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How to Make Better Decisions and Increase Your Influence

This week’s download is a free study guide and audio guide to Daniel’s book, The 7 Perspectives of Effective Leaders. Click the link below and input the code “BELAY21” as the receipt number.

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About This Episode

Every leader has to make important decisions. But the truth is, many leaders aren’t that great at it. 

 

In this episode, Daniel Harkavy, the CEO of Building Champions and leadership author, will help you understand his approach with the 7 perspectives of effective leaders – and how you can use that approach to help yourself, and your team, become better at decision making.

1. The best leaders are intentionally curious.

You can tell a man is wise not by the answers he gives but by the questions he asks. All of this stems from humility because good leaders realize they don’t have all the answers. They understand the value in their teams, and they hire them with that in mind.

2. The best leaders know that they aren’t supposed to be the smartest in the room.

They are supposed to surround themselves with the smartest people in the room. Their job is to hire the best people so they can get insightful input from their teams, asking “What do you think about this?” and “What should we do in this situation?” They are always looking for the right people to help make decisions.

3. The best leaders talk with their customers.

They sit down at the table and ask them questions. Whether it’s a restaurant owner, car dealer or doctor, good leaders are always asking what they can do better. They ask questions like, “What is our company about from your perspective?” or “What are we doing good, and what do you think our weaknesses are?”

 

What is your impression of Daniel Harkavy’s 7 Perspectives and how do you think you could use them?
Talk about Daniel’s view that the best leaders aren’t the smartest in the room. What is your opinion?
What does the perspective of the team and customer mean to your business?
Would you describe yourself as “intentionally curious?” If so, why? If not, what could you do to become more that way?

Really successful people ask some of the most profound questions.

Daniel Harkavy

Great leaders are intentionally curious so that they can get the information, make better decisions, and maximize influence.

Daniel Harkavy

You have to have a long-term vision that's both clear and compelling.

Daniel Harkavy

Understanding current reality is the starting point for any great leader.

Daniel Harkavy

(01:33) Daniel talks about his first job and being entrepreneurial at a young age.

(04:26) Daniel explains how he started Building Champions and what they do to help leaders. 

(07:50) What is the framework for Daniel’s book, The 7 Perspectives of Effective Leadership?

(09:08)The best leaders are intentionally curious. You can tell a man is wise not by the answers he gives but by the questions he asks.
(14:27) Perspective 1: Current Reality

(16:31) Perspective 2: Long-Term Vision

(17:45) Perspective 3: Strategic Bets

(20:10) Perspective 4: The Perspective of the Team

(22:22) Perspective 5: The Perspective of the Customer

(23:34) Perspective 6: Your Role

(25:17) Perspective 7: The Perspective of the Outsider

(27:55) What is a practical next step someone can take if they want to start moving toward these 7 perspectives?

(29:00) Where can our listeners connect with Building Champions and Daniel?

(31:25) This week’s download is a free study guide and audio guide to Daniel’s book, The 7 Perspectives of Effective Leaders. Visit 7Perspectives.com and input the code “BELAY21.”

Daniel Harkavy:

The best, most effective leaders are intentionally curious and that’s birthed out of this humility. They ask amazing questions. And there’s this saying that I love, and that is you can tell a man is wise not by the answers that he gives, but by the questions he asks. At a young age, I learned that really successful people ask some of the most profound questions.

Speaker 2:

Welcome to One Next Step, the most practical business podcast in the world, helping you get more done, grow your business, and lead your team with confidence with tips and tools you didn’t get in business school. Here are your hosts, Tricia Sciortino and Lisa Zeeveld.

Tricia Sciortino:

Hey guys, welcome to the One Next Step, the practical business podcast that helps you run your business so it stops running you, I’m Tricia. And today, we’re going to talk about a topic that’s incredibly important for every leader, what is effective leadership? And we have an expert guest joining this conversation today. Today, we have with us Daniel Harkavy who is the CEO and an executive coach at Building Champions. Daniel and his team have worked with thousands of clients and organizations to improve the way they lead and live. His most recent book, The Seven Perspectives of Effective Leadership, was released in October 2020. And we’re going to talk all about it today. Welcome, Daniel.

