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How to Amplify Your Energy to Maximize Your Results

Are you ready to maintain your energy levels and operate at a higher level? Download Mary Brook’s guide “Amplifying Energy.” This guide will teach you how to have more energy so you can not only be your best, but bring your best – at work and home. 

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About This Episode

In this episode, we’re talking about burnout and energy management with Mary Brooks,  the owner of Sustainable Nutrition and the Fuel Better Formula. She has a Master’s Degree in Nutrition and is a certified Integrative Nutrition Coach. She has more than 28 years of experience in health coaching and helps people get to the root cause of low energy, fatigue, and burnout. 

 

This year, especially, has been a challenge for all of us. Learning to work at home, having kids home all day while attempting remote school, feeding them and the family, and not to mention the stress of keeping your family safe during the pandemic — it’s been a lot to juggle emotionally and physically. Mary’s own burnout experience led to health complications which led her to make radical changes in her life. Today, she wants to help you do just that.

1. Body before business.

One of the best things you can do for your body is prioritize your health in the morning. Before you turn on the “work switch,” take some time for yourself – anything from a short meditation to a brisk walk or a full blown workout. The important thing is that you give yourself some time before you enter into the frenzy of the day. This will help you get started with a healthy mindset, which will have a positive, long-term effect on your body. 

2. Be aware of what’s happening around you when you’re experiencing anxiety.

It’s important to stop and focus on your environment and the context of what’s causing you to be anxious. Then, look at the truth of the situation and ask “Am I having a normal reaction to this?” Take a moment, pause, and breathe. By stopping in the moment and understanding what’s going on, you take control of the situation instead of allowing your anxiety to control you.

3. Reducing anxiety starts with taking care of the basics of health.

Drink more water. Get more sunlight. Eat the right things at the right time of day (for example, protein in the morning and carbs in the afternoon). And get more sleep! You’ll be amazed at how much you can reduce anxiety and mental fatigue by simply doing the common sense basics we’ve known most of our lives. 

What is one area in which you could improve your body’s health? Is it more exercise, more sleep, better eating habits, more water? How could some changes in those areas help?
What are some of the key catalysts that cause your anxiety? What steps have you taken or can you take to reduce it?
Think about a time you were experiencing emotional burnout. What caused it and how did you eventually come out of it?
How has the last year and the pandemic affected your emotional health in negative and positive ways?

The brain thinks big, but the body does small. So, start small.

Mary Brooks

Mindfulness means being present to what's happening now.

Mary Brooks

The brain doesn't know the difference between real and imagined. As we feel really overwhelmed, we have to take a moment, pause, breathe and ask, "What is happening?"

Mary Brooks

Body before business.

Mary Brooks

BELAY’s Virtual Bookkeeping Service

Mary Brooks on Instagram and Facebook.

Tricia Sciortino on Instagram and LinkedIn.

Lisa Zeeveld on Instagram and LinkedIn.

(02:46) Mary talks about her recent move to Asheville, NC and a bear sighting. 

(04:12) Mary shares her story of burnout and what led to radical changes in her life. 

(07:05) What are the biggest contributing factors that lead us to mental and emotional fatigue and burnout?

(08:31) The human brain is the only brain that travels forward and backward in time. 

(11:03) How can we spend less time in things that cause stress and be more mindful and healthy?

(14:07) What are the steps someone can take to stop being overwhelmed and anxious?

(15:15) Drink more water!

(15:49) Get sunlight!

(17:51) Make it a playground, not a battleground. We can approach life with more ease. 

(19:36) Avoid context switching and focus on one task at a time. 

(20:58) Before you go on a diet, look at the fundamentals of your health.

(22:15) Body before business. 

(22:57) Mary talks about the importance of good quality sleep. 

(30:05) This week’s one next step: Download Mary Brook’s guide “Amplifying Energy.” This guide will teach you how to have more energy so you can be and bring your best at work and home.

Speaker 1:
… The thing we need to learn to do is just observe our thoughts and have some sort of way of processing them and saying, “Okay, I’m experiencing anxiety.” And a lot of it is just being honest with that and that makes me anxious and then kind of looking at the truth of it and saying, “Okay, am I having a normal reaction to that?”

