodcast.com.

Go download our activation guide: “Steven Carse on Grassroots Branding & Marketing,” which includes some of Steven’s best tips on marketing and branding. Steven and his team have built one of the most beloved brands and best popsicles in America, King of Pops. As a bonus, King Of Pops has generously included a special offer to their online store. (Yes, they ship popsicles now!)

 

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Thank you for listening to One Next Step.

Join us next week when we talk with Kendra Lewis, a hugely successful entrepreneur who overcame multiple obstacles, including homelessness, to graduate with three degrees, create multiple businesses, and work with some of the largest Fortune 500 companies in the world. However, working for a Fortune company was not her dream. Her mission was to work with small businesses and help entrepreneurs launch their ideas into the world. Next week Kendra will share with us her passion to transform small businesses.