Daniel Harkavy:

Tricia, thank you for the lovely intro. It’s great to be with you and I look forward to our conversation.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. Yeah, me too. So thanks for joining us today. And I have a fun question to just get us started, an icebreaker, if you will. What was your first job?

Daniel Harkavy:

All right, so first job would have been, and my memory might be a little foggy because I was entrepreneurial from a really young age.

Tricia Sciortino:

Oh, that’s fun.

Daniel Harkavy:

So I think it all happened at the same time where I was mowing lawns, scooping dog poop, washing windows and stuffing pharmaceutical samples in a neighbor’s garage who is a pharmaceutical sales rep, and all of that would have been before teen years. So that would have been somewhere in that eight to 13 range. And then my first job where I got a W2. It was like, “All right, enough being paid cash under the table.” That would’ve been dishwashing at Danny’s Deli. I would ride my skateboard at the age 14, home from my house to the deli. And I would work there after school and on the weekends.

Tricia Sciortino:

So you’ve been a hard worker from very early on. You’ve been committed to it.

Daniel Harkavy:

Yeah, I’m weird. I’m really weird because the people that have journeyed with me, my wife and I have known each other since we were 11. And as a result of that, we have a lot of friends from those childhood days and we’ve journeyed together for decades. And so, yes, I’m a hard worker, but I’m also a surfer and therefore, I’ve got a free spirit side. When the swells come in, I want to be able to just leave and go surf. But I also enjoy if I’m going to work, I want to do good work.

Tricia Sciortino:

Well, I feel like that’s kind of the answer to work-life balance, or I feel like that’s the epitome of what every person strives to have, right? The ability to invest what they do in their work and do great work. But when the swells are calling your name to be able to step away and get some good surfing.

Daniel Harkavy:

There you go.

Tricia Sciortino:

So I love that. My girls actually surf, I never did. I always dreamed to surf and then I just got old and it never happened, although they challenge me today that I’m not too old to learn so we’ll see.

Daniel Harkavy:

You’re not too old. Come on.

Tricia Sciortino:

We’ll see. I don’t know.

Daniel Harkavy:

Well, you need to take them up on that challenge and get out there. It’s amazing.

Tricia Sciortino:

I know, but maybe you have better surf than me. You’re on the West Coast, right? You’re out in California.

Daniel Harkavy:

I’m actually. I grew up in California. First 30 years were in California and the last few decades plus have been up in Oregon.

Tricia Sciortino:

Okay.

Daniel Harkavy:

I wear a wetsuit and I surf in cold water.

Tricia Sciortino:

Okay, that’s even more challenging. I can’t complain now. They’re surfing in the warm waters of the Carolina, so.

Daniel Harkavy:

Yeah. You get out there. You’ll have fun.

Tricia Sciortino:

I’ll try it. Anyway, thanks for sharing that. I love that.

Daniel Harkavy:

Sure.

Tricia Sciortino:

Will you talk to us a little bit about Building Champions? Talk to us about how you go from surfing and doing dishes and working at the deli to now really being a true entrepreneur and owning and being the CEO of a business like Building Champions, which is really helping accelerate leaders in living their best lives.

Daniel Harkavy:

Yeah. So, the backstory before Building Champions was that from the age 20 to 30, I was in mortgage banking. And at the age 23, I was given my first opportunity to lead. I was promoted to branch manager and assistant vice president. And that went really well. And the reason it went really well was I had a knack for finding hard working, good, people with integrity. And I took my years of learning and success from 20 to 23. I had figured out this mortgage consulting business, the technical aspects, as well as the relational aspects. And I started looking for people that I could help.

Daniel Harkavy:

So I started recruiting in the areas around Los Angeles, which is where I was living at the time. And I attracted people that believed I could help them and I helped them. And really, what I was doing was I was coaching them. But at the time, I didn’t know that. I did that and really enjoyed it, and as a result of that enjoyment, I flourished. When I was 27, I was promoted to run all of production. So I had offices throughout the Western United States, hundreds of employees, teammates, branch leaders everywhere. And my job was to coach them.