 

Speaker 2:
Welcome to One Next Step, the most practical business Podcast in the world, helping you get more done, grow your business and lead your team with confidence, with tips and tools you didn’t get in business school. Here are your hosts, Tricia Sciortino and Lisa Zeeveld.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
Welcome to one next step. The practical business podcast that helps you run your business and make it stop running you so you can enjoy your work and your life. I’m Tricia Sciortino, the CEO of Belay.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
And I’m Lisa Zeeveld, the COO of Belay. Together. We are T and LZ. We’ve known each other since 2005 and I’ve had the privilege of working together for a decade. Gosh, whereas time gone T. We have grown a 100% remote business from startup to being recognized on the Inc 5,000 fastest growing list of companies for six years running.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
LZ and I have learned a lot along the way and we have made some great friends. For the one next step, we are inviting them onto the Podcast to bring you episodes filled with excellent content delivered by some talented people. Today, we’re talking about burnout and energy management. This year, especially has been a challenge for all of us learning to work at home, having kids home all day while attempting to remote school, feeding them and the family and not to mention the stress of keeping your family safe during a pandemic. It’s been a lot to juggle emotionally and physically.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
You are definitely not alone. I think people have felt that lately, but everyone is just at capacity and we are all exhausted.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
Today, we are joined by Mary Brooks. She is the owner of Sustainable Nutrition and the Fuel Better formula. She has a master’s degree in nutrition and is a certified integrative nutrition coach. She has over 28 years of experience in health coaching and has helped people get to the root cause of low energy fatigue and burnout.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
Mary’s own burnout experience led to health complications, which led her to make radical changes in her life. As she improved her overall wellbeing, she created the Fuel Better formula. Today, she helps clients not only lose weight, but feel better and gain the energy to get stuff done. Join us as we talk with Mary Brooks.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
Hey Mary, welcome to the Podcast.

 

Mary Brooks:
Thank you so much excited to be here.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
This is going to be such an interesting different topic, but before we get into it, I would love it. If you would share something like fun and interesting about yourself, that maybe our listeners would find intriguing.

 

Mary Brooks:
Fun and interesting. So, I just moved to the Asheville area, just about two months ago and so far we have one bear that has come through our… So, it’s a little bit different than suburban living. But that’s the most exciting thing I think that’s happened to me so far.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
That’s awesome. And Asheville is so beautiful. So, you picked a really good place.

 

Mary Brooks:
I did.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
I know. What’s even more fun about that is that you literally bought your house. You were just like sight on seen. That’s interesting. That’s fun Mary.

 

Mary Brooks:
Yeah, it was sort of the upshot of the whole COVID thing. My husband is an engineer and had wanted to work remote. And then he, obviously got sent home for COVID and then was able to… Because his productivity was up 25% his entire team, they said, “This is going so well, you can permanently be remote.” And so, that gave us the green light to move to the Asheville sort of mountains, if you will.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
I love that. I love that. See, Tricia, everybody is figuring out what we’ve known all along.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
I know. Working remote works.

 

Mary Brooks:
They stole your thunder.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
They did. Well, I am thrilled that you are joining us today because this is such a relevant topic. So, I would love for you to tell us a little bit about your journey, burning out and what led to the radical changes that you had to make in your life.

 

Mary Brooks:
Yeah. So, I think when people think of me… I have a degree in nutrition, but sort of fatigue, low energy burnout is kind of my hotspot, if you will. And of course, most of us have to experience some type of personal crisis for it really to hit home. And for me, there’s a series of events but I did have three children very close in age. I was in a very high-performance job for many years. I was in sales. I was high intensity exerciser. And also, I feel like even though I ate a healthy diet, I ate kind of that low fat diet of the day that we all kind of we’re indoctrinated to. And so, what happened to me, which I hope would not happen to most people is, I ended up with thyroid cancer in my 40s.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
Oh, my gosh.

