Leadership

Reasons to Step Away from the New Shiny Tool

  Without fail, we’re constantly bombarded with gloating talk and viral articles about the next big idea that businesses must adopt. It could be a new device, a fresh enterprise software suite or even an emerging management philosophy. And while it’s understandable to find such potentialities enticing, here are some very good reasons to look…

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Without fail, we’re constantly bombarded with gloating talk and viral articles about the next big idea that businesses must adopt. It could be a new device, a fresh enterprise software suite or even an emerging management philosophy. And while it’s understandable to find such potentialities enticing, here are some very good reasons to look before you leap:

 

  • It’s too expensive.
    Yeah, it looks right, feels great and appears to do all that it promised, but you’ve run the numbers, and you just can’t justify the cost. You favor disruption, but not the kind that will seriously disrupt your capital.
  • If it ain’t broke . . .
    Your organization has used the same processes and systems for a recurring practice for the past several years – and it’s worked flawlessly without fail. Sure, what you’re being presented with is alluring. But beyond the novelty of it all, there’s no sound reason to change horses midstream.
  • The learning curve is steep.
    To really optimize this software requires tech skills you don’t have on staff. You need more coding and programming knowledge than you admit is feasible for your business – one that’s not even remotely in the tech or digital space.
  • It’s too new.
    No one likes being a guinea pig, but these days people seem to rejoice in being first! Nonetheless, while hearing a presentation about this next great tool, you find yourself asking, “What if . . .” or “How about . . .?” only to find your questions met with ambiguous or indefinite answers – or worse, talk of workarounds and future iterations.
  • It’s buggy.
    You signed up for a complimentary trial and are encountering all sorts of issues with the platform. It’s sluggish, it crashes, and you’re receiving system errors. Your log-ins work – sometimes, and the features so widely promoted aren’t reliably accessible.
  • It doesn’t play well with others.
    You’ve done your research and asked the right technical questions. And you know undoubtedly that this new device won’t work well with your existing assets. Interoperability is an issue, and making it really work will demand additional expenses and time for which you have neither the money nor the patience.
  • The ends don’t justify the means.
    In your company, trying something new may require Herculean efforts, especially if there’s a large outlay in dollars or investment of time. You know that seriously suggesting that your team or business try a new technology requires:

    1. Creating a proposal
    2. Presenting and pleading your case
    3. Finding or re-allocating budget dollars
    4. Developing a team training plan
    5. Assigning internal super users and admins
    6. Proving the value proposition after a pilot period . . . If the process to attempt new tech is so multi-layered, perhaps it’s better to hold off until you’re 100 percent sure it’s worth the work.
  • It won’t be relevant for long.
    This shiny new object seems perfect. It’s stylish, the interface makes you “ooh” and “ah,” and one of the top thought leaders you follow just endorsed it! But as your excitement softens, you begin to spot pragmatic problems. Fundamentally, you realize it addresses a very limited, micro capability that will do little for your daily efforts as a macro-thinking visionary.

 

 

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