Daniel Harkavy:

All right, fast forward to the age 30. Age 30, I’m married. I have three wonderful kids and I’m traveling through those Western United States a lot. And when you’re traveling day in and day out throughout the week, it starts to make work-life balance and the ability to be present difficult. So I decided to make a big move. When I was 30, I took a one year sabbatical. I left the company. I was being groomed to be CEO and I stepped away and just great people there and all. And in that one year, I moved from Southern California up here to Oregon. And I started Building Champions.

Daniel Harkavy:

So Building Champions is an executive coaching and leadership development company, 25 years old, celebrating our 25th anniversary next week. The team will be together out in Central Oregon having a summitbration, which is something we coined. And I’ll tell you how it is later.

Tricia Sciortino:

I like it.

Daniel Harkavy:

But yeah, we have coaches throughout the country that work with business leaders, not just here in the US, but we have clients everywhere and we help them to lead themselves, their teams and their organizations more effectively.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. I absolutely love that. There’s such a need for what you do. For any of our listeners out there, if you’re really looking for the right coach to come alongside you, I highly recommend you. You reach out to Daniel’s company.

Daniel Harkavy:

Thank you.

Tricia Sciortino:

BELAY has known you for many, many years. I’ve known you in prior from Michael Hyatt’s organization and things like that. You are so well known for what it is you do so I’m thrilled you’re here today and I’m even more excited to talk a little bit about your most recent book. So maybe let’s dive into and talk a little bit about the seven perspectives of effective leadership. Maybe you can share just like what the framework is of that book. And then we can talk through some just really great practical podcast coaching for some of our listeners today.

Daniel Harkavy:

You got it. Yeah, so I wrote this book as a result of creating a model with organizations and what I find to be liberating and very enjoyable is when I can work with business leaders who are dealing with a whole set of inputs and their situations are very complex. And the more complex they are usually, the more confusion and chaos and opportunity lies. So what I started doing was I started looking at my best leaders and I started to question what made them so effective. And what it came down to was these were leaders, and I’m going to give you some write down points because if you’re going to invest the time to listen to Tricia and I, I want to leave you with nuggets that will help you. My assumption is that you’re leading and that’s who I’m going to speak to as leaders.

Daniel Harkavy:

So the best leaders, and I’m talking about leaders who have done very successful startups. You mentioned BELAY so I’m going to talk about Bryan and Shannon. I’m going to talk about Michael Hyatt and then I’m going to talk about Martin Daum who leads Daimler Global out of Stuttgart, Germany. Or I’m going to talk about Tim Tassopoulos who leads Chick-fil-A or leaders at Bristol Myers Squibb or blah, blah, blah, right? The best, most effective leaders are intentionally curious and that’s birthed out of this humility. They ask amazing questions. And there’s this saying that I love, and that is, you can tell a man is wise not by the answers that he gives, but by the questions he asks.

Daniel Harkavy:

At a young age, I learned that really successful people ask some of the most profound questions. Now what they’re doing is they’re gathering all of these inputs so they can figure out how to put those inputs and information into a structure that enables them to help people. That’s what they’re doing. So intentional curiosity is the theme behind The Seven Perspectives of Effective Leaders. The most effective leaders understand that their effectiveness is determined by just two things, the decisions they make and the influences they have.

Daniel Harkavy:

And I’ve had years of conversations with leaders, many of them in the book, and I’ve asked them to challenge me. I’ve said, “Hey, do you believe this? Do you think that a leader’s effectiveness is determined by just decision making and influence?” And everybody thinks about it and they kind of nod and yeah, yeah, yeah. And some will challenge it and then we get into deep conversations. But there are 20 plus leaders in the book ranging from Frank Blake who’s the chairman of Delta. He was the CEO of Home Depot, great leader, amazing. Horst Schulze who was one of the co-founders and COO of Ritz-Carlton Hotels and Capella, amazing.

Daniel Harkavy:

All of these amazing men and women who lead really, really well. And every one of them said, “You’re right. It’s just decision making and influence.” All right, that’s the premise. So then what I did was I said, how do we elevate and improve decision making and influence? What is it that leaders are doing with their time in their days? What do their rhythms and routines look like? And since I’ve had the privilege of journeying with them for the past 25 years as their executive coach, I’ve got a front row seat. I get to watch, I get to ask and I get to then put it into a framework. So I say there are seven perspectives all of these leaders are intentionally curious in so that they can get the information, make better decisions and maximize influence.