 

Mary Brooks:
And all I got was sort of the conventional medicine pat on the head, “Oh, you got this, let’s take your thyroid out. Let’s give you radiation. Here’s a prescription. Here you go.” And then, really the burnout happened because I couldn’t get a good night’s sleep. I was chronically exhausted. I had a lot of more… I would say a sort of anxiety. It didn’t have the tremendous weight gain that a lot of people do. But all of that caused me to say like, “What did happen to me? How did this happen?” And so, it caused me to dig my way out of that fatigue on my own, because all I got was medications. So, that’s kind of my sort of pain to purpose story.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
Yeah. Well, I hate that had to happen to you for you to get to where you are today and your real gift to help so many others. So, I just want to pause there and say, I’m happy to hear that you are healthy and that you really have taken advantage of a really horrible situation and brought it around to something great.

 

Mary Brooks:
Yeah. That whole statement sort of like nothing goes to waste really does hit home for me, because as you go through something like that and you grow and my objective as a practitioner is sort of how can I shortcut the path for people? How can I lead people and not have them make some of the mistakes that I made? And then of course, if you do go through something, you start to find your kindred spirits out there. And I think that’s why I see it in the business world so much where, not just women, but women in particular are overwhelmed, burdened, burned out, fatigue, not sleeping, not really taking good care of themselves. It’s a big sort of raveled ball of things that do happen to us.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
Yeah, that’s crazy. I love this conversation already. So, what would you say… I mean, you’ve seen it all and you’ve been through it all are the biggest contributing factors that lead us to these places. That lead us to exhaustion, fatigue, burnout, both mentally, physically and emotionally.

 

Mary Brooks:
Well, I think the biggest one starts in our minds, in our expectations of self and in our current culture. Our culture, has really taught us, look at all the vocabulary, the hustle, the grind, the go getter, the multi-tasker, the over deliverer, the over performer. All of those things, I think have been really infused into our culture. And if you look at us biologically, we weren’t wired for that type of stress. So, I would say that’s number one. We have just piled on expectation, drive and really, the fact that most of us can’t turn it off.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
I would like to associate myself.

 

Mary Brooks:
Where am I people? Right.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
Those of you who cannot see me, I am raising my hand.

 

Mary Brooks:
Right.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
Like where’s the off button? Can I have one, please? I would like one in implanted.

 

Mary Brooks:
Right. So, I think that is the number one factor. We have to learn things like boundaries, what’s enough and also just how to manage our minds. Because a lot of it is what we create. Look, one thing that I think is important for me to say is that, the human brain is the only brain that travels forward in time and backwards in time. Other animals don’t do this. If you take a rat, all a rat does is smell, but the human brain is like looking forward as to like, what’s going to happen next? And it’s looking backwards and it’s like, what did I do wrong? “Oh, I have this mustard stain on my shirt when I was talking to this guy.” So, the key for us, in terms of what you can take away from this, it’s like, we hear this word mindfulness, but mindfulness means being really present to really what’s happening now.

 

Mary Brooks:
And that is something that a lot of us need help doing, because we don’t. Even, probably as you’re talking to me, there’s probably like, “Oh, but the laundry’s in the thing or this person is text messaging me.” There’s all this dopamine hit constantly to our nervous system and our nervous system… Simple way for me to explain it is, if you look at your nervous system, you have two parts. You have the sympathetic with your fight, flight, freeze or fawn, which is people pleasing. Maybe we’ll talk about that. And then, there’s our parasympathetic system which is rest and digest. So, we have that stress system to help us, but we should only be living in it about 20% of the time. And most of us are in that hormonal high cortisol overdrive, 80% of the time. So the reverse.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
Yeah.

 

Speaker 6:
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Speaker 7:
Numbers are totally my thing Tricia and thankfully numbers are Belay Bookkeeper’s thing too. Our sponsor, Belay believes you deserve top notch bookkeepers to produce balance sheets, pay bills, reconcile bank and credit card statements and monthly reports to keep you up to date on the numbers of your organization, whether you’re a church, nonprofit or a business, they have the right people ready to help talk to their team today and never lose sleep over your financials again. Get started by visiting belaysolutions.com/services/bookkeepers today.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
So, if you don’t have an off switch and you can’t really take anything off of your plate right now, but you feel depleted and you feel overwhelmed. And sometimes we have responsibilities that we really can’t take off of our plate. So, what do we do to kind of spend less time in that area and move on to being more mindful and healthy?

 

Mary Brooks:
Right. So, I talk about this all the time. If you really think about the things that stress you out, you don’t want them out of your life. You want those things. You want your job, you want your children. These are things that we don’t want to get rid of. Like, I think just saying managing stress really gives people more stress than it helps. The number, one thing you need to learn to do is, observe how you are reacting to that stress. Because what we do is escalate it. Let’s say you read a text message or you read an email and it’s not particularly positive. And then, it triggers this other thing of like, “Oh, that person is always negative.” And dah, dah, dah. And then. It escalates in your head like, “Okay, that’s going to get worse and that’s going to get worse and that’s going to get worse.” And pretty soon you’re like, you’re off the deep end, right?

 

Mary Brooks:
So, the thing we need to learn to do is just observe our thoughts and have some sort of way of processing them and saying, “Okay, I’m experiencing anxiety.” And a lot of it is just being honest with that and that makes me anxious. And then, kind of looking at the truth of it and saying, “Okay, am I having a normal reaction to that? So, because this is the thing that’s really important is that, the brain doesn’t know the difference between real and imagined. Just like, if you look at an athlete, who’s like before their event, what are they doing? They’re practicing their shot or they’re practicing going down the ski slope. Because they’re training their brain for the result that they want. So, as we feel really overwhelmed, we have to just take a moment, pause, breathe and say like, “What is happening?” That’s a lot of the work that we need to do around that. So, that’s number one.

 

Mary Brooks:
Number two is, and I love the topic of like your outputs impact your… I mean, your inputs impact your output. Then we need to look at what are we putting into our body at the same time that might be exacerbating that. That might be making it worse. Food, for example, toxins, for example. The biggest thing I talk about is our blood sugar. Because if you understand your stress hormone, then you understand that your blood sugar rises because it’s like, “Hey person, we’re in an emergency. Then we just need sugar. We just need sugar to like run the engine because we don’t have time.” But if we’re not fueling our body with the right nutrients, then that can make that worse. And then, we feel like we’re in that constant state of agitation. Makes sense?

 

Tricia Sciortino:
Yeah. So, I feel like that this podcast is just for me. So, what are the answers? What are the fixes? What are the solutions? And what are the steps someone can take? If they’re listening to this Podcast right now, and they’re saying, “Gosh, she’s talking to me. I’m depleted, I’m exhausted. I’m overwhelmed. I’m probably not eating right. And I do have anxiety and stress.” Are there steps or tips that you would recommend to somebody that they could take away and put into practice?

 

Mary Brooks:
Yeah. Absolutely. Because I think it’s super unhelpful to listen to a bunch of podcasts and know that you have a problem and you don’t know a thing to do. And the changes are so overwhelming and you feel like you’re being avalanched. So, I always say that the brain thinks big, but the body does small. So, start small. One thing that you can do is learn to sort of establish the self-trust with yourself. And you’re really developing a relationship with your own mind, which seems weird, but we’re the maker upper of those stories. So, it starts there. And one of the things I would suggest… I’ve got like a whole little checklist. The very first thing you need to do and it’s so simple. If you’ve heard the rule of three, it’s like, air matters, water matters, food matters. But water… if you feel overwhelmed and agitated, make sure you’re not dehydrated.

 

Mary Brooks:
Your brain is mostly water. And 75% of Americans are chronically dehydrated. So, drink water. Because you don’t want to escalate your own feeling of overwhelm. You don’t want to feed the fire. That would be number one. Number two is, get sunlight because we’re all coming off of this year. There isn’t probably a person who doesn’t feel lost. Disappointment, stress, overwhelm, agitation. So, part of what we can do is we can help convince our body, basically the all as well. And you have a natural circadian rhythm that comes when the sun goes up… I mean when the sun comes up and the sun goes down. So, exposing your face and your body to natural light does deep signaling into your brain that helps you. Believe things are not so bad, right? That’s-

 

Tricia Sciortino:
I knew I that I liked the sun for a reason.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
She just gave you permission to be at the beach Tricia.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
I can be at the beach now because there’s way more sunlight there.