Tricia Sciortino:

That is profound. And I’m sitting here thinking about how I’m going to challenge you as my dog’s barking. Because this is life …

Daniel Harkavy:

It’s the world we live in.

Tricia Sciortino:

… and sometimes we’re podcasting and the UPS delivery man shows up because maybe you’re addicted to ordering on Amazon.

Daniel Harkavy:

Yeah.

Tricia Sciortino:

So as we talk about those two main areas, you then break it down into different lanes or different perspectives. Is that what you would call them inside of that framework?

Daniel Harkavy:

Yeah, there are seven different perspectives you need to see your business from. And they’re not a one and done, they’re a constant. So when you look at your week as a leader, you want to ask yourself if you have discipline and intentional curiosity time in five of the perspectives, for sure. And they will impact your sixth perspective. And then you need that seventh perspective to help you to make sense of it all. And yes, I will unpack all of the perspectives because people are going, “All right-“

Tricia Sciortino:

Well, that was going to be my next question. And then the importance of them, right? Or do they all hold equal value?

Daniel Harkavy:

They do. Yeah. If you neglect any, you will not be as effective as you could.

Tricia Sciortino:

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Lisa Zeeveld:

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Daniel Harkavy:

So this model I’ve been working with organizations with, like I said, for years, I started it in 2014. So we’re seven years later when we’re recording this in organizations here in the US and abroad and it used to be five perspectives.

Tricia Sciortino:

Oh, okay.

Daniel Harkavy:

And it grew to six. And then it grew to seven and I was going to write the book at five and I didn’t have peace. And then I was going to write it at six and I was like, “Nope, we’re not there.” And when the seventh hit, I was like, “Okay, seven’s perfection. Let’s go.”

Tricia Sciortino:

You’re really teasing it out now, yeah.

Daniel Harkavy:

So perspective one is current reality. And I want you to think about as a leader, that term ivory tower leader. Where’s that come from? Well, that comes from years and years of leaders sitting in their ivory tower, barking out orders, making decisions, but they’re disconnected from the people on the ground. So therefore, the quality of their decisions will not be excellent. And they have no influence because everyone’s walking around going, “Nah, guy’s a dipstick, ivory tower leader.”

Tricia Sciortino:

He doesn’t actually know what he’s talking about.

Daniel Harkavy:

Doesn’t know what he’s talking about so we have to go around and spend half of our day cleaning up his or her mess. Current reality, you have to have both feet firmly planted in the mechanics of the business. The best leaders understand the business. They understand what got them to this point, what worked, what didn’t work.

Daniel Harkavy:

They understand all the key levers, the inputs, the metrics. They understand what optimizes the business. They understand how the business works and how to make it win in its current time. Great leaders, current reality is the starting point on their GPS. If you don’t have that dialed, well, then, getting to a better destination is going to be difficult because your starting point, you don’t see it right.

Daniel Harkavy:

Now, if you’re grounded in current reality, then your teammates know, she understands the business. She gets it. She understands the mechanics. She understands the functions. She understands how to make it work. Therefore, influence increases because they’re not worried about you being ivory tower. Okay? You’re going to make better decisions because you understand it. But that in itself does not enable you to be an effective leader. It enables you to be an effective manager. That’s today. That’s current reality, right?

Tricia Sciortino:

Right.

Daniel Harkavy:

That’s history. Maybe that’s a year ahead, but you’re managing. Perspective two. Perspective two’s long-term vision. You have to have a vision that’s both clear and compelling. Clear enough to build plans from. Compelling enough to cause you to want to take risks. Because if it doesn’t cause you, leaders, to want to take risks, why would you think it would cause your teammates to want to engage and take risks? It has to cause you to get excited, your palms to sweat. Clear enough to plan from, compelling enough to cause you to take risk.

Daniel Harkavy:

Why is that important? Well, if you don’t have a clear destination, a better tomorrow, well then, where are you leading your team to? And how do you build strategy? If you don’t have a win, a future destination, how are you going to define a win and then build strategy?

Daniel Harkavy:

So what happens is you’re grounded in current reality, perspective one. You throw an anchor out to perspective two, and you begin pulling the organization towards that better vision. It creates a gap because this is where we are today. And that’s where I’d love us to be or we would love to be when we engage our team in this in five, 10 years.