 

Mary Brooks:
But remember… You make a good point. A lot of times people wait until they’re exhausted to make a change. That’s not how it works. Little tiny baby steps. And the body needs consistency. So yes, please, go to the beach. But in the meantime, that daily exposure to the sun, first thing in the morning, day after day, after day, after day is going to help. And yes, get yourself a natural light because it’s so much better for your brain. We’ll talk about sleep. But a lot of us are because we’re on our devices and we’re getting this sort of dirty light all the time, then we need to be outdoors and you need to be taking some of that sort of toxicity off of ourselves.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
It’s sort of like, we say in our family that I want to create a life where I don’t have to go on vacation. My life is… Obviously you want to go to fun places, but that you want to create a life that you don’t have to escape. And so, by building in that sunshine and building in that opportunity for fresh air and doing those sorts of things helps create that life that you’re getting that all the time, you’re getting bits and pieces of that all the time.

 

Mary Brooks:
Right. Consistency, consistency, consistency. It doesn’t have to be avalanched. Smaller is really better. The other thing I want to say is that… You guys… okay, you know stress, you know hustle, you know deadlines, but one of the things I love the word ease because we make everything so hard and we try to act like it’s a badge of honor if we’re killing ourselves all the time. Sometimes when I am doing a task that I can hear myself saying, “Oh, I don’t want to do that.” I asked myself, I’m like, “How can you make it ease?” I learned this expression that says, “Make it a playground, not a battleground.” So, let’s say you got a problem. And you’re like, “Oh, I’ve got to work on this for an hour. Like, what can you do to make it pleasurable?”

 

Mary Brooks:
We don’t have to make it all bad and negative all the time. Do you need to play music? Do you need to have some essential oils? Do you need to take a pad of paper and go sit outside? We don’t have to do everything digital. We can do some things analog or maybe you need to just talk it over with a friend. You see what I’m saying? Because that’s why we’re burned out. Because what’s happening is you keep over-performing and then meanwhile, your immune system is suffering. Eventually, it will give you a bill. And it will say, “I tried to get your attention. You weren’t listening. Here’s the bill.” And how does that show up? Like you guys have probably all experienced it, right?

 

Tricia Sciortino:
Oh yeah medical bills. It’s a back surgery for me.

 

Mary Brooks:
Right. So, I think just adopting this attitude that it can have ease. It can have… Yes. You got to pull the… Sometimes dig deep but you’ll also have to look at, “Am I bringing this mindset of agitation to everything I do?” Single tasking. I know you guys probably talk about that already, but what happens when you context switch, is your brain is getting more tired and more tired and more tired. So, you really do need to sort of look at how am I pacing my day. And one thing I’ll tell you is that, cognitive tasks are very tiring. We weren’t really made for the level of cognitive tasks that we’re doing all day long. So, definitely if you look at your day and you say, “Okay, this meeting or this thing…” Then look at, is there something that’s a physical task that I can do? Or can I move around? Can I do that differently? Can I change how I’m holding my body?

 

Mary Brooks:
Because for holding all this tension on our body, it’s again, it’s escalating and we’re… A lot of us are so in our heads that we’re not in our bodies at all. We’re not feeling how we’re feeling. It’s better to say like, “Oh, I do feel kind of headachy.” Or “I do feel like I’ve been working alone and I need to be with a person and put those buffers in so that you’re not headed into burnout.” You have to be proactive. You have to be… I say like, “No one’s really coming to save us.” We have to kind of save ourselves.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
Save ourselves. We are our own heroes when it comes to burnout.

 

Mary Brooks:
Yeah. One thing I will tell you, everyone right now is probably trying to go on a diet. And I will say, before you go on the eat 75 eggs a day diet. Just simply look at the fundamentals. Look at hydration, make sure you have protein and fat at every single meal. One thing in terms of your energy is, your blood sugar spikes more in the morning than any other time of the day. So, we’ve already learned, you don’t want these highs and lows in your blood sugar. By the time you get hangry, right? You can’t get that back. So, having less carbohydrates in the morning and more protein and fat will really serve you throughout the day. And then, I also really find that… I call this Carb o’clock, four o’clock people start to like loose it.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
Carb o’clock. Nice.

 

Mary Brooks:
Carb o’clock, right? When I worked in a physical office it didn’t matter if there was like a four day old doughnut at four o’clock. I would probably eat it just because I’m like, “Ugh.” But our body does need carbohydrates at that time of day. So, I really suggest doing that. Like a little toddler have that afternoon snack. It really will help you. Those are sort of your guard rails of the day. The other thing I suggest… Lots of little phrases. Body before business. We are not just robots, but if we can do something for our body before the day starts, it doesn’t have to be a tough mudder or some big, it could be two minutes of meditation. It can be five minutes of walking. It could be squats and pushups and some other exercise. But getting into your physical body before everything starts, I think is super helpful. And you kind of… in a way it’s saying, “I matter, I’m my client. I have to take care of me.” Right?

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
Right. Well, you kind of tease this out a little bit before. But tell us about sleep. How important is it to get good quality sound?

 

Tricia Sciortino:
How do we get good sleep?

 

Mary Brooks:
Right. Most people coming to me, they’ll probably will say like, “I really would like to lose some weight.” But then they’re like, “But if I had more energy and I could sleep, everything would be so much better.” Right?

 

Tricia Sciortino:
I just said that to you 24 hours ago Mary.

 

Mary Brooks:
Time and time again. That’s what I think, like, “Why am I so tired?” So, this is what’s interesting. The things that we talked about in the beginning, how you start your day, that determines your sleep. Because the body produces melatonin and the cortisol has to come down for you to sleep. Make sense? So, when I was talking about the breakfast and the circadian rhythm and the doing the things for yourself that is actually teeing you up to fall asleep. So, that really, we did cover that. And then, you have to have an attitude that allows you to sleep. So, not consuming sugar at night, obviously. And then, what I really suggest are having a curfew where you say day is done. Like, you’ve got to have a point where you turn off the electronics. That image I like to use is like, if you had little children, if you let that child run around like crazy and they give them a bunch of sugar and then you’re like, “No, go to bed.” It doesn’t work. The body isn’t ready for that.

 

Mary Brooks:
So, you have to tee yourself up for that. I suggest doing a data dump where you just write down all these things that are on your mind. And then, there’s other things that you can do, to like sleep in a dark room. Don’t take your electronics into bed. Don’t snack late at night because all of those things are really sleep killers, but it kind of does begin in your sleep.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
Thank you, Mary. Wow. And T, I saw you writing everything down over there.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
I hope I’m not the only person taking notes right now.

 

Mary Brooks:
I think we learned so much about… Every person out there is probably an expert on a diet because they’ve read about it. But we don’t really learn how to harness our biology. And we are hardwired for things like stress and cortisol and absorption and all those things. And we forget there was really affecting how we’re showing up in the world, how clear our thinking is, how optimistic we can be, how much work we can get done. Like, those things really matter and we don’t really learn them anywhere.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
So true. So true. Well, Mary, thank you so much for joining us today. This has just been such a gift to us and I know it’s been a gift to our listeners, so thank you.

 

Mary Brooks:
Yeah. Happy new year. And I’m hoping everyone sort of has less overwhelm and less burnout this year.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
Yes, you too.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
Amen 2021, less burnouts.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
Man, Mary was awesome today. Tricia, I just saw you writing down like everything.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
I know.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
It was so good.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
So, applicable for where we all are. And it just absolutely resonates with me. I might have said it a couple of times, but I feel like so many people are in that spot and I can relate.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
Yeah. So, I know that you are working with Mary. That you have worked with her in the past. So, this is probably a cheat question, but based on our conversation or perhaps just where she’s helped you before and helped your friends and colleagues, like whats a good takeaway? What’s something you’d like to remind our listeners of?