Daniel Harkavy:

Now that gap is where perspective three comes in. Those are strategic bets. You make these strategic bets, not too many of them, because then you’ll fail to execute. But these strategic bets, you’re betting that these strategies will pay off and move you from current reality to future state. So you resource them, you build the gates so that you know whether you’re on track or off track. You appoint the right leaders. You have rhythms and meetings and teams just around those bets that are different than the meetings that you have when you’re running the business week in and week out.

Daniel Harkavy:

You allow for more creativity, more inputs. They’re different. They’re bets because they’re not always going to pay off. They might turn out differently than you thought. But great leaders are always making strategic bets because great leaders are always moving a group of people, an organization, to a better tomorrow.

Tricia Sciortino:

Right. Nobody wants to sit in the same place.

Daniel Harkavy:

Yeah. Like they’re not comfortable with status quo. Now, this is really relevant, leaders, because in 2020 and 2021, a lot of leaders have faced some immense challenges, headwinds and tailwinds. Tailwinds, your business exploded. You had no idea that you would be the recipient of such demand and favor, but your challenge is capacity. Your challenge is how do you continue to resource? And maybe your supply chain’s breaking, maybe your teammates are maxed, maybe recruiting and retention is difficult, which is difficult for many today.

Tricia Sciortino:

I think you’re talking to me.

Daniel Harkavy:

Or it’s immense headwinds where your business just got kicked in the teeth. You’re in hospitality, you’re in hotel, you’re in travel. You’re in, who knows? Right? So challenged. Well, if you’re looking at your business from these three perspectives, what you’re doing is you’re breathing hope into you because perspective two is an instrument. It’s like a fog buster in an airplane that’s in the fog. You have to, as a pilot, be able to trust those instruments or your plane’s upside down. Everyone’s in danger.

Daniel Harkavy:

Well, leaders, that second perspective, that’s that instrument, fog buster panel. And it enables you to pull the right levers, place the right strategic bets so that you land where you want to land.

Daniel Harkavy:

Perspective four is the perspective of the team. This one’s been challenged over the last year and a half. “Hey, Tricia, what do you think about the business? What do you need? How are you doing? What would you do if you were me? What do you think we need to do or see that we’re not doing or seeing right now?” See, the best leaders know their job isn’t to be the smartest in the room. It’s to surround themselves with the smartest they can.

Daniel Harkavy:

If you surround yourself with the smartest people you can, well then, you want to know what they think, right? You want to know.

Tricia Sciortino:

That’s why you did it in the first place.

Daniel Harkavy:

Right.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah.

Daniel Harkavy:

Now, if you think you’re the smartest person in the room, you could give a rip about what other people think. And then we have to talk about, well, why’d you hire these people? The best leaders, they know their job is to surround themselves with the best. So then they’re intentionally curious and they’re asking their teammates, what do you need, what do you see, what do you think, what am I missing, what should we do? They’re taking all of that. Then they’re looking for the right person to make the decision who has the D.

Daniel Harkavy:

I learned this from the CEO of Infineum Petroleum, probably 15 years ago. Infineum Petroleum headquartered in the UK, owned by Shell and Exxon Mobil, a brilliant leader. One of the most respected leaders that I had worked with. Easily, 15 years ago, Dominique Fournier from Marseilles, France. And he would always with his executive team, Who’s going to make the D? Who’s the one to make the D?” So good. He understood. He’s not the one that needs to make every D. He needs to make some Ds that are big, right?

Daniel Harkavy:

But if we’re talking about the customer experience, if we’re talking supply chain, if we’re talking finance, if we’re talking marketing or whatever it may be, he’s looking to the right leader or he’s looking through the organization to find out who needs to make the D and he’s pushing decisions down as low as he can with Ds to where people actually understand the consequences of it. They understand the inputs and they’ll own the outcome.

Daniel Harkavy:

All right. Well, if you’re not intentionally curious, and if you’re not asking your teammates, you won’t know who should make the D. All right, the next perspective is the perspective of the customer. Oftentimes leaders are trusting SurveyMonkey or their internal surveys or reports that are all lagging. And the questions were asked in such a way to get certain outputs. The best leaders sit down and break bread with heir customers. And again, in the last year and a half, that’s been difficult, but you need to sit down with your customers.