 

Tricia Sciortino:
Yeah. So, there were a lot of things I took notes on and so much of what she said is so impactful and resonating. But the little phrase that she popped out that really stood out to me was, body before business. And really how taking, even if it’s just five minutes in the morning to focus on your body, whether it’s a very small walk or meditation. Taking those few minutes to take care of your body before you get to businesses is big one. And that is a culprit for me. Personally, is that I’m kind of feet hit the ground out of bed and I’m already running 100 miles an hour. So, it’s a big one for me to kind of stop, take that pause and think about my body before I start the rest of my day. That’s kind of my big mental note, if you will.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
Yeah. Okay. I’m going to keep you accountable.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
I know. But you won’t be able to because if I’m not connected to my phone.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
Well, that’s the point. I can start getting emails from you pretty early. So, I’ll be like, “I’ll respond back to you.”

 

Tricia Sciortino:
Uh-uh (negative). No emailing me at 7:30 AM. You’re supposed to be taking care of your body.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
That’s right.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
Yes. That is not as mine. Yeah. How about you?

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
Yeah. I think this goes really right into that. It just being mindful of your circadian rhythm. How really you think about how you start your morning. Don’t start it very carb heavy, sugar heavy. And then, really just kind of watching your rhythm, watching your body rhythm throughout the day and really getting ready to kind of unwind for the evening. I think that, to her earlier point, we all just want to go, go, go. And we don’t think about there being a process. Now, for those of us who are moms, I don’t know about you Tricia, but I was always very aware of the schedule for my kids. I wasn’t very regimented. I didn’t have to eat at a certain time or any of those things, but I was very mindful on how the day was curated. And I think that as adults, we need to be very mindful about the life that we’re curating and how we put together our day.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
Yeah. I love how you use that word curating. It’s so very true. Like all the parts and pieces you’re assembling for yourself throughout the day. And probably the ones that we’re doing are not creating the best overall package for us. Because, I am a carb o’clock. That’s another one. I really love how she talks about it. four o’clock is carb o’clock. For me it’s like three o’clock. But there is kind of that time where you do feel depleted. And there’s something kind of nice about her saying you should have carbs. I don’t have to be carb free. It’s actually not healthy for you to not eat carbs. And so, I love that there’s almost kind of this, We’re being empowered and enabled to take care of our bodies in new ways and not starve them. And one of the things that Mary says is, we’re not toddlers. We are suppose to have a certain amount of calories in a day and a certain amount of meals. And dieting and starving ourselves is not how our state of being.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
No.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
Anyway, all goodness. So much goodness.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
All goodness. All goodness. Well, now it is time for the one next step. As the most practical business Podcasts we want to make sure taking action is easy. So, with each episode, we’re going to offer you one next step to propel you forward. And today’s next step is to download Mary Brook’s guide, Amplifying Energy. This guide will teach you how to have more energy so you can be and bring your best at work and home. Be sure to download the guide so you can maintain your energy levels and operate at a high level.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
I know. I’m downloading the guide. So, for you guys to download it now, text the phrase “one next step” to 31996 or visit onenextsteppodcast.com. You’ll also receive a summary of today’s episode, which includes key quotes, takeaways and links to resources.

Lisa Zeeveld:
Thank you so much for listening to this episode of One Next Step. We hope you enjoyed what you’re hearing from us and now, well, we want to hear from you. So head on over to Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you listen and leave us a review. We created this Podcast to help you lead your team and grow your business. So, we read every one of them.

 

Tricia Sciortino:
Until next time, own your journey. It’s your life and your business. It’s up to you to create the life and organization you want. Join us next week for more practical tips and actionable tools to advance your business, one step at a time.

 

Lisa Zeeveld:
So, start by making today count.

 

Speaker 2:
Thanks for listening to One Next Step. Be sure to subscribe on Apple podcasts or follow us on Spotify, then join us next time for more practical business tips and tools to help you get more done, grow your business and lead your team with confidence. For more episodes, show notes and helpful resources. Visit onenextsteppodcast.com.

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