Daniel Harkavy:

What do you need? What’s it like to do business with us? Where are we falling down? What do you wish we could do differently? What do you see for your business in the years ahead? And if you’re in the B2C business, well, right, customer. What’s it like to do business with us? What do we need to do? What do we need to change? How can we best serve you going forward? The best leaders are sitting down in the restaurants, in the truck with the person buying their truck. They’re with the patient. They’re there and they’re asking.

Tricia Sciortino:

That’s a good one. I mean, that’s a good one to have a gap in. It’s a scary one to have a gap in.

Daniel Harkavy:

And you have to. You have to be curious and be looking at where your customers are today and where they’re going. The next perspective is the sixth perspective, which is your role. Once you have all of these five inputs, how do you need to now function? Is what you’re doing truly the most effective. What are you considering to be your high payoff activities? How are you allocating your time?

Daniel Harkavy:

These first five perspectives inform how you should function Monday through Friday. And then, you keep all of the good disciplines, you keep the good projects that you and you alone should do. And then you delegate and you coach others to take what they should be doing so that they can win in their roles. But you need to understand what your role is. And oftentimes the work we do, I have 25 plus coaches that are working with hundreds of leaders every single week in one-on-one coaching sessions and team engagement. In all of it, much of what we’re doing is we’re working with leaders on how they think about their role, what they believe about their opportunity in the role, and then how they behave. So how do you behave in your role?

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, and when there’s a lack of clarity for you then it creates confusion for those around you. There’s toe stepping. They’re the who’s doing what, who’s leading what, who does have the D? We’ve seen that show up with different layers of leadership inside our organization where if there is not clarity on what your role is, it creates a lack of clarity for a lot of other people.

Daniel Harkavy:

You bet and frustration.

Tricia Sciortino:

Ripple effect. Yeah, a lot of frustration.

Daniel Harkavy:

It creates a lot of frustration. So you’ve got all those six perspectives, all right. You’re not done. And here was the seventh perspective. I was reflecting on my previous two days. This is when there were six perspectives, now going to seven. And I was thinking about my time with the chairman of one organization and the head of people for another organization, both big organizations. And I was thinking these two leaders, they just needed a thinking partner. That’s what I did the last two days. I just thought with them, I challenged, I listened, I asked and I said, “You know what they needed was they needed that perspective of the outsider. They needed to have different conversations than they have with their board or with their team to make sure they were seeing those other six perspectives right.”

Daniel Harkavy:

Were they in that sixth perspective, their role, were they seeing it right? Were they doing the right things, making the right decisions? So they need this perspective of the outsider, especially in today’s times where you live in such volatility and uncertainty and complexity and ambiguity. You need that outsider to help you to think it through. Those are the seven perspectives approach. Each of them with intentional curiosity. Invest your time into each of the six, including that outsider. In your role, you’ll improve. Your effectiveness will improve because you’ll make better decisions and you’ll have more influence. End of the book.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah. I’m so aligned with everything you’re saying personally in that we really believe, especially in that seventh one, is as a CEO of an organization, myself, having somebody to think with, to your point, not ask, to really challenge me and think with me that is not at BELAY is the best gift I get all the time. It gives me a completely different frame of reference because we can get so in our box.

Tricia Sciortino:

Anybody else I’m talking inside the organization, whether they’ve been here for 10 years or 10 days, it’s just not going to be the third party perspective that I need leading an organization at my level. And so I’m an advocate, a proponent, and a fan of leveraging coaching and coaches. I think it makes such a profound difference in anyone’s leadership.

Tricia Sciortino:

I feel like as a leader who’s had the opportunity to work with coaches for many years that I equate it directly to my ability to lead my organization well and to get promoted into new roles and be effective as a leader. So I’m such a fan of you and your work.

Daniel Harkavy:

Thank you.

Tricia Sciortino:

And your book. For anybody listening, what would you say is a good practical next step for them? They’ve heard you talk through these theories, practical, effective theories on influence and decision making and the seven perspectives. And if they’re listening and they’re at the end of this podcast, and they’re saying, “Okay, now what?” What is the best next step maybe somebody could take tomorrow?

Tricia Sciortino:

I mean, mine would be tell them to order your book, but is there anything else you could give to them as a starting point?

Daniel Harkavy:

We created a straightforward assessment, 7perspectives.com, okay. The number 7perspectives.com. There you go. Go there and there’s an assessment you can take. And that assessment is you rating yourself in each of these seven, and it will tell you where you’re at and that will help you. And that doesn’t take long. So I think that’s a good next step. Sure.

Tricia Sciortino:

Yeah, that’s a perfect next step.

Daniel Harkavy:

And it’s free.

Tricia Sciortino:

That’s perfect. Thank you so much, Daniel. Where can our listeners or audience connect with you and your team? Where’s a good place they can find you or connect with you? Website, social?

Daniel Harkavy:

Yeah, buildingchampions.com is the mothership. You can go there and it’s resource-rich. We’re doing some great podcasts. We’ve got a questioning leadership podcast, which is one where I get to interview a lot of these leaders that are in the book.

Tricia Sciortino:

Awesome.

Daniel Harkavy:

So I’ve been enjoying that one. We’ve got a lot of resources and tools for you there. I am on social media, but I’m not as engaged as I used to be. This last year and a half has led me to be more involved life on life with clients and in community. So, I’m a little less active, but I’m still posting stuff. My team’s posting stuff. So I’m on LinkedIn. I’m on Facebook. You can find Daniel Harkavy there and that’s probably the best ways.

Tricia Sciortino:

Awesome. Well, thank you, Daniel. I appreciate your time today. I would actually love it if you would hang around after this episode so I can ask you one more question about helping your leader’s teams make decisions, if you don’t mind. Is that okay with you?

Daniel Harkavy:

I don’t mind.

Tricia Sciortino:

Awesome. So, hey guys, to hear that clip, the bonus question, subscribe to our email list, and we’ll send you a link to the bonus content or visit the onenextsteppodcast.com where you will find the link in our show notes. Thank you, guys. We will see you next week.

Tricia Sciortino:

I don’t know about you guys but that was an excellent podcast. My takeaway is to go get his book. Actually. I think there’s probably a lot of good stories and a lot of good nuggets in there. I actually was feverishly writing a bunch of notes. One of my favorite things he said was as a leader, you need IQ and EQ, and how true. It’s not just intellect. It’s not just emotional intelligence. It’s finding a great combination of both. And it feels like the seamless line between everything if you boiled it all down came to hiring the right people and trusting them to do their jobs. And that’s the leader you want to be. So that was very powerful for me. I hope you guys got something out of it as well. And as always, we have a download for you so you can take your one next step.

Tricia Sciortino:

This week’s download is a free study guide and audio guide to Daniel’s book, The Seven Perspectives of Effective Leadership. And there will be a link and a code BELAY21 to the resource available in the show notes. So to get the show notes, text the phrase One Next Step to 319996 or visit onenextsteppodcast.com and you’ll get access to today’s resource so you can keep moving forward.

Tricia Sciortino:

Thank you for joining us today, guys. Until next time, lead wisely and lead well.

Tricia Sciortino:

Guys, in next week’s episode, our guest is Phil Pallen, the CEO of Phil Pallen Collective and the host of the Brand Therapy podcast. He’ll be talking about how business leaders can use social media as an incredible sales tool by allowing their team members and customers to become ambassadors for their brand. Here’s a sneak peek into our conversation with Phil.

Phil Pallen:

When they decided to launch a new product, it was a candle. They hadn’t done a candle before. Rather than them deciding on the scent, they took it to their audience in a blog post and said, “Here’s what we’re thinking of doing, but we want you to be a part of this decision-making process. What do you think our first candle should be?” Comments on this blog post were over 1,000 comments of people wanting to contribute.

Phil Pallen:

So some of these things we don’t think immediately, “Oh, we can do that,” but actually you can. And when you do something interesting and creative, that’s what people remember. And when people remember that, that’s branding.

Speaker 2:

Thanks for listening to One Next Step. Be sure to subscribe on Apple podcasts or follow us on Spotify. Then, join us next time for more practical business tips and tools to help you get more done, grow your business and lead your team with confidence. For more episodes, show notes and helpful resources, visit onenextsteppodcast.com.

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